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BlueRigger High Speed HDMI Cable with Ethernet 6.6 Feet (2m) - Supports 3D and Audio Return [Latest Version]
BlueRigger High Speed HDMI Cable with Ethernet 6.6 Feet (2m) - Supports 3D and Audio Return [Latest Version]
Offered by BlueRigger
Price: $14.95
7 used & new from $0.50

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Followed Up With Annoying E-Mail Request For Me to Review Product, June 7, 2011
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I actually have no comment on the product. I'm writing simply to report that after ordering this product I got an annnoying email from Bluerigger asking me to review it here. The worst part? There was no link for me to hit to be removed from their email system.


Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them
Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them
by Al Franken
Edition: Hardcover
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5.0 out of 5 stars SHOULD BE REQUIRED READING, September 12, 2003
Al Franken's book is well written, but not superbly written. It has some sections that would best be left out. But Franken's analysis of right-wing demagogues should not be missed. His detailed proof of repeated lies told by O'Reilly, Coulter, Hannity, Limbaugh, Bush and Cheney is damning and should be required reading for anyone who puts their trust in these individuals.
Tellingly, not one person, not one, has yet exposed any untruth allegedly told by Franken in this book. That says it all, for we must know that the right wing is pouring over this masterpiece in detail trying to expose even the slightest fib. Note how even the people who trash this book as "lies" in their reviews here fail to specify even one alleged lie.
Why is Fox and the right so up in arms about this book? Because the truth hurts, bad.


Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time
Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time
by Dava Sobel
Edition: Paperback
610 used & new from $0.01

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Scientific Tale That Reads Like A Novel, December 18, 2002
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"Longitude" is unique in that it tells a tale that intrigues, entertains, informs, shocks and amuses, all at once. Sobel's description of the longitude problem and proposed solutions are both capably written and easily understandable. But the real excitement in Sobel's account isin the characters portrayed. Given its subject matter, one might expect "Longitude" to be nothing more than a recitation of scientific principles, theories, and proofs. Instead, Sobel tells the intriguing story of a brilliant man who suffered constant insults and inequities, but perservered. The villians in this story are almost too conniving and evil to be real; the heroes almost too pure and naive to be true. Nevertheless, Sobel presents these individuals with omnipresent detachment, allowing their actions to speak for themselves. The result is an extremely enjoyable (but alas too short!) account of a fascinating scientific problem and engrossing personal interplay.


So Far From God: The U. S. War With Mexico, 1846–1848
So Far From God: The U. S. War With Mexico, 1846–1848
by John S. D. Eisenhower
Edition: Paperback
Price: $15.40
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Wonderful Book on the Military Aspects of the Mexican War, June 5, 2001
Eisenhower's intriguing military history opens with a hard-hitting quote from a late nineteenth century Mexican president: "Poor Mexico! So far from God, yet so close to the United States!" The subsequent pages of Eisenhower's account develop the caustic truth of this statement in vivid detail. Eisenhower depicts the military expeditions and dominance of the US forces with great skill. Relying on both American and Mexican sources, including many first-hand accounts, Eisenhower brings the reader from Texas to northern Mexico, from New Mexico to California, and finally from Veracruz to Mexico City itself. The journey is a worthwhile one. Helpful maps and illustrations support Eisenhower's description of each battle. The military historian will be rewarded from reading this account. The military novice will as well.
To his credit, Eisenhower refrains from joining the acrimonious debate over whether the USA took untoward advantage of Mexico by provoking war. Nevertheless, the pertinent events and subsequent interpretations of those events are detailed for the reader to make up his/her own mind.


America Afire: Jefferson, Adams, and the Revolutionary Election of 1800
America Afire: Jefferson, Adams, and the Revolutionary Election of 1800
by Bernard A. Weisberger
Edition: Hardcover
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Embers Still Glow, March 6, 2001
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America Afire's portrayal of late 18th Century America is sure to fascinate anyone with even a minimal interest in American history. Adams, Jefferson, Hamilton and Burr leap from the pages of Weisberger's descriptive, yet unassuming prose. The events depicted are fascinating. The development of the democratic ideals that we now take for granted is particularly compelling.
Perhaps even more intriguing is America Afire's adept depiction of the "unfatherly" behavior and attitudes of our founding fathers. Their views and actions are often unsettling, and sometimes downright frightening. America Afire dispels with the myth that the originators of the American Constitution were beyond petty politics and biased interpretations of the Constitution they had just written. They often felt and expressed vile hatred for each other - much beyond anything that the American public would tolerate today. As Weisberger ably demonstrates, this pettiness almost destroyed our nation in its infancy.
I will leave for the reader the factual particulars of Weisberger's account. The pages read like a novel, and even the most ardent student of American history is likely to learn many interesting tidbits regarding our nation's earliest days. This book should be read by every American high school student. American Afire brings our early history alive.


Embattled Selves: An Investigation into the Nature of Identity Through Oral Histories of Holocaust Survivors
Embattled Selves: An Investigation into the Nature of Identity Through Oral Histories of Holocaust Survivors
by Ken Jacobson
Edition: Hardcover
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5.0 out of 5 stars Who To Be Or Not To Be - THAT Is The Question, September 26, 2000
Through absorbing biographies of Holocaust survivors, Embattled Selves explores issues of identity that transcend the Holocaust itself. Each of the fifteen individuals studied in the book underwent some challenge to their identity during the war. Some were Jewish, but disguised themselves as Christian. Others were half-Jewish and had to come to terms with, or reject, their part-Jewish heritage. Still others did not even know they were Jewish (or part-Jewish) until the war forced their lineage to the forefront. The manner in which these individuals dealt with their identities both during the war and afterwards is fascinating and thought-provoking.
The success of Embattled Selves results directly from the manner in which Jacobson presents these remarkable individuals. The author permits each survivor to relate his/her own story through oral testimony. Jacobson's impartial narrative introduces the separate topics, and explains certain terminology, but in no way seeks to dominate the accounts. The reader is allowed to explore and ponder the issues raised at his own pace with a trusted guide at his side. What makes people who they are? Why do certain inviduals embrace their heritage while others reject it? What effect does the attitudes of parents, friends, and loved ones have on an individual's sense of identity? Can a person ever really abandon an identity? Or does a repressed identity live on? What impact does the desire to belong have on an individual's attitude towards a "minority" identity?
To its credit, Embattled Selves does not seek to provide definitive answers to any of these questions. The final examination is left to the reader, who may discover previously ignored issues of identity in his/her own life.


The First World War
The First World War
by John Keegan
Edition: Paperback
Price: $11.41
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24 of 28 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Trench Warfare, Through and Through, August 1, 2000
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This review is from: The First World War (Paperback)
Let me start by noting that John Keegan undertook a daunting task in attempting to describe the entirety of World War I in a single volume. Many notable accounts of the war focus on a single aspect of WWI, e.g., the battles of 1914, the Zimmerman telegram, the collapse of the central powers, etc. Keegan takes this all on and more. The result is an often absorbing, but sometimes monotonous and sometimes confusing account.
Keegan's writing exhibits a mastery of both the major events and the subtle nuances of the war. He describes the military, political, and socio-economic climate in perceptive detail, and does this for all the combatents. The reader will surely learn a great deal by tackling this book.
Nevertheless, the book suffers from two serious flaws, only one of which perhaps was within Keegan's direct control. First, the book is seriously lacking in maps. For example, the entire book contains just four maps for the entire Western Front. Many pivotal towns are simply missing from the all-to-general maps. Many battles in minor theaters have no accompanying maps at all. As a result, the narrative is often difficult to follow. Second, given the static nature of the fronts in World War I and the generally consistent military strategy during the war, the desciption of each battle is more or less a repeat of the last. The narrative separating the descripions of the battles is also somewhat repetitive, resulting in a sometimes tedious read. I often found myself looking ahead to the next section.
All in all, the reader of The First World War will certainly be rewarded by completing Keegan's informative account. Unfortunately, however, the book often reads more like a textbook then a "live" history.


Day of Confession
Day of Confession
by Allan R. Folsom
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: $26.94
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I Confess: This Book Should Have Been Better, June 26, 2000
True, this book is not as engrossing as The Day After Tomorrow. The plot is more predictable and to a certain extent repetitive. That said, Day of Confession is still an enjoyable read. If it were not for the expectations following The Day After Tomorrow ("TDAT"), I'm sure the reader ratings for this book would be higher.
Once again, as in TDAT, the reader should be ready to be shot out of the box from page one. Folsom paints on a broad canvas stretching three continents and multiple characters. He is obviously quite talented in both imagination and organization. Many seemingly irrelevant points become relevant on later pages. Many seemingly unrelated storylines are proven later to be one in the same. Despite the book's flaws, I found myself eager to pick up the book and continue reading.
I would simply warn the reader not to expect the day after The Day After Tomorrow.


Galileo's Daughter: A Historical Memoir of Science, Faith and Love
Galileo's Daughter: A Historical Memoir of Science, Faith and Love
by Dava Sobel
Edition: Hardcover
220 used & new from $0.01

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Fine Work Better Titled: "Galileo and His Daughter", May 26, 2000
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Despite this book's title, it is more a biography of Galileo enhanced by actual letters from his daughter than a biography of the daughter herself. Yet, the lives of the two were specially connected. She was every bit a part of his life; he composed the major part of hers.
Sister Maria Celeste (the daughter) lived the majority of her life restricted to the grounds of a convent outside of Florence. She only saw Galileo when he came to visit her. Consequently, her letters to her father take the form of a omnipotent narrative. The author capably intersperses these letters to relate periods in Galileo's life. Although his letters to his daughter have unfortunately been lost, this fact, in my opinion, actually increases the intrigue of the book. Galileo lives through his actions and through the words of his most loving observer, his daughter. Beyond this basic framework, the book provides a compelling tale of Galileo's scientific discoveries, his struggles with the Catholic Church, and his personal fortitude. Galileo is presented as the pioneer of a new methodology in scientific discovery - learning through observation, postulation, and experimentation; not mere philosophical meandering. His struggle for acceptance of what is observable, instead of what may be theoretically preferable, is a struggle that continues to this day. At the same time, the author details interesting aspects of the daughters conventary lifestyle, and illustrates the political and social issues of the time. Most importantly, however, final judgment regarding Galileo, his character, and his treatment by the church is left to the reader. This book is well-deserving of all its praise and certainly worth a read.


No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II
No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II
by Doris Kearns Goodwin
Edition: Paperback
Price: $14.50
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Unprecedented Account of the Roosevelts and Their Time, April 21, 2000
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No Ordinary Time presents a compelling social history of both Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt and the development of American society during the war years. Both are exposed for their flaws and both are extolled for their virtues. Doris Kearns Goodwin interweaves an impressive array of primary resource material in chronicalling international and domestic developments. For example, the emotional ups and downs of the Allied war effort are counterposed with excerpts from the diary of Nazi propaganda leader Joseph Goebbels. The progressive views and policies of the Roosevelt administration are aptly pitted with letters to the White House demonstrating the stubborn racism and apathy of many in WWII American society. In the end, Goodwin paints an illustrative picture of both the Roosevelts and their time -- with wonderful accounts of events and attitudes that will surprise a number of readers.
Because of Goodwin's approach, the book is equally valuable for what is says about the Roosevelts as what it says about American society during WWII. The Roosevelt marraige is displayed in all its beauty and ugliness. Goodwin aptly demonstrates the irony of the live of the Roosevelts: while they strove ceaselessly to improve the lives of every Amercian, they often manipulated and harmed the very people closest to them, especially each other.
At the same time, through splendid research and organization, Goodwin follows America's attitudes on such varied subjects as race, gender equality, labor relations, politics, and the war production effort. No item of domestic concern seems overlooked. In her portrayal of domestic developments, Goodwin chronicles the true beginning of modern American society. And once again, as with her descriptions of the Roosevelts, Goodwin does not hesitate to present American society in all its glory and shame. The wonders of American ingenuity and dedication are countered with the ugliness of the Japanese-American internments and racial biases.
Goodwin's account is simply a unique piece of history. While most authors would be unable to portray either the Roosevelts or American society in such brilliant detail, Goodwin pulls both off together in a seemless and impressive account. It is no wonder that this book won the Pulitzer Prize.


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