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The Dark Art: My Undercover Life in Global Narco-terrorism
The Dark Art: My Undercover Life in Global Narco-terrorism
by Douglas Century
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $20.97
65 used & new from $13.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars VERY GOOD, October 11, 2014
Agent Follis tells the story of his career in a breezy manner, hitting the high spots only. If there is drudgery and mind numbing duties involved in his job, you won't find out about it here. And that's fine with me. All of us know that every job has its tedious side. Follis relates his philosophy of working undercover: how do you fool paranoid and terribly violent people? How do you survive? He tells of some agents who did not survive.
A fascinating part of this book is his description of some of the top narcotics criminals in the world. They are filthy rich and savagely dangerous. But someone has to go after them. Follis was one of the men who did just that. A very good book.


The Most Dangerous Man in America: The Making of Douglas MacArthur
The Most Dangerous Man in America: The Making of Douglas MacArthur
by Mark Perry
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $21.11
86 used & new from $5.88

75 of 80 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dangerous to America's Enemies, March 24, 2014
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I have read several books concerning General Douglas MacArthur. A few have been scathing, giving him hell for just about everything he did (the author Stanley Weintraub does not think much of him) some are admiring (William Manchester comes to mind). Mark Perry, in this excellent book, does not fall under either category. He looks at the record and the relationship between MacArthur and President Franklin Roosevelt and Army Chief of Staff George Marshal and calls the shots as he sees them. He obviously believes that all three of these men were good men and talented men. They needed each other during hard times. They helped form each others' characters and ideas. In the end, MacArthur was brilliant as a military commander, perhaps even a genius, all the while earning the anger of other people with his arrogance and near paranoia that others were against him. Perry has done a great job of separating the faults of the man from his sometimes astonishing successes. We are lucky that he took the time to do so and then write this book.
Comment Comments (10) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 1, 2014 2:13 PM PDT


A Million Ways to Die in the West
A Million Ways to Die in the West
by Seth MacFarlane
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $15.63
113 used & new from $2.09

2 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars AWFUL, March 11, 2014
Unfortunately, this book is simply awful. It consists of about two hundred pages in which people do stupid things that are not all that funny. One spoiler: A guy who has a prostitute for a girlfriend and he takes pride in how professional she is even though she won't have sex with him because of her religion. The gag lines are funny the first couple of times the guy and his girlfriend appear, but they grow stale fast. Outside of the fact that this book is written to resemble one of the old dime novel westerns, and it takes place in a western town in the 1880s, it really isn't much of a western novel. The whole thing could have easily been transplanted to the 1930s or the 1960s or '90s without losing much in the way of story. This is comedy, but there should be some authenticity in an "old west" story.


Babe Ruth's Called Shot: The Myth And Mystery Of Baseball's Greatest Home Run
Babe Ruth's Called Shot: The Myth And Mystery Of Baseball's Greatest Home Run
by Ed Sherman
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $17.67
51 used & new from $12.80

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, March 4, 2014
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Maybe I expected too much from this book, but there is nothing new here. The matter in question (did Babe
Ruth predict he was going to hit a homerun by pointing to an area past the outfield fences, then hit a home run?) is not answered here. The first part of the book describes the greatness of Ruth as a baseball man (and he was great, if not the greatest) as well as the Yankees ball club in general. If you are already familiar with Ruth and the Yankees of his era, this section will not light your fire. The second part of the book describes the homerun incident in detail without resolving the main question. The third part prints the opinions of lots of people who were there. If you have never heard of the "called shot" before, this might be interesting to read, but do not expect any questions to be answered.


Eliot Ness: The Rise and Fall of an American Hero
Eliot Ness: The Rise and Fall of an American Hero
by Douglas Perry
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $20.17
101 used & new from $3.25

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good Man with a Lot of Faults, February 21, 2014
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This biography is excellent. It is the story of a good man and a good cop, incorruptible, intelligent, and hard working. Mr Perry lays down the facts about Elliot Ness, who has been both glamorized and ridiculed over time. Ness did not take down Al Capone, but he did make life harder for Capone. That was more than a lot of law enforcement people were willing to risk doing in Capone's heyday. Then Ness took on the job of public safety director (police chief basically) in an extremely corrupt city. He performed his duties very well there, also. But, there were problems, too. Ness, the prohibition gangbuster, died an alcoholic. Ness, the image of the all American Sunday School boy, was a womanizer. The author tells this story rather quickly and with zest. Ness did not deserve all the glamour attached to his name, but he most certainly does not deserve to be ridiculed. This is the book to read and find out why.


Easy Go (Hard Case Crime)
Easy Go (Hard Case Crime)
by John Lange
Edition: Paperback
Price: $8.78
73 used & new from $2.94

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Easy Go is an easy read., November 17, 2013
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This is a book to pick up on a lazy day when you want something interesting to read, but you don't expect the story to be gripping.
The characters are stereotypical-rich guy who spends his time worrying about his creature comforts but is willing to fund some illegal enterprises more for the thrill of it than the profit; the dedicated but frustrated archaeologist; the jaded reporter; the beautiful, brilliant female love interest; the tough guy who "gets things done". It is all about finding and looting a pharaoh's tomb. The story moves quickly, the plotting is simple, and there is some real suspense as to whether or not they will get away with it. Good for an easy afternoon.


Gangster Squad: Covert Cops, the Mob, and the Battle for Los Angeles
Gangster Squad: Covert Cops, the Mob, and the Battle for Los Angeles
by Paul Lieberman
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $20.58
54 used & new from $0.03

24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fast History, August 11, 2012
This is the true story of a group of hard headed cops going up against a group of hard headed criminals in the 1940's and 1950's. There was so much going on in those decades inside the Los Angeles Police Department and inside the criminal world and between the two groups that this book never lags in interest. It is necessarily also the story of early LA and the early corruption in the police department, along with the efforts to make things right among the police. It is the story of the wars inside organized crime in LA, the murderous competition for illegal profit and power. This was before the era of the Miranda warning and other court decisons limiting what the police could do, but the public still cared about how the police operated and the police managed to get into trouble often with their tactics. At the same time, the public knew their cops were up against a vicious, corrupting element, and they wanted their police to win. The Gangster Squad, operating in this pressure cooker of criticism and cheering, fought for "small victories", trying to wear down the bosses of organized crime. Read the book and find out how it all ended. It is a whirlwind read and eye opening on the subject of law enforcement in American big cities fifty years ago.


Kearny's March: The Epic Creation of the American West, 1846-1847
Kearny's March: The Epic Creation of the American West, 1846-1847
by Winston Groom
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $20.69
121 used & new from $0.01

11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "Print the Legend", December 29, 2011
This book is well done history, but it is not scholarly. No research notes, no revelations, no new interpretations. Mr. Groom himself states that he relied on the research performed by other historians to write this book. "Kearney's March" tells the story of legends such as the Donner Party, John Fremont, and the suffering of the Mormons, and he gives us the hard facts about them. So many famous people were on the move and going to war in the years 1846 and 1847. Dozens of books have been written about them and their time. What Mr. Groom does is bring those famous people, those legends, together in one fast paced book and tells us what was going on. In the John Ford/John Wayne movie "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance" the editor says, "This is the West. When the legend becomes fact, print the legend."
Mr. Groom gives us both. We get the facts about the legends.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 25, 2012 10:04 AM PST


Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History
Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History
by S. C. Gwynne
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $22.29
114 used & new from $5.00

570 of 601 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great History--Both Brutal and Warm, June 1, 2010
Mr Gwynne has written a masterpiece. It is the story, first, of a deadly land: Endless miles of grassland with no shelter and almost no water. People died from the heat, thirst, lightning strikes, and simply from getting lost and giving up hope in an enormous area, every acre so alike in appearance that it was like looking at the water of an ocean. The primary story is of the people who wanted this deadly land and who were willing to kill for it. The Spanish. The Mexicans. The Apaches. The Comanches. The Texans. All of these people were tough and stubborn. They believed in vengeance and they went after it.
Mr Gwynne does not take sides. He describes the ruthlessness and savagery of all involved, he tells what happened and allows the reader to make his own decisions and retroactively take whatever side he wants to. But Gwynne does more than tell of people's violence. He shows the same people at home, caring and fun loving.
Chief Parker, Cynthia Parker, Ranger Hays, Colonel Mackenzie, and several others were fascinating people and Gwynne makes them real to our modern eyes. It is evident that he admires them all, for their toughness and their determination and their courage. After reading this excellent book, most of us will admire them all, too.
Comment Comments (20) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 6, 2012 6:07 PM PDT


Patton's Drive: The Making of America's Greatest General
Patton's Drive: The Making of America's Greatest General
by Alan Axelrod
Edition: Hardcover
56 used & new from $0.52

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars EXCELLENT, September 26, 2009
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Well written and obviously the result of some heavy duty research. It is not just about Patton's early life, though. Quite a bit of his WWII success is covered, but it is related to how Patton prepared himself for war. This is the real Patton behind the rough, flashy public exterior. This is the story of a man who was not just naturally brilliant, but studied constantly, always wanting to learn, always wanting to improve his knowledge. There are some lessons here for anyone who wants to be the best.


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