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KMC MISSING LINK Bicycle Chain Link (9-Speed, 6-Pack)
KMC MISSING LINK Bicycle Chain Link (9-Speed, 6-Pack)
Price: $9.19
29 used & new from $4.00

5.0 out of 5 stars Just great, July 2, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: KMC MissingLink (Sports)
fits perfectly and I'm a big guy, so i can report its strong. it goes in my emergency bike pouch. So far all KMC branded chain items have worked out well and the quality of the materials are solid.


Cellet Super Strong Maximum Protection Body Guard (Full Body) for Apple iPhone 4
Cellet Super Strong Maximum Protection Body Guard (Full Body) for Apple iPhone 4
Price: $5.81
12 used & new from $0.01

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Worth it, July 2, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
It's great. I had the invishield before and this one is indisdinguishible from it in terms of aesthetics, quality and feel. Anyone that has issues with it bubbling, this is what i do for any screen protector type installation - put purified water and a little dish soap in a spray bottle and mist my finger tips. then i mist the screen protector. align one corner and carefully place on the screen. then i take a credit card and start scraping the excess liquid to the sides being careful to absorb moisture with a towel. after a few hours if there are any bubbles, just scrape them off.

It's good to have the extra protection because I resell things like my iPad and iPhone when i upgrade to the newer model.


BLUE PU MAGNET SMART SLIM CASE COVER FOR APPLE IPAD 2
BLUE PU MAGNET SMART SLIM CASE COVER FOR APPLE IPAD 2

4.0 out of 5 stars Works for me, July 2, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
So its not the genuine Apple product and after nearly half a year the top blue layer is starting to seperate (or bubble) from the rest of itself. Considering I paid only about 10 bucks for it I think that's great since I'll most likely upgrade my iPad before this one becomes unusable. Even if I do keep my current iPad I'd would want to swap colors for a change of pace and if I do that I'm still well under what one Apple Smart case would have cost.

The other thing is the magnets aren't as strong as the Apple one's but I could only tell when they were side by side. Otherwise day-to-day it serves its purpose.


Master Lock 8290DPS 22-inch 9-Link Street Cuffs Lock
Master Lock 8290DPS 22-inch 9-Link Street Cuffs Lock
Price: $45.00
38 used & new from $36.00

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The weird looks are a good thing, July 2, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I get weird looks when I whip it out to lock my road bike and a lock that looks confusing for a bike is an added deterent in my opinion. In my mind, a thief wants to to make things as quick as possible and since these things aren't as widely popular than the U-lock they are more likely to skip it. It's thick and solid. Rotation of the links are good to prevent getting the proper leverage to break as well as providing enough fiddle room to lock it to objects that a typical u-lock might not. Carrying it is sometimes cumbersome and it is heavy but not weightier than the kryptonite new york faghetaboutit series and that's the one you want if you go u-lock. otherwise, this definitely would require power tools to break, has more uses (wink) and is half the price.


Sony Alpha SLT-A57 16.1 MP Exmor APS HD CMOS Sensor DSLR with Translucent Mirror Technology and 3D Sweep Panorama (Body Only)
Sony Alpha SLT-A57 16.1 MP Exmor APS HD CMOS Sensor DSLR with Translucent Mirror Technology and 3D Sweep Panorama (Body Only)
Offered by DavisMAX
Price: $579.00
11 used & new from $349.00

23 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sony a57 is almost perfect, July 2, 2012
So it goes, "a picture's worth a thousand words." It looks like Sony remembered that video is the master of pictures in motion. That's my take on Sony's new mid-range A-mount camera in it's Alpha series. The Sony SLT A57 is a fast, quality camera with impressive video capturing capabilities.

RECAP: A DSLR (digital single lens reflex) is the digital version of the same flipping mirror technology that has dominated serious photography of the past half-century. You look into a view finder and when you snap a picture, the mirror that you were actually looking at flips out of the way so a sensor can make a copy of what you saw. Sony, with it's SLT line, fuses a forgotten technology with it's background in electronics to make a completely innovative camera that threatens the royal DSLR family of Canon and Nikon.

Instead of a flipping mirror, the a57 uses a semi-transparent one that doesn't need to flip which enables this $700 camera to take rapid 8 (full control), 10 (aperture control), and all the way up to 12 (cropped resolution) frames per second. In this respect, the transparent mirror is allowing Sony's SLT cameras to compete with others 4x it's price. That stationary mirror is paired with an acclaimed 16.1 megapixel CMOS sensor that has a very fast phase detection auto focus.

The A57 has all the other details a DSLR would afford you. The things that work especially well are its ISO performance, up to 16000 for quality in low light conditions. It has a host of fun borderline gimmicky options like auto-portrait framing where the Bionz processor takes a look at a photo and crops it using the rule of thirds. The in camera digital zoom works unexpectedly well allowing my kit lens to get some respectable macro shots. It houses a larger battery than it's predecessor, the well-received A55, allowing up to 550 shots on a fresh charge. Memory Pro Duo and SD cards (class 10 recommended for keeping up with a57`s decent buffer) are accepted in the larger rubberized grip.

Sony's newest offering is larger than the model it replaces inspiring confidence that the company was listening to customer feedback. It turns out mid-range DSLR customers didn't want smaller and delicate in their models but something more substantial with plenty of grip options and spaced out controls for one-handed activation for most features. Sony's live view has been excellent since it entered the DSLR market after acquiring all things Minolta. It's fully articulated though it's majorly annoying that it's hinged on the bottom, which means even on a tripod it's difficult to do self capturing. The electronic view finder (since its not a true DSLR, no flipping mirror remember, everything's recreated digitally) is easy to use and greatly enhanced from the A55, though still no OLED inherited from the higher end A65 and A77.

If you have a collection of Minolta Lenses or have one of the first few Sony Alphas that didn't record video, then the A57 represents digital SLR movie making in it's prime and now would make right for an upgrade. Video capture is where Sony's camera shines utilizng its in-body camera stabliziation (they call it Steady Shot) and its constant phase detection auto focus. Regardless of price, few DSLR's can compete with how fast and accurate the A57 is when recording in movie mode. There's no flipping mirror so auto focus is never turned off or in need of readjustment unless you want full shutter and aperture control. For indie film makers, probably the most important thing of note is that Sony's new SLTs record in full 1080p at 60 frames per second and now also 24 progressive frames a second. The A57 records video at a bitrate up to 28 mbps which is a bit less than a hacked Panasonic GH2 or Canon's T3i but neither do 60 at 1080p. Unless your going to do extensive and repeated digital manipulation to your videos, my opinion is 28 mbps is of very high quality. In any case, shooting video with a DSLR and the many lenses that offer up a shallow depth of field can yield expensive looking results.

There's a lot of fanboy-ism when affiliations are made to a camera manufacturer. Nikon and Canon make excellent products in the DSLR market, Panasonic does well with its micro four thirds system and Sony's stronghold as underdog may well change with it's SLT line of semi-transparent mirrors. With any of the above you get large image sensors and full manual control options over exposures which is why they yield better results than cheaper point and shoots or typical smart phone affairs. In my opinion, what it really boils down to are the lenses. Not the mirrors, definitely not the megapixels and not the brand's name. If you have a bunch of Canon or Nikon lenses then stick with Canon or Nikon. However, if you have old Minolta lenses (don't forget all Minolta Maxxum A-mounts work with all Sony A-mounts) or are starting from scratch then consider the A57. Like all Sony Alpha DSLR and SLTs, it has both in body stabilization (negating the need for the more expensive stabilized lenses) and a built-in auto-focus motor. The last two things simply mean that you could save money in the long run if you plan on buying a few more lenses.

Did any of this make any Flipping sense?

After a few months of use I am finding the lack of on board audio controls with no choice but the auto gain to be inconvinient now that I do more video work. Recording audio separately is usually best anyways and the onboard stereo mic work well for syncing but it would be nice to throw a rode video mic pro or sony's own ecmalst1 and not worry about picking up the camera's motor noise. Half a star knock for that, otherwise I'm still super happy with it.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Dec 6, 2012 7:45 AM PST


Apple MacBook Pro MC975LL/A 15.4-Inch Laptop with Retina Display (OLD VERSION)
Apple MacBook Pro MC975LL/A 15.4-Inch Laptop with Retina Display (OLD VERSION)
57 used & new from $1.00

50 of 56 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Should you buy?, July 2, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
There is only one Macbook Pro to consider getting this season and it's the Retina Version. The question is if you need to. I've had enough time to exploit some real flaws of Apple's new water cooler hit but make no mistake that I do believe that this is the best Mac ever. Now, let's see if you need it.

The Macbook Pro Retina (MBPr) is a powerful machine loaded with the best combination of power and mobility. The base 2.3 ghz Ivy Bridge CPU is a beast capable of netting a Geekbench 64-bit score of 12,061 in my test and for some perspective there is not a desktop iMac on the list that scores higher. The Kepler nVidia GT 650m is clocked higher and has more memory than the new non-retina models that help it display that 5 megapixel or 2880 x 1900 screen. It's also capable of driving 4 external monitors via 2 thunderbolt, 1 hdmi (a first for Apple) and it's own. Newer games can run at the full resolution though expect frame rates to hover around 20fps at medium settings. I've loaded up Modern Warfare and Borderlands and this machine barely breaks a sweat at my old Macbook Pro's resolution of 1440 x 900. It uses ram that's twice as fast as previous models and the Samsung SSD (with probably to best/most stable controller for a Macbook) is also twice as fast as the Toshiba SSD Apple installed on my last Macbook Pro. The bottom line is this one of the most powerful computers period, consumer desktops included.

Do you need that power? To be honest, up until I started editing video in Final Cut, my last Macbook Pro was more computer than I needed. Any Macbook with a Core Series Intel chip and 4gb of ram will easily handle word processing, Photoshop, Aperture, and 1080p streaming. If the Macbook has a solid state drive like my old MBP then the system as a whole will feel lightening quick and iPad like with instant wake from sleep and a sub 18 second boot time. My move was going to be, and the one I would recommend if you have a similar workload, getting a Core Series Macbook Air.

Do you need to render HD videos longer that 5 minutes or pixel rich RAW images? When I began doing just that my 2010 Core i7 Macbook Pro would take nearly an hour to export a 10 minute video clip and the machine got hot as it was also pushing a 27 inch Cinema Display. It lagged even more if I wanted to stream Netflix while I waited for the video to finish. My machine was a first generation i7 with a dual core chip. All Macbook Airs at this point have dual core cpus, so expect similar export times and the eventual need for a Pro model. You can also eliminate the 13 inch version of the Macbook Pro as that's a dual core as well. Ultimately, if you edit videos you're looking at the 15 inch Macbook Pro that sport quad-core cpus.

Did you know that the Macbook Pro Retina is the cheapest 15 inch Macbook Pro you can buy new? Let's give this a walk through with the base models. SSD's are the future of all computer storage so now or later you'll have one. Besides that it's the single greatest upgrade you can do for your computer. Plus 4gb ram is pushing it and becomes a bottle neck if you edit videos and large file photos. So a conservative 256gb SSD and 8gb ram upgrade from Apple will cost you $450 added to the $1799 base price, which come standard on the base model Retina version. So for $2399 you get a machine that's slower (MBPr nVidia GPU is clocked 275 ghz higher with 512 mb more memory) and doesn't have the Retina Display. Suddenly, that $2199 price tag for the Macbook Pro Retina looks more than reasonable, it looks good. Now you do lose the superdrive, gigabit ethernet, firewire 800 and future expandability/repairability (iFixit rates it 7/10 MBP and 1/10 MBPr, higher the better) but you do gain a sleeker design that runs significantly cooler. You can also buy an external super drive for $79 and a thunderbolt-to-ethernet adapter for $29, still putting you below a similar specced non-Retina MBP.

Sandy Bridge, Ivy Bridge, Haswell, Broadwell, and beyond. Sandy was a tick. a huge step forward for mobile computing basically doubling what was capable before as the first quad-core CPU to fit inside a Mac 15 inches or larger. Ivy is a tock, which takes Sandy and gives it a die shrink making it more power efficient. Intel has mapped out this tick tock sequence well into the future so we know a few things. We know the ticks are the major updates, the one that changes the game. We know Haswell is the next tick. We know Apple and Steve Jobs had been pushing Intel to get Intel into mobile GPUs, even threatening to run it's own ARM processor at the Macbook Level. The Ivy Bridge CPU and it's integrated GPU are still joined as two separate islands on one board. Haswell looks to have significantly increase internal graphics performance while residing on the same "island" as the CPU. This leaves extra space for a larger battery. Speaking of, battery life is the significant leap that makes Haswell the next "tick." We're talking 24 hour battery life, 10 days connected standby time, and general iPad-like charging is an after thought. Intel's recent demo showed the Haswell chip running of the illumination from a single light bulb. It dispenses more power than what's needed for it to run. If you have anything prior to Sandy Bridge, then upgrade away, this Ivy Bridge Macbook Pro Retina is going to be an unbelievably powerful machine to you. If you do have a Sandy Bridge then you might as well wait for the next release as they get more powerful, run for much longer without a charge and run without all the quirks of this year's model.

The Retina display is the much ballyhooed feature of the this "next generation" Macbook. Why does Apple give it this nick name? Why aren't they available across the board of Macbook Products? Well, Apple new it was going to be costly and they knew the IPS panels themselves are hard to make. It's also the major culprit of performance issues. There are numerous reports of consumers seeing image ghosting where the residual outline of say Safari will remain on the screen upwards of 5 minutes. My personal performance experience was more pleasant with my older Macbook for everything but Video encoding. The current hardware is supremely powerful by today's standards but those bars didn't factor in driving a 2880 x 1800 display. This results in laggy web browsing as it has to load and then redraw pages. You get barely playable frame rates at full resolution with games like Diablo 3 and you want to because 2880 x 1800 is just stunning. There just aren't enough things that take advantage of it as Developers are making a miserable turn scrambling to find scaling algorithms that make sense when factoring in a Retina Display. Apple's own iWork Suite lacks Retina support and looks fugly upon close inspection. Scrolling and zooming on a web page now becomes CPU intensive and results in a less than smooth experience. I've also seen the spinning beach ball more times in the past week than I did in the year and a half I owned my last Macbook. Final Cut Pro X crashed twice on me. The screen is also dim. I used to be able to work with brightness set to half and now I have no choice but to go full brightness during the day on my MBPr. So though the Ivy Bridge CPU is more power efficient than last years model, the fact that more of it, along with the the GPU, is being stressed to push a display that needs to be set at full brightness results in 5 hour battery life under a diet of youtube, word processing and light photo editing. You can get over 7 hours in a non-retina version and the Macbook Airs. Mountain Lion will address many of these issues on the software side utilizing more of the GPU and Haswell should clear up any hardware throttles, so it seems Apple had a purpose in designating it the "next generation" Macbook as it's not really ready to exist now.

So it's the best Mac ever made? It is. The design, while subtle, harbors enough changes that makes working with it for a full day a significantly better experience than the old model. It's thinner yes, but it feel more solid, with the old one's feeling like I had lots of empty space between my hands. The screen is gorgeous with apps that utilize it. It's a glimpse at resolution independence. If everything was displayed at the full 2880 x 1800 icons would look tiny and text would be illegible. So everything looks like the standard 1400 x 900 setup but all the extra pixels are used to give insanely crisp images. I almost don't want to use my Cinema Display because it's just not as good. The real key is when an app like Final Cut Pro X gives you a user interface that gives you the standard layout in super sharp fashion and then processes the video footage as separate entity. Let me explain, in a standard Final Cut Pro X UI the video window is down-scaled to fit the pixels in that window. In the MBPr, there's no need to down-scale, that little window can display a full 1080p resolution. The same goes for Aperture which is Retina ready. So instead of the entire app rescaling images to make them fit the available pixel space, a Retina Display can scale the UI elements to make them fit while other parts can be viewed without altering. In practice, it means I spend less time time going into full screen mode to see how a shot or a photo looks and more time editing scenes. Workflow is greatly reduced as I weed out good photos from bad ones because the thumbnails pack so much detail.

It is the little things that count. Things like the asymmetrically spaced fan blades that I can report indeed have a quieter effect, if they even get a chance to spin. The MBPr definitely runs cooler. Exporting a 1080p video yielded 100 degree celsius temperatures on the old model and I clocked the Retina version at 49 degrees rendering the same clip. The glare on the screen is reduced but the gloss still give colors that "pop." The speakers sound fuller and slightly louder than before. HDMI was a surprise feature but the two USB 3.0 ports were sorely needed and appreciated. The SDXC card slot is reliable now and fuss-free, not the case in older ones. Importing 40 photos literally took half a second. At first glance, it doesn't look all that much different but its after daily use that you truly start to appreciate its svelte physique. The amount of thought put into this machine is obviously high and the more I use it, the more grateful I am of it.

You should consider buying:
-video editing more than 5 minute clips
-photo editing large RAW files
-increase productivity via screen real estate otions

You should consider waiting for Haswell version:
-have a Sandy bridge version
-want the 13 inch version of a quad core chip

You should consider the new Macbook Air:
-if you don't fit any of the above

I bought mine here and didn't have to pay tax. Saved me $219 which I used to buy a $187 2tb external USB 3.0 drive here.Western Digital My Passport 2 TB USB 3.0 Portable Hard Drive -WDBY8L0020BBKNESN (Black)
Comment Comments (5) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 15, 2012 9:34 AM PDT


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