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Michael L. Tiefenbacher RSS Feed (Menomonie, WI USA)
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The Lone Ranger: Collector's Edition
The Lone Ranger: Collector's Edition
9 used & new from $249.98

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Edited versions, July 30, 2013
There seems to be much discussion here about the absence of several minutes of each of the episodes as presented here and on all previous Classic Media releases. Comments from serious collectors make it clear: the unedited versions are available, intact, in the hands of perhaps thousands of people who had the presence of mind and wherewithal to collect them from local airings or even original prints. Just because Classic Media (and now Dreamworks) seem to feel that it's not worth the effort and financial commitment to seek out and restore the original versions doesn't mean that it can't be done. Case in point: the versions of episodes of THE LIFE AND LEGEND OF WYATT EARP currently showing on the Western Channel show clear evidence of patchwork re-editing to a lot of the episodes in which two or more versions of episodes edited in different ways have been assembled in more or less complete versions. (So far, I've observed none which had the kind of continuity jumps seen in LONE RANGER episodes I watched on the Western Channel.) Opening credits utilizing the standard syndication-print Tombstone sign affixed to episodes in which Wyatt is marshal of Wichita and Dodge City in seasons one through four (which could have been easily replaced by the correct openings, since they are there on other episodes) are the only indications on most of them that these are not the original prints, other than the infrequent episodes where new closing credits had to be constructed. What it shows is that the copyright holders--or the Western Channel--clearly cared about the quality of their series. Classic Media doesn't seem to have that dedication, since I'd bet that a call for complete episodes to Lone Ranger fandom at large would probably easily provide the raw material necessary to compile a truly complete set of the original series. Until that happens, if the editing doesn't bother you I'd say save your money at least till the price is far lower than it currently stands.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 9, 2013 10:13 AM PDT


Best of Warner Bros. 25 Cartoon Collection: Hanna-Barbera
Best of Warner Bros. 25 Cartoon Collection: Hanna-Barbera
DVD ~ Various
Price: $22.38
46 used & new from $13.89

6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A review of the concept, April 13, 2013
I believe that the intent of this collection was to present a chronological history of Hanna-Barbera's TV-output from 1957 through around 1966, when it kind of goes off the rails. True, Hokey Wolf actually should be down with the YOGI BEAR SHOW segments since it took the place of the YOGI cartoons on HUCKLEBERRY HOUND in 1961, but apart from that everything is representative of the order of release of the H-B series (and the one theatrical cartoon series, LOOPY DE LOOP) through the 1966 shows. Skipped for 1966 are the second season of SINBAD JR. (following Trans-Artists' first season) and the LAUREL & HARDY cartoons (neither owned by Warner), sad omissions because Sinbad was voiced by Tim Matheson (of JONNY QUEST) and his parrot Salty was played by Mel Blanc, while Laurel and Hardy bore more than a little resemblence to the ABBOTT AND COSTELLO cartoons from the next year. Then in 1967, missing are the YOUNG SAMSON & GOLIATH episodes paired in syndication with SPACE KIDETTES, both segments from MOBY DICK and THE MIGHTY MIGHTOR, FANATSTIC FOUR (Marvel, now owned by Disney), and SHAZZAN. 1968 series that were skipped were the animated segments from BANANA SPLITS ADVENTURE HOUR (as the backlash against super-heroes caused most new H-B series to be derived from literary classics): ARABIAN KNIGHTS, THREE MUSKETEERS and MICRO-VENTURE), THE ADVENTURES OF GULLIVER, WACKY RACES, and the semi-animated NEW ADVENTURES OF HUCK FINN. Other than CATTANOOGA CATS (which is only partially represented in the set, missing the AROUND THE WORLD IN 79 DAYS cartoon), 1969's other missing series are PERILS OF PENELOPE PITSTOP, DASTARDLY AND MUTTLEY IN THEIR FLYING MACHINES, and that little-known series, SCOOBY-DOO, WHERE ARE YOU? Three 1970 series are skipped to take in FUNKY PHANTOM here, and then another 27 to include 1976's JABBERJAW, neither of which seem terribly pertinent to this collection.

That said, this compilation does include plenty of segments new to DVD (since the season sets for them have yet to appear), including RUFF & REDDY, QUICK DRAW McGRAW, SUPER SNOOPER & BLABBER MOUSE, AUGIE DOGGIE & DOGGIE DADDY, LOOPY DE LOOP, WALLY GATOR, TOUCHE TURTLE & DUM-DUM, LIPPY THE LION & HARDY HAR-HAR, PETER POTAMUS & SO-SO, BREEZLY BRUIN & SNEEZLY SEAL, YIPPEE, YAPPEE & YAHOOEY, ATOM ANT, SQUIDDLY DIDDLEY, PRECIOUS PUPP, SECRET SQUIRREL, HILLBILLY BEARS, WINSOME WITCH, ABBOTT & COSTELLO, CATTANOOGA CATS, IT'S THE WOLF, MOTORMOUSE & AUTOCAT, FUNKY PHANTOM and JABBERJAW. (Without looking, I'm not sure if any of the HUCKLEBERRY HOUND segments are from the unreleased second season or not.)

Arguably, the CATTANOOGA CATS segments that were included have more in common with the earlier H-B style than anything from the '70s (funny animals in 5 to 7-minute segments) but apart from the series Warner Bros. doesn't own, SAMSON & GOLIATH, MOBY DICK, MIGHTY MIGHTOR and SHAZZAN (plus, perhaps, MICRO-VENTURE) would have made a more representative progression of the studio's output. Had I been in charge, I'd have included the first four of the aforementioned "super-hero"-type segments here plus the rarely seen hour special, ALICE IN WONDERLAND (OR, WHAT'S A NICE GIRL LIKE YOU DOING IN A PLACE LIKE THIS?) from 1966, which would make this a must-buy instead of just something nice to have. Another possibility would have been the H-B version of Mexico's CANTINFLAS series (circa '65-'67, or later; experts differ) which aired in English as AMIGO & FRIENDS with narration from John Stephenson, but the segments I've seen look a bit more recent (circa '72) so I'm not certain that they fit the era.

My assumption is that this will be quickly followed by another 25-cartoon sampler covering the late '60s and early '70s (obviously built around SCOOBY-DOO). I suppose they might go back to include the missing four cartoons from '67, but most of the 1968-forward series share character design by Iwao Takamoto, and thus look a lot different from the earlier Ed Benedict/Jerry Eisenberg/Doug Wildey/Alex Toth-designed first decade, so it's a shame they made the content-decisions they made. And of course, with most later cartoons lasting a full half-hour each, it could be difficult to wedge 25 of them onto the same number of discs. Since the series which would appear on that one don't interest me terribly much, that's someone else's problem.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 9, 2013 7:45 PM PDT


The Donna Reed Show: Season 4 - The Lost Episodes
The Donna Reed Show: Season 4 - The Lost Episodes
DVD ~ Donna Reed
Price: $22.49
34 used & new from $14.95

53 of 57 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Lost Episodes"?, September 29, 2011
What the sub-title "The Lost Episodes" is probably referring to is that nearly this entire season was skipped by Nick at Nite through every run of the series in the '80s and early '90s. Time after time, they skipped from season 4's episode #2 ("A Rose is a Rose") to episode #2 of season 5, ("Mrs. Stone and Dr. Hyde"), thus skipping Mary's debuting "Johnny Angel" on the February 1, 1962 episode (about a week after it debuted on Billboard's Hot 100). After that, Nick skipped all of Season 6 and 7 (with the odd exception of "What Are Friends For?" which aired November 28, 1963, episode 6.11), skipping the half-dozen scattered episodes Shelley Fabares did after leaving the regular cast (a la Don Knotts on ANDY GRIFFITH SHOW) as well as most of Bob Crane's run as Dr. Dave Kelsey prior to HOGAN'S HEROES--jarringly resuming two years later with the first episode of Season 8, "Pop Goes Theresa" (9/16/65). So, should someone get the rights to issue seasons 6 and 7, they too could legitimately be billed as "Lost Episodes."
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 7, 2012 5:43 AM PDT


Flipper The New Adventures- Season 1
Flipper The New Adventures- Season 1
DVD ~ Brian Wimmer
Price: $59.98
27 used & new from $49.98

10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Oh, come on now!, October 7, 2010
It's bad enough that these are only being manufactured on demand, but geez--it would be nice if MGM's current employees could have watched an episode and realized that the cast picture on the minimally illustrated cover was from the second season! Neither Brian Wimmer or Colleen Flynn are pictured--the photo they used is of second-season stars Elizabeth Morehead, Whip Hubley, and Jessica Alba--who seems to be the only person they were focused on when they were flipping through studio press kits for the series. (Since Hubley is the only one of the five who stuck around for the third and fourth seasons, I guess those were easy to eliminate from contention.)
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 26, 2011 1:23 AM PDT


A World Without Love/I Don't Want To See You Again
A World Without Love/I Don't Want To See You Again
25 used & new from $22.21

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The music is great, the total package, not so much, September 23, 2006
Peter and Gordon have been unjustly ignored in the annals of rock history in general and in the assessment of the British invasion in particular. This could be attributable to the sorry state of their recorded canon on CD, which up until the three Collectable twofer collections, comprised a long series of very nice but generally redundant greatest-hits CDs. Unfortunately, Collectables barely exceeded the minimum amount of effort in creating their reissues, for whatever reason.

As is obvious from most of their product, Collectables doesn't have a lot of money for graphics or design. Their approach on licensed product from major labels indicates they also try to save on the total number of tracks, rarely exceeding 24. (Sadly, Capitol never did a P&G "Definitive Collection" like they did with their other British invasion acts, which took full advantage of the CD capacity, often with 30 or 31 songs.) Each of the three discs in their Peter & Gordon reissues adheres to this rule of thumb, as if this will somehow fulfill any possible collectors' needs. Collectables obviously chose to only consider reissuing the six Capitol LPs that charted on Billboard's Top 200. Their other four Capitol albums were skipped: their fifth, 1966's "Peter and Gordon Sing The Hits of Nashville, Tennessee" (which preceded "Lady Godiva" by about a month) and their final three, 1967's "Knight In Rusty Armor" (featuring two of the "bonus" tracks from these three CDs, "Knight in Rusty Armor" and "To Show I Love You") and "In London For Tea" (featuring the other two "bonus" tracks, "Sunday For Tea" and "The Jokers"), and 1968's "Hot, Cold and Custard," (their final hurrah, an adventurous LP which was critically acclaimed and incredibly hard to find). That the bonus tracks are all we will be getting from these four albums is hardly indicative of either their quality, or any dearth of rare tracks they could easily have added to those first three CDs in their stead.

Although more popular in the U.S. than in their native England, the first two Peter & Gordon albums appeared there first, and when Capitol imported them for release, they were no kinder to their running order than they were to the Beatles. In particular, their second LP "In Touch With," featured three songs never released in America: "Barbara Allen," "Ain't That Lovin' You Baby," and "Leave Me In The Rain." Additionally, the '64 UK EP "Just For You" featured "Roving Rambler," while the '64 French EP, "Nobody I Know," contained "Leave My Woman Alone." A 1966 45 appeared only in Germany: "Wunder" b/w "Liebe, Gluck und Treue," while a four-song French-language EP also appeared in France that year, "Chantent En Francais." Two B-sides fell through the cracks: 1966's "Start Trying Someone Else" (B-side of "To Show I Love You," later used in the UK as the B-side of "Sunday For Tea"), and 1967's "The Town I Live In" (the quickly withdrawn original B-side of "Lady Godiva"). The final single tracks that never appeared on LP or CD were also their final record as a duo: "I Can Remember (Days Gone By)" b/w "Hard Time, Rainy Day." The first Gordon Waller solo single "Speak To Me" b/w "Little Nonie" appeared only in the U.S. while the pair were still together in 1967; four more 45s by Gordon alone appeared on EMI labels (two in England only, one in Europe only, and one, the Buddy Holly song "Everday" b/w "Because of a Woman," came out in America, England, and presumably the rest of the world--all in 1968. (Two more Waller singles appeared on Bell in '69 and '70, but that would require two separate licenses.) Live versions of their early hits appeared on both 1964's "Tribute to Michael Holliday" ("A World Without Love") and 1990's "The Sullivan Years: The British Invasion" ("I Don't Want To See You Again.") So there are fifteen released studio tracks, ten solo Gordon Waller EMI songs, and a couple of live tracks, sufficiently spread out over the years to provide quite appropriate bonus tracks which wouldn't have stood out production-wise for the proposed five CDs which would have contained the original ten LPs. And except for that final single and the solo Gordon songs, all of them appear on British or Japanese CDs which are still in print!

Instead, we got the still-quite-enjoyable three discs featuring only a portion of the team's output, restricted (except for those "bonus" tracks) to their first two years' work, and rendered non-essential to anyone who has the original LPs. Because of the way Capitol spread out the recordings, many of the tracks left off the final two British albums "'66" and "Somewhere..." appear on the 1967 albums Collectables chose not to reissue. And we're all deprived of the experience of hearing "Hot, Cold and Custard," which those of us who couldn't find the money to buy it at list price on LP in 1968, really can't afford it now when it generally goes for in excess of $50 at a minimum.

Oh, what should have been. I still believe that both Peter & Gordon and their fans deserve far better.
Comment Comments (7) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 10, 2013 9:14 PM PST


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