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K. Harris "Film aficionado" RSS Feed (StudioCityGuy33 at Yahoo dot com)
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Cool Gel N Cap - Kids Ice Packs & Heat Packs With Children's First Aid Cap - Toby The Puppy - Cold Therapy and Warm Therapy For Kids
Cool Gel N Cap - Kids Ice Packs & Heat Packs With Children's First Aid Cap - Toby The Puppy - Cold Therapy and Warm Therapy For Kids
Price: $12.99
2 used & new from $12.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Cute As All-Get-Out, But Hardly Essential And a Bit Awkward In Design, February 6, 2015
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
First, let's just get the obvious out of the way. This Cool Gel N Cap is just about the most adorable thing I've ever seen. It's a thin little hat with a Velcro strap that looks like a cute little puppy on your child's head. Any kid would love this hat, even without it having a practical use!

However, it is the practical use that I must comment on. The hat comes with two non-toxic gel packs. If you want cold treatment, the packs can be stored in the freezer. If you want to apply heat, they can be microwaved for 10 seconds. The interior of the hat is double lined so that you may place these two packs almost anywhere you want to: over the ears, on the forehead, along the back of the head. For myself, I often use both heat and cold therapy for migraines and intense sinus pressure, so we have adult applications all around. I thought this would be a fun way for the little ones to use the same kind of treatment (and I do like it for ear aches). But aside from the two obvious ear flaps, it is hard to maintain the gel pack exactly where you might want it. I put them in the hat, try to hold them in place, get the hat onto the head and I'm still trying to reach into it (while it's on the toddler's noggin) to get them into the right spot. The design is almost too free form.

Overall, though, this is cute and nice to have around. I don't know that I'd recommend for all my friends to rush out and buy one, but it might make a nice little gift for someone who has everything. KGHarris, 2/15.


Barilla White Fiber Rotini Pasta, 12 Ounce (Pack of 8)
Barilla White Fiber Rotini Pasta, 12 Ounce (Pack of 8)
Price: $24.83

4.0 out of 5 stars Slightly More Dietary Fiber Than Whole Wheat, White Fiber Pasta Is A Good Substitute For A Traditional Choice, February 6, 2015
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Barilla is the brand of pasta that I most often buy. Although I can't honestly say that I find a huge difference between boxed dry pasta brands, I do think that Barilla is reliable and usually well priced. A couple of years ago, however, we switched almost entirely to either Whole Wheat or Veggie pasta for the extra nutritional value be it in fiber and whole grain (whole wheat) or the extra punch from the vegetable puree. Truthfully, I had never even heard of White Fiber pasta until I had the chance to sample Barilla White Fiber Rotini as well as Barilla White Fiber Mini Shells. As fiber is something we've consciously added to our diet as we approach middle age, I thought this would be a great way to add additional fiber to our daily regimen.

First, I'll say that the cook time, consistency and taste of White Fiber pasta is exactly what one might expect from traditional pasta. It tastes very similar to the regular choice. It isn't substantially higher in fiber, however, than the already available Whole Wheat. White Fiber has about 24% of you daily allowance (6 grams dietary fiber per serving), it is only slightly more than the 20% (or 5 grams) offered by Whole Wheat. In many ways, it simply comes down to preference. We simply enjoy the difference of Whole Wheat and prefer to remain with that. But if you don't care for Whole Wheat, this is a great alternative to try out. KGHarris, 2/15.


Unbecoming: A Novel
Unbecoming: A Novel
by Rebecca Scherm
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $20.93
87 used & new from $12.82

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An Intriguing Character Piece About How We Construct Identity, Not The Thriller The Marketing Seems To Promise, February 5, 2015
This review is from: Unbecoming: A Novel (Hardcover)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Rebecca Scherm's debut novel "Unbecoming" is certainly an intriguing character study and an experience that is easy to recommend. However, as is often the case, the marketing team responsible for word on the story has oversold the tale as one of suspense. With allusions to Patrica Highsmith and Alfred Hitchcock in the description, the novel's jacket even begs comparison to current literary heavyweight Gillian Flynn. I don't get it. While the need to sell books is certainly the goal of any publishing house, setting up false expectations can oftentimes backfire when readers of a certain genre are tricked (essentially) into picking up something they might not ordinarily have chosen to read. So to set the record straight, "Unbecoming" would fall squarely into the category of literary fiction. I don't see this as a negative, the book works well in its own right as both a drama and a fascinating dissection of identity.

The story in "Unbecoming" is told from the vantage point of a young woman named Grace. As the story opens, Grace has established residence in Paris as an art restorer under an assumed identity. What caused this to happen? How did a girl from small town Tennessee turn into this mysterious protagonist? That is the heart of "Unbecoming" as Grace relates more and more of her story through chapters that alternate between past and present. She must come to terms with a troubling past while trying to make sense of a future in which she seems to lack a certain freedom. It doesn't help matters that Grace's current occupation does not seem completely above board, but this willingness to bend propriety appears to stem from decisions made long ago. I won't reveal much more of the plot. Let's just say that Grace is running from past indiscretions, but maybe they have to catch up with her to finally allow her to be a version of her real self.

For the most part, I found "Unbecoming" a really interesting read. As we all build certain public personas of how we want to be perceived, Grace is the poster child for trying to fit in. The Grace of Tennessee builds a carefully constructed idea of who she should be. Truthfully, though, it isn't ever really her. As we learn, she will never be the perfect daughter or girlfriend, there is something inherently darker inside. And even though the Grace of Paris has built an edifice of lies and misdirection, it seems closer to the true embodiment of her character. As the two worlds collide, Grace finally starts to take full responsibility for some of her choices. And while there is an element of crime in "Unbecoming," this should never be considered a thriller. If you are waiting for a big climax or major action, that is never Scherm's intent. Instead, "Unbecoming" builds quietly and even surprises with a surprising element of understanding and even acceptance. KGHarris, 2/15.


Barilla Veggie Pasta, Rotini, 12 Ounce (Pack of 8)
Barilla Veggie Pasta, Rotini, 12 Ounce (Pack of 8)
Price: $17.66

5.0 out of 5 stars A Bounty Of Barilla: Testing A Variety Of Pasta Choices From This Reliable Brand, January 29, 2015
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I'm not the kind of person who can rave about packaged pasta. it just isn't in me. To my mind, the pasta is usually just a vehicle for whatever topping we're going to put on it! That said, however, Barilla has become our most common choice over the last few years. Why? A couple of reasons, really. Price-wise, this is usually one of the more economical choices. The pasta is reliable and tasty, the variety is impressive, there is a whole grain option, and there is even a new PLUS line for those looking to increase their protein intake.

Recently, I received a whole slew of Barilla to try out. Some of these are regulars on my table (like the Whole Grain) and some were first time uses. Again, though, Barilla is a brand I swear by and use almost every week. I just find it hard to gush about food products.

Veggie Pasta Rotini (5 Stars): When I don't get whole grain, I tend to opt for the veggie varieties. The addition of zucchini and spinach adds additional vitamins from vegetables without compromising the integrity of the pasta. Personally, I fend that this cooks and eats like traditional pasta (an easy substitution for your kids).

Whole Grain Spaghetti (4 1/2 stars): We frequently opt for the whole grain option, I suppose it seems like the healthier alternative. As we've gotten older, we've consciously tried to up our fiber intake and this does so in a pleasant way. Made with 51% whole wheat, we also think these are tastier than traditional pasta. Typical spaghetti preparation.

Whole Grain Thin Spaghetti (5 stars): A thinner choice, this gives you the benefits of the whole grains and fiber but mixes better with sauces.

Mezze Penne (4 stars): We eat a surprising amount of Penne and this Mezze is slightly thinner in cylindrical format. Cooks up and maintains its shape well. We often do baked dishes where we cook the pasta first, then bake it. Even double prepared, they hold their shape well and taste good. Better integrity under these circumstances than the wider penne.

Linguine Fini (4 1/2 stars): These delineations amuse me. It had never occurred to me that I needed an even thinner Linguine, so (of all of these choices) this was probably the one I wouldn't have tried on my own. But we tend to like this (angel hair is one of our top choices), so this was tasty enough.

Oven Ready Lasagna (4 stars): I don't do lasagna very often and never from scratch! If you are a short-cut cook like me, you want things to make your life easier. These noodles don't require any pre-boiling and cook while the dish is baking. It's a brilliant idea that works well for the most part. Due to inconsistencies in layering, you might have sections that crisp up more than others. But a little unevenness is a willing trade for the pain of making traditional lasagna.

Ditalini Soup Cuts (4 stars): This is one of the products that I probably wouldn't have picked up of my own accord. I'm simply not a soup maker. But these little pasta cylinders were actually very nice, and super easy to use. We added them to a crock pot preparation. I was afraid they might dissolve completely, but they held up well and added a nice dimesion.

Penne Plus (4 stars): This is like the premium choice in Barilla, and so it is more expensive. It's not my first choice. But it would appeal to those that are looking to add protein to their diet, like vegetarians. It has protein and Omega 3's, and is made with healthy ingredients like flax seed and legumes. It takes a little longer to cook, but still tastes fine. KGHarris, 3/12.


Brother Printer PTD600 PC Connectible Label Maker with Color Display
Brother Printer PTD600 PC Connectible Label Maker with Color Display
Price: $66.58
63 used & new from $55.93

4.0 out of 5 stars An Intuitive Label Maker That Requires Additional Purchases To Really Appreciate Its Versatility, January 28, 2015
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I'm a fan of the Brother P-Touch system and have had one variation of this label maker at every place I've ever worked. That said, I have seen the machines become more versatile and more sophisticated as the years have progressed. The PT-D600 is easily the most advanced P-touch unit that I have ever owned. And if you're looking for a rudimentary (meaning old fashioned) machine that cranks out basic labels, this might be more than you need. If, on the other hand, you are looking to step things up by being able to access or create different designs, templates, and/or types of labels, I think this might surprise you with what it offers.

The unit, itself, has a larger footprint than older devices but that's to be expected.

It comes with:
Label Maker
Standard Black on White Laminating Tape
Power Adapter
USB Cable

You can use the P-Touch keyboard to devise and print labels, of course, but for maximum utility--the unit can be hooked up to your computer where you have a rather impressive amount of content. Seriously, I didn't know I needed to make all of the labels I did until I started browsing the online options. Then I went a little bit crazy. You can make six different label widths and there are also a number a different colors and styles of tape (but importantly, these are all purchased individually at an additional cost). But even buying a few (and I did), it's still worth it to design really professional labels. These printed very crisply.

I don't have a lot of bother for instruction manuals, I like items that have an intuitive feel. I felt like I could utilize the PT-D600 right out of the box. But I did find myself exploring more and more options, though, as I started to see the various uses. I don't know that I'd call this product necessary for every household and/or office, but it offers great versatility. I've used it well beyond what I would use a standard label maker for. I, literally, have sat with this thing hooked up to the computer looking for applications at work. I don't really get excited about office products, but I liked this one. But just a warning: The TZE tape is readily available for purchase in different styles, but it's not always cheap. KGHarris, 1/15.


La ciénaga
La ciénaga
DVD ~ Mercedes Morán
Offered by newbury_comics
Price: $20.99
13 used & new from $20.79

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars From 2001, This Argentinean Feature Depicts The Unrelenting Decay Of A Bourgeois Family, January 23, 2015
This review is from: La ciénaga (DVD)
Short Take: This is NOT a film for casual viewers.

Recent Criterion releases have boasted a lot of big titles (Tootsie, The Big Chill, It Happened One Night) and a lot of big name directors (Sturges, Fassbinder, Cassavetes). I sometimes prefer, however, when they champion smaller films that deserve a wider audience. I think it's fair to say that the 2001 Argentinean drama "La ciénaga" is one of their most intimate releases in recent months, but it may also be one of their more challenging endeavors. Lucrecia Martel's chaotic saga boasts minimal plot, multiple characters that take a while to distinguish, an almost malevolent environment, and an air of utter despair and despondency. Almost everyone in the film suffers from complete boredom or abject apathy about the world around them. In brief, this is not a film for the casual viewer looking for lighthearted entertainment. In scenes that alternate between tragic and darkly humorous, "La ciénaga" tracks several branches of a modern Argentinean family. Much of the action takes place on the crumbling estate that represents a class system being left behind. The palpable rot is evident in every scene and this may well be a definitive portrait of bourgeois decline.

I was absolutely captivated by the opening sequence of "La ciénaga." The aftermath of a night (or day) of debauchery is shot in an exquisitely close and dizzying fashion that reminded me of a horror film. The literal translation of "La ciénaga" is "The Swamp" and that perfectly encapsulates the fetid environment of the estate as well as the moral morass of the principle characters. As I mentioned, there isn't a substantial plot to follow, nor is there specific character development. The movie ends much as it begins with a rather unpleasant occurrence. If this sounds terrible to you, you might well loathe this exhausting experience. Where the film does succeed, however, is in its utterly naturalistic approach. You might swear you're watching a documentary of real people at times as opposed to seeing actors. And the film is shot in a way that makes it seem as if you're a fly on the wall. With actors coming into and out of the frame, seemingly at random, the experience can seem like footage from a rather disappointing family reunion shot by a drunken reveler.

While I know this description seems unflattering, it is also the director's intent. To capture the mundane and to evoke the general feeling of malaise experienced by the characters is part of the movie's mood. This is very much a film reliant on atmosphere. And while nowhere in "La ciénaga" is there an overt political message, you can feel the social critique and class warfare commentary even as it's left unsaid. Like the sticky summer nights depicted by the swamp, the movie's ambiance almost traps the viewer. I know that many viewers will hate "La ciénaga" while other may champion it as a mini-masterpiece of naturalism. I, ultimately, fall somewhere in the middle ground. I didn't necessarily like the characters, but I feel as if this was a movie I would remember. And that's something in this era of carbon copy sequels and remakes. Truly, the opening pool scene is probably one image I will never forget and several other moments of macabre humor linger. Not always pleasant, at least "La ciénaga" is distinctive and speaks to a very specific time and place. More for the arthouse crowd, I'd take a chance on this one only if nothing I've said so far has scared you away. KGHarris, 1/15.


La ciénaga [Blu-ray]
La ciénaga [Blu-ray]
DVD ~ Mercedes Morán
Offered by MightySilver
Price: $22.51
24 used & new from $19.09

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars From 2001, This Argentinean Feature Depicts The Unrelenting Decay Of A Bourgeois Family, January 23, 2015
This review is from: La ciénaga [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
Short Take: This is NOT a film for casual viewers.

Recent Criterion releases have boasted a lot of big titles (Tootsie, The Big Chill, It Happened One Night) and a lot of big name directors (Sturges, Fassbinder, Cassavetes). I sometimes prefer, however, when they champion smaller films that deserve a wider audience. I think it's fair to say that the 2001 Argentinean drama "La ciénaga" is one of their most intimate releases in recent months, but it may also be one of their more challenging endeavors. Lucrecia Martel's chaotic saga boasts minimal plot, multiple characters that take a while to distinguish, an almost malevolent environment, and an air of utter despair and despondency. Almost everyone in the film suffers from complete boredom or abject apathy about the world around them. In brief, this is not a film for the casual viewer looking for lighthearted entertainment. In scenes that alternate between tragic and darkly humorous, "La ciénaga" tracks several branches of a modern Argentinean family. Much of the action takes place on the crumbling estate that represents a class system being left behind. The palpable rot is evident in every scene and this may well be a definitive portrait of bourgeois decline.

I was absolutely captivated by the opening sequence of "La ciénaga." The aftermath of a night (or day) of debauchery is shot in an exquisitely close and dizzying fashion that reminded me of a horror film. The literal translation of "La ciénaga" is "The Swamp" and that perfectly encapsulates the fetid environment of the estate as well as the moral morass of the principle characters. As I mentioned, there isn't a substantial plot to follow, nor is there specific character development. The movie ends much as it begins with a rather unpleasant occurrence. If this sounds terrible to you, you might well loathe this exhausting experience. Where the film does succeed, however, is in its utterly naturalistic approach. You might swear you're watching a documentary of real people at times as opposed to seeing actors. And the film is shot in a way that makes it seem as if you're a fly on the wall. With actors coming into and out of the frame, seemingly at random, the experience can seem like footage from a rather disappointing family reunion shot by a drunken reveler.

While I know this description seems unflattering, it is also the director's intent. To capture the mundane and to evoke the general feeling of malaise experienced by the characters is part of the movie's mood. This is very much a film reliant on atmosphere. And while nowhere in "La ciénaga" is there an overt political message, you can feel the social critique and class warfare commentary even as it's left unsaid. Like the sticky summer nights depicted by the swamp, the movie's ambiance almost traps the viewer. I know that many viewers will hate "La ciénaga" while other may champion it as a mini-masterpiece of naturalism. I, ultimately, fall somewhere in the middle ground. I didn't necessarily like the characters, but I feel as if this was a movie I would remember. And that's something in this era of carbon copy sequels and remakes. Truly, the opening pool scene is probably one image I will never forget and several other moments of macabre humor linger. Not always pleasant, at least "La ciénaga" is distinctive and speaks to a very specific time and place. More for the arthouse crowd, I'd take a chance on this one only if nothing I've said so far has scared you away. KGHarris, 1/15.


The Frozen Dead by Minier, Bernard (2014) Hardcover
The Frozen Dead by Minier, Bernard (2014) Hardcover
by Bernard Minier
Edition: Hardcover
3 used & new from $19.89

3.0 out of 5 stars An Intriguing Import That Starts With Promise But Grows Progressively More Outlandish, January 21, 2015
Bernard Minier's "The Frozen Dead," for me, was the quintessential summer beach read. While some found the pace too slow, I found this an engaging enough read that moved along nicely enough. My reservations about the book are a bit more complex. While the novel boasts a spectacularly interesting locale and a bizarre and macabre murder tableau to open the story, it quickly degenerates into a rather expected formula. The potential to be great was inherent in the tale, but the cardinal sins of the book were two-fold. One, the story moved further and further away from believability as it progressed. Instead of the gritty noir of some of the recent Scandinavian imports, this French translation favored outlandishness over reality. Two, while the multi-layered mystery was intriguing, the resolutions and culprits were all too apparent or obvious. I called many of the book's big plot twists long before they occurred on the page.

"The Frozen Dead" takes place in the wintry environs of the French Pyrenees. Minier does a great job incorporating this landscape into his convoluted tale and I thought that this locale was essential to the success of the overall novel. At first, it seems like a lot of disparate elements are thrown together. Within the first chapters, a new doctor takes a position at an asylum for the criminally insane and a grisly discovery is found at a local power plant. Are they related? Only time will tell. A local cop named Servaz is pressured to investigate the discovery as it involves a very prominent and influential citizen. In his pursuit of the truth, he is partnered with Officer Irene Ziegler who has long-standing ties to the community. When a body is found, they are left to wonder whether or not this is related to the initial crime.

As the strange occurrences start to mount up, the recent spate of violence can't be coincidental! Minier introduces a large cast, maybe too large as peripheral characters don't get too much in the way of development. Everything starts to be tied together with a connection to mysterious suicides from many years ago. As I said, the plot grows increasingly preposterous as more and more is explained. Soon all of the different parts become intertwined, if not always in a very believable way. Still, I never found "The Frozen Dead" to be boring. I actually thought it was a pleasant enough page turner. Once I went with the flow and accepted this as a bit of fun as opposed to something more real or tangible, I was caught up in the story.

I feel like I was extremely critical of "The Frozen Dead" in my opening paragraph. What's interesting, though, is that I didn't dislike the book even with these fairly large reservations. I'm torn between giving this book three stars and four. I thought I was going to give it four stars when I started writing, but my own arguments have convinced me that three might be more appropriate. In the end, I don't think "The Frozen Dead" is a new classic. But it also isn't as bad as some might suggest. I was entertained by the story's progression and, as such, it succeeds as a lightweight entertainment. I never took it very seriously, though, and that undoubtedly aided in my enjoyment. KGHarris, 10/14.


Fellowes 3-Mil Letter ImageLast Glossy Laminating Pouches, 200 Pack (5244101)
Fellowes 3-Mil Letter ImageLast Glossy Laminating Pouches, 200 Pack (5244101)
Price: $34.68
8 used & new from $29.87

4.0 out of 5 stars Laminating Pouches That Perform Exactly As You Might Expect, January 21, 2015
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I'm expected to do a lot of laminating at work (store signs, important memos or charts) and yet work for a company that doesn't provide the supplies to do so. As a consequence, I'm always on the look-out for good deals. When I was offered the opportunity to try the Fellowes 3-Mil Letter ImageLast Glossy Laminating Pouches, I immediately came to the product page to check out the pricing. I normally use Scotch products but really have to search for bargains. The non-sale price for the Fellowes is certainly a hefty one (a subject-to-change $70) and not a cost I'd normally be comfortable with doling out for laminating sleeves. Granted 200 sleeves is a nice quantity that will last some time but it's still a little pricey for me. However, the discounted price (about 50% off) actually makes this a pretty sweet deal. At 17 cents a page, it makes a much more affordable option. My recommendation, therefore, is to keep looking for these sales if you are in the market for a like item.

That out of the way, I think the Fellowes product is a nice one. I like the 3-mil thickness range. For me, anything more is a bit unnecessary. I have found that they work fine in my laminator (which is not of the same brand and not particularly expensive). They have arrows to line you up, provide UV protection, and seal well and smoothly. As I hang signs in the window with frequency, the UV protection is a nice bonus to prevent fading.

Basically, these Laminating Pouches perform exactly as I would expect them to. It's difficult for me to rave about a practical product that does what it should. These are certainly a viable laminating option, especially if you can get them at a bargain. KGHarris, 1/15.


Too Bad to Die: A Novel
Too Bad to Die: A Novel
by Francine Mathews
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $21.28

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Fast And Fun WWII Spy Thriller Featuring A Fictionalized Ian Fleming, January 16, 2015
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Having created the iconic super spy James Bond, author Ian Fleming has become almost as famous for his fantastic exploits (both real and fictionalized) as his literary counterpart. Fleming served in the British Naval Intelligence service during the Second World War and has been the subject of countless biographies, feature and TV films, and stories based on events both factual and imagined. In "Too Bad To Die," author Francine Mathews places a fictional Fleming in the heart of the action as the Allied super powers gather to discuss strategies to end the war. What's at stake? Only the potential assassination of Churchill, Stalin, AND Roosevelt! Can Fleming save the day against all foes? I won't reveal the answer, but I wouldn't count him out even when the odds are stacked against him! "Too Bad To Die" is pure escapist fun. It has both brutality and a rather droll sense of humor and becomes an easy page turner. It may not be a new classic in the genre, but Mathews keeps events moving quickly so you'll rush forward to see what happens next. And really, that earns this adventure an easy recommendation.

The story centers around two close friends: Ian Fleming and Michael Hudson. The two became unlikely comrades at boarding school and each has now secured a place in their respective governments with Fleming consorting with Churchill's crew and Hudson in Roosevelt's camp. As the tale opens, we're introduced to a large cast of characters in Cairo as strategic plans are being prepared for an impending meeting with Stalin in Tehran. This is to be the most important moment in the war and everything is to be kept hush hush. Fleming becomes aware of a potential plot, as I previously mentioned, but struggles to gain additional information. When facts seem to point to someone in their immediate delegation being involved, it furthers complicates matters. Who can he trust? And will enough be revealed before it's too late? I won't go into more detail, except to say that the action heads to Tehran for its ultimately grisly finale.

Mathews has got a lot right in this tale of wartime intrigue. She depicts many real life figures with great color. The world leaders are fully fledged participants in this story! And I especially liked many of the female characters who seem to exist to be charmed by our hero. The dialogue is crisp and oftentimes amusing and can ground the story in its more outlandish elements. I simply had a good time reading "Too Bad To Die." I won't say it's a perfect book. The identity of the traitor in their midst is telegraphed fairly early as there aren't too many viable suspects. So there wasn't much surprise for me, but the twist is still executed well. Ironically, my least favorite aspect of the novel is its incorporation of Bond himself as Fleming's alter-ego. Mathews is a little too on-the-nose with this correlation and I didn't actually think the story needed the association. It's ultimately a small quibble, however, as it never took away my enjoyment. In the end, "Too Bad To Die" is a fun and fast read that I'd definitely pass on to fans of spy adventures or even alternate history. KGHarris, 1/15.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 10, 2015 6:26 PM PST


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