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Customer Reviews: 24
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Helpful Votes: 109




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James Palmer RSS Feed (Minneapolis, MN USA)
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Coleman Portable Motion-Sensor Light
Coleman Portable Motion-Sensor Light
Price: $19.29
7 used & new from $19.07

5.0 out of 5 stars Works well, October 19, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Works as advertised, and met my expectations.


Wingspan
Wingspan
Price: $6.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nice Story, April 20, 2014
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This review is from: Wingspan (Kindle Edition)
Many of us have read stories about the B-17 crews who fought and died flying out of Britain during WWII. This one has a nice twist which makes it an interesting story once again, about a principal character (can't really call him a hero) and his relationship with his American pilot father he has never met. It's a good read which moves right along, and is enjoyable all the way.

I've read a lot of WWII history, and remain perplexed by the "over sexed, over paid, and over here" British characterization of our American troops who risked their lives in B-17's, Omaha Beach, etc., for the greater good of our alliance with them. On the one hand, the British complained about the U.S. not entering the European war sooner, and on the other hand they complained about our troops who did come there after we entered the war, just before they died, along with the billions of dollars of aid we gave them. What would have pleased them, after all? Mr. Hughes brings up this quote again, but in a much better way this time which is as it should be.

Enjoy the book. It's a good story.


Weber 6525 Q Cart for Grilling
Weber 6525 Q Cart for Grilling
Price: $99.99
9 used & new from $99.98

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Harder to assemble than usual for Weber products, April 17, 2014
I've had a number of Weber products over the years, and like them a lot. One of their usual virtues is ease of assembly.

This grill, for the first time in my experience, is not so easy to put together. There are 8 long screws that must pass through holes in the legs and attach to threaded holes in the main support section. The holes are not aligned well, resulting in misaligned, cross-threaded screws that cannot be turned. With my electric drill I enlarged the holes in the legs, and after some cussing was able to finally get each of the 8 screws to be aligned so they could be fully installed. All is well now, but I only mention it because it is so unusual for the typical carefully assembled Weber kits.

Also, I agree with the previous comment that Weber product description should make it clear an adaptor hose (for using a 20 lb propane tank) is included in this kit. That was only apparent to me when the kit arrived, along with the separate adaptor hose I ordered.


Tivoli Audio M1BTCLA Model One BT Bluetooth AM/FM Radio (Walnut/Beige)
Tivoli Audio M1BTCLA Model One BT Bluetooth AM/FM Radio (Walnut/Beige)
Price: $259.00

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bluetooth May Not Be Good with Apple Devices, April 12, 2014
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I love this little radio. Cherry/silver version matches my kitchen, and looks great. The sound is terrific for such a small radio. If I had only bought the regular (non-Bluetooth) version for about $110 less I would have given it 5+ stars.

As some others have said, connecting Apple devices to the Bluetooth version can be frustrating. While Tivoli advertises easy "auto-connect" to up to eight Bluetooth devices, I immediately had problems with an iPhone 5 and an iPad Air, both running the latest iOS7.1. I could connect the iPhone 5 at first, and auto connect seemed to work once the pairing was established after a number of tries. Then I tried to connect an iPad Air and had lots of problems with pairing and connecting. Others here have correctly pointed out that one device has to be unpaired before another can be paired/connected, and that was confirmed in an email to Tivoli. After a while I could do neither with the iPad. That's not really "auto connecting."

I contacted Tivoli again, and they arranged for a UPS round trip shipment for me to return mine. Apparently they do some kind of a software update to the radios (like mine) which need it. I just got mine back. Now the pairing seems to last with at least two devices, the pairing was easier, and I can connect both, but have to use their Bluetooth control in Settings to do it. That's not quite "auto connect," but it's not too bad either.

Conclusions: I'm a huge fan of buying things like this through Amazon, but I think I might have received a more up-to-date version of this radio by buying directly from Tivoli. This time I think I got one (without up-to-date software) that may have been in stock at one of Amazon's suppliers for some time. The "auto connect" feature doesn't really work as promised, at least on Apple devices. And Tivoli should make that clear in their ads. Otherwise you may have to buy one and then be without it for about two weeks while returning it to Tivoli and they make it work as well as it can. I do give them credit for their making that easy to do. I really do like this little radio, but think if Tivoli is going to ask about $110 extra for their Bluetooth version, it ought to work better than it does.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 9, 2014 5:29 AM PDT


The Age of Radiance: The Epic Rise and Dramatic Fall of the Atomic Era
The Age of Radiance: The Epic Rise and Dramatic Fall of the Atomic Era
Offered by Simon and Schuster Digital Sales Inc
Price: $12.99

11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Left Out a Success Story, April 8, 2014
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I agree with the other reviewers who were put off by the excessive quotes. However, my main disappointment with this book is that in making the "two-faces" of nuclear energy conclusion of his book, oddly Nelson made only passing reference to a true success story in using nuclear power: the U.S. Navy's nuclear powered ships.

Ever since the submarine Nautilus first went to sea in 1955, our Navy has had stellar performance from its nuclear propulsion plants in submarines, aircraft carriers, and cruisers. Started by Admiral Rickover, a tradition of excellence in construction and training has led to reliability and safety. Design innovations such as reactors that will last as long as half the 50-year lifetime of a nuclear aircraft carrier, without refueling, are taken for granted. Nelson barely mentioned naval reactors at all, yet they account for the majority of reactors our country has ever built.

In attempting to weigh the scales of the good (mainly only citing medical uses) against the bad (waste, Chernobyl, Fukushima, Three Mile Island) he leaves out a success story that would help his two-faces of the "atomic era" balance better. It may be that Nelson ignored this because he may think it is just the Navy, and not of general interest. That would be a mistake, because excellence is excellence. With outstanding results in all of the naval reactors, the conclusion is clear that nuclear power can work well. Even Tom Friedman noted this performance excellence in one of his columns this week, written after a trip on a nuclear submarine. Strange that Nelson pretty much ignored this positive aspect of nuclear energy application.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 25, 2014 5:27 AM PDT


Rush (Blu-ray + DVD + Digital HD UltraViolet)
Rush (Blu-ray + DVD + Digital HD UltraViolet)
DVD ~ Daniel Brühl
Price: $12.49
63 used & new from $7.94

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Why Do I Have to Pay for Commercials?, March 8, 2014
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I love this movie. The four star rating is for this Blu-Ray disc. When I pay $20 for a Blu-Ray disc, why do I have to endure several previews before the movie ever starts. Paying for a disc should free one from this annoyance. Blu-Ray discs are slowly giving way to streaming movies. This has to be one of the reasons for it.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 10, 2014 9:55 AM PDT


Coast to Coast Path: British Walking Guide With 109 Large-Scale Walking Maps, Places To Stay, Places To Eat
Coast to Coast Path: British Walking Guide With 109 Large-Scale Walking Maps, Places To Stay, Places To Eat
by Henry Stedman
Edition: Paperback
16 used & new from $25.06

5.0 out of 5 stars Nothing Like It, September 12, 2013
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I did the Coast to Coast Walk nearly five years ago. Stedman's book was very helpful at the time, both for preparation and guidance. That book was in pretty bad shape when I finished (my fault). In a recent fit of nostalgia I bought an up to date version for my library. Browsing through it reminded me of what an extraordinarily useful book it is.


Citizens of London: The Americans Who Stood with Britain in Its Darkest, Finest Hour
Citizens of London: The Americans Who Stood with Britain in Its Darkest, Finest Hour
by Lynne Olson
Edition: Paperback
Price: $10.64
149 used & new from $5.00

4.0 out of 5 stars Actually About the Declining British Empire vs Emerging U.S. Leadership, August 23, 2013
A very interesting book, but unnecessarily long. The author's description of the the three principal characters, Winant, Harriman, and Murrow, and how it was to live in London during WWII, makes it a very worthwhile read. However, she should have stopped there, and not tried to summarize the rest of the war in Europe. That's been done much better, and more thoroughly, by others.

Who would imagine the closeness of Winant, Harriman and Murrow to Churchill's family members Olson describes? And she does a particularly good service by emphasizing what a wonderful Ambassador we sent to the British during that awful time. It now seems like Gil Winant is remembered better there than here in the U.S.

The underlying thread that ties the book together, to me, is the concurrent story of the decline of the British Empire and the rise of the U.S. as a world power. It was a tough pill for the British to swallow. First, the British criticized the U.S. for not leaping to their aid even before we entered the war. Then they were unhappy with the many Americans who were there to help once we were in it. Throughout, senior British officers criticized the U.S. conduct of the war, driving Ike to distraction, even though many of their own endeavors were not successes. All of this was part of the changing leadership role they hated to see, and can be understood in that light.


The Cuckoo's Calling (Cormoran Strike Book 1)
The Cuckoo's Calling (Cormoran Strike Book 1)
Offered by Hachette Book Group
Price: $12.99

5.0 out of 5 stars J.K.R. is a master story-teller, July 25, 2013
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I enjoyed this book. J.K. Rowling is a master at keeping the reader interested and turning-pages rapidly. She does a great job of making the large number of characters individually memorable, so it's easy to remember each one. Most of all, I enjoy the way she leaves questions in your mind early on, and then fills in the answers as the book progresses. My favorite technique, and not many authors do it so well.


Savage Continent: Europe in the Aftermath of World War II
Savage Continent: Europe in the Aftermath of World War II
Offered by Macmillan
Price: $9.99

27 of 38 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Tainted by Anti-U.S. bias, May 31, 2013
Kudos to Keith Lowe for undertaking a very worthwhile project. He has described a period of European history which has been mostly ignored over the years. I wanted to like this book, but was disappointed by Lowe's obvious anti-U.S. bias.

In comparison, Rick Atkinson's more recent "The Guns at Last Light" provided an excellent unbiased view in describing the U.S. and British efforts to end the war with the Germans. The war in 1944/45 was a huge undertaking, and mistakes were made by both the British and the U.S. along the way. Yet Atkinson told the story fairly, even about Field Marshal Montgomery's foibles. If Lowe had been as objective as Atkinson, his book would have been far better. However, if he could find an anecdote unfavorable to the U.S., Lowe put it in. But, never one about the Brits. Were they really that perfect?

The U.S. and British prisoner of war camps each had around 3 million prisoners. In Lowe's biggest reach, he compared deaths in the U.S. versus British camps. In both cases German deaths were around 1%, with about 3,000 more in the U.S. camps. There are a number of possible reasons for these additional deaths (location and condition of prisoners when captured, British surprise refusal to accept more prisoners, etc.) which do not necessarily reflect badly on the U.S. Yet Lowe then went on to make a big thing of that small difference, saying it showed the U.S., from President Roosevelt on down, were particularly hateful toward Germans (Even more than the RAF's "Bomber" Harris?). He supported that by quoting a little gallows humor by Roosevelt to Stalin after a well-oiled dinner at Yalta. Atkinson's book included the same anecdote, but did not draw the same preposterous conclusion from it.

It's OK to be critical (as Atkinson also was in his book), but when it becomes clear the author is grinding an axe for his personal biases then the book loses value. If you are an American, you can try to ignore his bias and read it anyway. You will probably learn something from his prodigious research. But just think how much better the book would be if Lowe had told the story as impartially as Atkinson did in his.
Comment Comments (11) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 6, 2013 12:45 PM PDT


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