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NETGEAR Nighthawk X6 AC3200 Tri-Band Wi-Fi Router (R8000)
NETGEAR Nighthawk X6 AC3200 Tri-Band Wi-Fi Router (R8000)
Price: $289.99
23 used & new from $259.99

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Used as Access Point. Impressive Speed. Flexible Set Up Options., January 18, 2015
PLEASE NOTE THIS REVIEW IS FOCUSED ON BEING ABLE TO USE THE NETGEAR NIGHTHAWK X6 AC3200 R8000 AS AN ACCESS POINT THAN A REGULAR ROUTER.

PROS

1. Super fast, powerful and stable.
2. Three separate wireless network bands for better speed management to separate legacy wireless devices (B and G) away from the most common N devices to the latest AC equipment.
3. Automatic setup via Netgear's Genie user interface that detects existing network settings.
4. Fanless operation with generous airflow opening for better heat dissipation.
5. Dual 1GHz processing.
6. Six configurable external antennas for better placement.
7. Beam forming for stronger wireless signal direction.
8. Access Point ability via the WAN port, preserving the 4 LAN ports for your wired equipment.
9. Available USB 3.0 and USB 2.0 ports for hard drives and wireless printing.
10. iTunes and DLNA music server capability.

CONS

1. Massive and awkward size. Almost twice as big as my previous AC1900 router.
2. Irreplaceable antenna.
3. Super bright LED lights that can only be turned on or off instead of an adjustable brightness.
4. Lacking eSATA port.
5. Lacking Wireless Bridge capability (which I don't recommend, but may come in handy for others).

BREAKDOWN

I am impressed with the performance of this router. I was coming from a dual band D-Link DIR-880L AC1900 that was fast as well especially for the price, but I need a router at this day and age with lots of flexibility including being able to set it up as an Access Point (AP).

I understand manufacturers are trying to "dumb down" the settings and make it more user friendly especially interface-wise. And that's fine with me. But what I don't find appealing is when they also don't give you the flexibility by hiding the advanced configuration with no access at all. This Netgear Nighthawk X6 AC3200 router gives you the middle ground. It doesn't give too much, but it doesn't give too little.

I have 20 wired and wireless devices connected to this router from a basic wireless printer, to various home automated devices that manages the lights and door lock, to a gigabit switch with load balancing to two NAS. In between are your usual smartphones, tablets and computers. Thus my need for more network speed that helps each device communicate at it's optimum without slowing down the others.

Enter the Netgear Nighthawk X6 AC3200 (R8000) Tri-Band router. Okay if you want to go technical there are only two unique bands - a 2.4GHz and a 5GHz. The third is not an entirely new bandwidth, but another 5GHz network transmission. So what you actually have are three separate networks operating independently and all communicating back to the router.

The benefit of which is segregating devices according to their speed into three groups. The first group is the 2.4GHz where your legacy B, G, and even N devices will reside. The second group is for your 5GHz N and AC speeds capable of 5GHz transmission. The third group is a repeat of N and AC 5GHz transmission. So ideally the first 5GHz network is for the N devices and the second 5GHz network is for AC devices. If you don't have AC devices, yet, then you can configure the router to load balance the two 5GHz networks. That way it will assign each device into either so that the faster N devices are in one group and the slower N devices in the second group. In order to achieve this you will have to assign both 5GHz networks the same name and then click on the "Smart Connect" option. In this case you don't have to overthink where you want to connect each device unless you have specific needs and you know each capability.

ACCESS POINT

All routers can be configured into an Access Point even if the router doesn't explicitly have a setting for it. Of course you'll need to know your cable modem IP address and subnet. You will also need the DNS of your internet provider. They usually have two addresses. I had to do this static routing option with my prior router, D-Link DIR-880L, because it didn't have any explicit setting to operate as an Access Point. That router only allows to function as a Router or a Wireless Bridge (which means it picks up the existing wireless signal and re-transmits it).

In my case, I have an internet provider that supplies a cable modem with built in router and wireless transmission. I turned off the wireless transmission, but left the routing function because my home is wired with LAN ports and I made this cable modem do the routing for the home. But for the wireless aspect and other devices, I am letting this Netgear Nighthawk X6 do it's job. And do it's job it does excellently.

Unlike other routers where you manually configure as an Access Point, but need to use a LAN port and not the sole WAN port, this Netgear allows you to use as an Access Point without losing a LAN port. That also means by utilizing the WAN port then it is able to detect when you are connected to the internet. When I used my old D-Link DIR-880L as an Access Point, I can definitely go on the internet but it doesn't know I'm connected to the internet. The interface annoyingly tells me that I am not connected and advices me to repair when there is nothing to repair.

SETUP

With this router all I need to do is plug the ethernet wire to the WAN port, power up the router and either connect to an available LAN or join the factory Wi-Fi. Launch the browser and let the Netgear Genie take over to detect your internet connection and settings. If you want to manually configure it yourself, you can do so yourself.

I tried the Genie and it was able to detect that I have an existing router in the network. So it asked if I wanted to set it as an Access Point which I did. Then it asked if I wanted it to get the IP address setting dynamically from existing router OR enable fixed IP settings on this device which means I manually input the settings which surprisingly it does not recommend. I understand the recommendation if you don't have advanced network experience. Otherwise if you have specific needs then manual input is the way to go.

From there it detected the network settings and applied to the router. It will tell you to allow a few minutes before it restarts. In my case I waited a long time and it looked like it already hung. After 10 minutes, I powered down the router and powered up expecting I would repeat the process. It actually applied the settings and came back online as an Access Point.

After which I fine tuned some settings to my liking under the Advanced options. The router like any router will default to Basic settings. But for advanced users there is always an Advanced menu.

ISSUES

If I have an issue with the router, it's the shape and size. It's so wide it's 3/4 the size of a PS4 but does much less.

Moreover although I like the placement and partial flexibility of the six external antennas, these aren't replaceable should you accidentally break any of them. So be careful.

There are 13 bright led lights (power, internet, 2.4Ghz band indication, 5Ghz band 1 indication, 5GHz band 2 indication, LAN 1, LAN 2, LAN 3, LAN 4, USB 2.0, USB 3.0, WI-FI ON, WPS) which you can shut off or leave steady on than blinking during data activity. I would prefer them on but it would be better if you can adjust the brightness.

OVERALL

I highly recommend this router. At the top end of the router devices, there are two competing standards right now which is this so-called AC3200 that offers three separate network bands to ideally split the B and G, N, and AC devices so that they don't intermingle and effectively slow down the other. This router is SU-MIMO (Single User Multiple Input and Output). The other standard is the AC2300/2350 MU-MIMO (Multi User Multiple Input and Output). Theoretically the MU-MIMO is faster on paper because it allows up to three simultaneous users at the same time rather than all current routers actually taking turns sending and receiving data (you just don't notice this because each one takes turns in split seconds). The problem with MU-MIMO is that as attractive as it is on paper, you cannot harness the speed unless the client side (meaning your devices) is also equipped with MU-MIMO capability. And since I don't have any device that can harness this capability, the Netgear Nighthawk X6 AC3200 is the most practical and obvious choice by providing blazing fast speed with your existing gear all by offering three separate bands like a three-lane highway to allow segregation of different speeds.

Of course until the 8 antenna AC5300 Ultra Wi-Fi routers come into market later this year, this is one of the fastest available and most capable router for people with more than a dozen wireless and wired connections in their homes.


Belkin WeMo NetCam HD+ Wi-Fi Camera with Night Vision, All Glass Wide Angle Lens, and Infrared Cut-off Filter
Belkin WeMo NetCam HD+ Wi-Fi Camera with Night Vision, All Glass Wide Angle Lens, and Infrared Cut-off Filter
Price: $129.99
20 used & new from $90.00

3.0 out of 5 stars Not the greatest, but the best option for those into the Wemo Ecosystem, January 2, 2015
UPDATE: JANUARY 16, 2015

For some odd reason this camera conflicts with the AirPlay protocol forcing the devices to reset and lose connection with the router. I thought it was my router, an Apple Airport Extreme Dual-N. So I switched to a D-Link DIR-880L AC1900 router. Still doing the same. Whenever the camera is on and connected, the AirPlay devices are kicked out every now and then.

I again switched to the Netgear Nighthawk X6 R8000 AC3200 thinking this will surely solve the issue. Not at all. Still reset and loses connection from the router as a result. So today I searched for anyone else having the issue and apparently it is a known one for similar AirPlay users.

It happened to the Wemo Insight as well and AirPlay but stopped with a firmware update. Now they are doing it again with the Belkin Wemo NetCam HD+. I am hoping Belkin with these reviews are addressing the problem. Once this is solved, I will update my review once again.

So I am downgrading my review to 3 stars until it is fixed. Otherwise, will have to return the camera and find another one that doesn't cause issues.

Belkin Netcam HD+ F5Z0559

The Belkin Netcam HD+ model (take note of the "+" designation which is different from the Belkin HD camera) video quality is the best I've seen so far for a consumer level camera at this price. It has HD capture and transmission and equipped with glass lens for better picture quality. Those familiar with the Wemo setup will find comfort in the simplicity of this as well. You power on the Netcam, download the specific Netcam app. Connect your smartphone or tablet to the camera by specifically connecting to the wireless transmission as if you were connecting to your router. Once connected, you then launch the Netcam app and the final setup process will comment from there in which you can rename the camera (if you have multiple cameras connected around the house) as well as change settings.

There is a two-way push to talk feature via the app. To hear audio feed, you will have to always turn it on each and every time you launch the app. There should be an app setting to know if you want default on or off. While to talk, you push the button while talking and then release. Just like a walkie talkie.

Depending on your internet speed and the Belkin/Seedonk server, I have a 3 second lag with video and audio feedback.

You will need to sign up for a Belkin Netcam account in order to securely log on to the app or their Belkin Netcam website through the browser in order to view the live camera feed.

Please ensure to update to the latest firmware once set up is complete to ensure optimal performance before putting it to it's paces. The app itself will inform you of the update.

However for better features including cloud storage, you will need to sign up for a monthly ($9.99) or yearly ($99) to harness it's full capability. Unfortunately Belkin has made sure they don't provide you with SD card storage capability so you can do that yourself.

But do take note that you can manually take photos and videos via the app to save on your smartphone. There are individual buttons to do that. That just means you will have to monitor 24x7 yourself and unless there isn't an area of real concern to do such then you're just driving yourself to paranoia. Which is where the convenience of monthly cloud storage fee kicks in.

FINAL THOUGHTS

I can't give this 5 stars. The lacking feature for the Belkin HD+ camera compared to other lower priced competitor cloud cameras are as follows:

- Lacking Pan and Tilt function. It has a wide angle lens, but a pan/tilt ability will make this camera with HD transmission a winner.
- Lacking On and Off remote switch in itself so you can turn it on and off within the Wemo app. I had to pair it with a Wemo Switch to be able to turn it on and off remotely.
- Lack of SD card slot for your own storage capability rather than be forced to sign up with their cloud service.
- They should incorporate this webcam straight into the Wemo app without having to launch another Netcam app the way it is doing now. Similar to the Wemo Insight that has added monitoring features but already built into the Wemo app itself. This way you have one solid Wemo ecosystem.

Also Belkin did not actively market in the packaging nor on the instructions that they have a remote viewing via a web browser the way competitor cloud cameras are highlighting. I can only surmise they have been pressured into building a Netcam viewing platform over the web which I have accidentally found so they can compete with the other consumer cloud cameras that offer no fee viewing. I can log on with the sign up details I set up through the Netcam app, but unfortunately it looks like a beta stage at this point and again as of this writing because it cannot work with the latest Flash plug in which if you are technologically savvy (the fact that you buy into these products) your software are all updated by now.

Until all these have been addressed, I am putting my hopes up for this Belkin platform that they are able to offer updates sooner than later they way they have addressed their Wemo products.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 2, 2015 9:10 PM PST


Belkin F5Z0559 Netcam HD+ & Wemo Insight Switch Bundle
Belkin F5Z0559 Netcam HD+ & Wemo Insight Switch Bundle
Offered by Bifoli Home
Price: $159.99
12 used & new from $155.88

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good combo package for your Wemo Ecosystem, December 28, 2014
I'm liking this value combo pack from Belkin. I was pleased that the included Belkin F5Z0559 Netcam HD+ camera is incorporated into the Wemo ecosystem. Clicking into the Wemo app launches the specific Belkin Netcam app (once you have downloaded it to your smartphone) in order to view as a cloud camera.

Individually priced as of this writing the camera is purported to retail at $129.99 and the Belkin Wemo Insight at $59.99. So as a package you are saving quite a lot (theoretically). However if you do search from retailers online you can find a deal as well. If you need both, then this is a no brainer package to purchase.

It is also worth noting that Belkin is offering a cheaper Belkin HD+ camera and Wemo Switch combo package, but if you can find this more expensive combo package on sale then might as well get the one with the Wemo Insight.

I was able to get this even cheaper on sale at a wholesale store and that's a great deal in itself.

Belkin Netcam HD+ F5Z0559

As for the Belkin Netcam HD+ model (take note of the "+" designation which is different from the Belkin HD camera), the video quality is the best I've seen so far for a consumer level camera at this price. It has HD capture and transmission and equipped with glass lens for better picture quality. Those familiar with the Wemo setup will find comfort in the simplicity of this as well. You power on the Netcam, download the specific Netcam app. Connect your smartphone or tablet to the camera by specifically connecting to the wireless transmission as if you were connecting to your router. Once connected, you then launch the Netcam app and the final setup process will comment from there in which you can rename the camera (if you have multiple cameras connected around the house) as well as change settings.

There is a two-way push to talk feature via the app. To hear audio feed, you will have to always turn it on each and every time you launch the app. There should be an app setting to know if you want default on or off. While to talk, you push the button while talking and then release. Just like a walkie talkie.

Depending on your internet speed and the Belkin/Seedonk server, I have a 3 second lag with video and audio feedback.

You will need to sign up for a Belkin Netcam account in order to securely log on to the app or their Belkin Netcam website through the browser in order to view the live camera feed.

Please ensure to update to the latest firmware once set up is complete to ensure optimal performance before putting it to it's paces. The app itself will inform you of the update.

However for better features including cloud storage, you will need to sign up for a monthly ($9.99) or yearly ($100.00) to harness it's full capability. Unfortunately Belkin has made sure they don't provide you with SD card storage capability so you can do that yourself.

But do take note that you can manually take photos and videos via the app to save on your smartphone. There are individual buttons to do that. That just means you will have to monitor 24x7 yourself and unless there isn't an area of real concern to do such then you're just driving yourself to paranoia. Which is where the convenience of monthly cloud storage fee kicks in.

Wemo Insight

Playing into the original Wemo remote switches, this has been in the market for quite some time and has their share of bugs over the few short years I've owned a Wemo. This specific model does the same remote switching of the outlet through the specific Wemo app no matter where you are in the world. The only addition to this model is it gives you an "insight" as to the power draw of the component plugged into the Wemo Insight. You will be able to view your consumption through the Wemo app.

I chose this Belkin model because I have over two years built a home around the Wemo ecosystem from their first offering and then clunky Wemo Switch and Wemo Motion. To their Wemo Light Switch. All of which have gone through numerous firmware updates as well Wemo app updates. Early users like myself were frustrated then, but I'm happy to report the Wemo products and app has become more stable and responsive of late thanks to their updates.

I don't really need the Wemo Insight specifically as I'm not obsessed to know what my power consumption is for a specific appliance. But what I do need and what I (sadly) use the Wemo Insight for is just as a remote on/off switch for the included Belkin HD+ camera - because the oversight of this camera is not having a remote switch in itself. So strangely enough it fits into the Belkin Wemo ecosystem, but is not able to power on or off itself remotely. So what I do is just plug the Wemo Insight to the outlet then plug the Belkin HD+ into the Wemo Insight. That way when I am home and I don't need to monitor myself, I turn the camera off. When I am away from home and need to monitor my kids and the Nanny caring for my kids, I simply remotely power on the Wemo Insight. After a minute, the camera powers itself on and appears operable through both the Wemo app and Netcam app.

FINAL THOUGHTS

No matter how good of a package this Belkin is at it's price especially when on sale at the Wholesale store, I can't give this 5 stars. The lacking feature for the Belkin HD+ camera compared to other lower priced competitor cloud cameras is as follows:

- Lacking Pan and Tilt function. It has a wide angle lens, but a pan/tilt ability will make this camera with HD transmission a winner.
- Lacking On and Off switch in itself
- Lack of SD card slot for your own storage capability rather than be forced to sign up with their cloud service
- They should incorporate this webcam straight into the Wemo app without having to launch another Netcam app the way it is doing now. Similar to the Wemo Insight that has added monitoring features but already built into the Wemo app itself. This way you have one solid Wemo ecosystem.

Also Belkin did not actively market in the packaging nor on the instructions that they have a remote viewing via a web browser the way competitor cloud cameras are highlighting. I can only surmise they have been pressured into building a Netcam viewing platform over the web which I have accidentally found so they can compete with the other consumer cloud cameras that offer no fee viewing. I can log on with the sign up details I set up through the Netcam app, but unfortunately it looks like a beta stage at this point and again as of this writing because it cannot work with the latest Flash plug in which if you are technologically savvy (the fact that you buy into these products) your software are all updated by now.

Until all these have been addressed, I am putting my hopes up for this Belkin platform that they are able to offer updates sooner than later they way they have addressed their Wemo products.


iDevices IGR0009 iGrill2 Bluetooth Thermometer
iDevices IGR0009 iGrill2 Bluetooth Thermometer
Offered by Bargainazon
Price: $175.00
4 used & new from $124.00

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The best option out there so far. Could have been constructed with a bit more heft., December 27, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
For the price of this Pro model, I honestly would have expected more build quality. When picking up the unit I didn't expect to feel so much plastic and fake chrome siding. Other than that, the display is pretty simple and straightforward.

- There is a power button.
- The temperature readout is shown.
-There are left and right arrows to basically scroll through the 1 to 4 probes you may have connected.

All of this is operated by 2 x AA batteries that are supplied by the manufacturer so you can get going right out of the box. Acclaimed battery life is a cool 200 hours which is more than enough if you plan on cooking by smoking.

Once powered up you can use it as is. But the shining moment of this unit and the reason you're paying for it is the advanced Bluetooth Smart 4.0 built in which you download the app to your iOS or Android smartphone and tablet. From there you can monitor the meat and cooking temperature up to 150 feet away. You set grilling temperatures and get alerts once this has been achieved or even an alarm when minimum and maximum temperatures have been achieved.

Out of the box, it comes with two pro grilling meat probes which is adequate for a household. If you have different levels of doneness then you simply remove and re-poke the probe to the next meat cooking longer. Otherwise this unit can take up to four probes which is essential if you really want to monitor each meat. The pro meat probes measures temperatures between -22°F and 572°F. This means it can measure ambient temperature especially if you like to smoke your meat.

However for more accurate ambient readings, iDevices is selling extra probes including a specialized pro ambient probe which comes with a rounded tip and a grate clip so you can position the probe right next to the meat without poking. To poke into the meat, you will want to simultaneously use the pro meat probe with the sharp ends. Cost is $25.00 per probe. Please don't buy from unauthorized sources as this company had old probes with voluntary recall due to melting of the silicone on the probes.

The iGrill 2 comes with a rubber mount that has a magnetic base so it can attach to your oven or griller. It can also be positioned 180 degrees facing up or down depending on your viewing and grilling position.

The probes are multicolored and the case they each come with actually snap together for easy organization.

The app itself is a little bit iffy in operation where my iPhone says it's connected to the iGrill 2, but the app itself states there is no unit connected. This was after pairing the two together. I connected the probes and it says no probes connected. While I downloaded it to my iPad and there was no issue connecting this time and reading the probes from any of the four terminals. By the way, make sure you download the correct app as the manufacturer has an iGrill app for older units. The correct app is the iDevices built for the iGrill 2.

My gripe in not giving this 5 stars is because for a "pro" device and for the price, they could have built the actual unit with a bit more heft and weight to it with heavy duty plastics and actual chrome metal rings.

Also it would have been nice to have an AC powered option for indoor use.

If they can update the iOS app to fix the bugs and stability issue then this latest iGrill2 can deserve a higher rating.

Other than that this is the device to get for the high tech grilling lifestyle these days.


Big Hero 6 11" Deluxe Flying Baymax with 4.5" Hiro Action Figures
Big Hero 6 11" Deluxe Flying Baymax with 4.5" Hiro Action Figures
Price: $30.49
144 used & new from $25.00

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Awesome Baymax. Half-hearted Hiro Figurine., November 23, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
If you want to impress your child or your friend's children, this is the gift to give this year. It's big. It's hefty. It's Baymax!

The plastic material is substantial. Baymax is heavy. If I were a child I would find this toy awesome.

For a big, clunky Baymax the posable ability of this toy was done well. The elbow is tight so it stay into any position. While the knees part clicks which helps when you want to make him stand on his own. Baymax has small feet so the weight of this toy helps him stand up just fine without being wobbly or clumsy to place into position.

A great plus is that this toy is electronic. He has an on/off position at the back and a subtle button by his chest. Like any decent toy manufacturer, batteries are included. Pressing on the button makes his helmet part light up and he makes robotic sounds. When you attach Hiro to his back, pressing on the button again will make him begin to talk. With Hiro still attached to his back, if you put Baymax into flying position he will make various flying sounds (similar to the flying Grover doll).

There are two more buttons. One button at his back will make him spread his gigantic wings. The other button by his left arm will enable Baymax to shoot his hand. Because of the weight of the hand alone, it really won't go far out. But it's a good addition to the toy.

So why only four stars? Well my issue is with the Hiro figurine. They planned it out well with Baymax, but it seems they half-heartedly included Hiro in this set just for the sake of it.

For one he isn't posable at all. He's in an awkward position ready to be strapped in the back. You can't really play with him alone and move his arms, legs, and head just like a regular figurine.

Second, attaching him to Baymax isn't strong and can be disappointing at times. He easily falls down so playing with him attached to Baymax isn't too exciting. Yes he has magnets on his hands to activate Baymax and attach to the back. But they should have gave the figurine stronger magnets on the hands and knees so it can attach just by magnet. You don't need to align it exactly and the plastic pegs that he has right now doesn't loosen up.

So I am knocking down one star because of this mis-step in construction. Otherwise, it could have been a perfectly awesome toy to play with for the child or the child in you.


Star Wars Command Star Destroyer Set
Star Wars Command Star Destroyer Set
Price: $33.49
54 used & new from $27.46

3.0 out of 5 stars Nothing great. Space ship is okay. Non-posable figures. Batteries needed and advertised but none are included., November 23, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
This is a Star Wars Command Star Destroyer set comes with the following:

1. Star Destroyer space ship
2. Remote Control
3. Four (4) pcs plastic missile ball
4. One (1) Metallic-painted Darth Vader
5. One (1) Gold-painted Luke Skywalker
6. Three (3) Storm Troopers
7. Three (3) Rebel Soldiers

The only assembly required is for the Star Destroyer space ship which is an easy snap on. After which there are a few creative ways to play with this Star Wars Command set even without the required batteries.

Your child can simply play with the plastic figurines alone. They are molded plastic that aren't posable. These are similar to the classic green Toy Soldiers Army Men. Nothing exciting here, but plain old imagination.

One can play with the Star Destroy space ship without batteries. To be able to fully use as intended, then you are required 4 x AA batteries for the space ship and 2 x AA batteries for the controller. None are supplied. Despite that they recommend Duracell which is a turn off in marketing. If they recommend a certain type of battery, please supply it as well.

To operate the remote, there are hand movements to learn. One to make it go forward, another for reverse, and then finally to shoot the green transparent plastic balls.

What your child does is set up the figures and he puts them into line of sight for the spaceship to fire upon.

The quality of the pieces are what's expected from a known manufacturer like Hasbro.

The gameplay is another matter. Without posable figures, it gets boring. The construction of the space ship is fine, but the construction of the figures is plain lazy. Yes, you get Luke Skywalker and Darth Vader that have metallic painting that grown ups will appreciate to collect. For the actual child they could care less.

For that reason and for the lack in supplied batteries doesn't make this too attractive to purchase for it's given price. It's an okay toy to probably give without having to think further. But for my son, he just moved on after less than an hour of play.

Your milage of course will vary.


Bose 722713-0010 WB-120 Wall-Mount Kit
Bose 722713-0010 WB-120 Wall-Mount Kit
Price: $24.95
7 used & new from $24.95

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Simple and Effective Two-Piece Metal Bracket Tailor-made for the Bose CineMate 120, October 26, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This WB-120 Wall-Mount Kit is specially made for the Bose CineMate 120 Home Theater System. This simple two piece metal bracket understandably is not included because not everyone has decided to wall mount their TV and hence their sound bar.

One metal piece goes into the soundbar via the included screws. The other metal piece goes on the wall also via included drywall mount screws. However if you really want a solid setup on your drywall, I would suggest using a better quality drywall hardware package to ensure your drywall screws doesn't get loose and fall out over time.

Once connected to each piece - the wall and the soundbar - all you need to do is hang the soundbar metal over the metal connected to the wall. There is a rubber piece you stick to the metal so the soundbar plastic doesn't get damaged from the metal or vibrate annoyingly if you put it to the test.

So why only four stars? Everything is included including the annoying template all manufacturers fall into. They supply you with the convenient paper template for you to cut out. Unless you have an awesome paper cutter or a robot hand, you will never be able to cut the template straight.

When manufacturers supply you with a wall mounting template, I demand these to be pre-cut already and actually printed on a hard cardboard sheet. Not on a paper for you to manhandle and attempt to cut straight.

Like all paper templates, I skip using these and actually use the actual speaker measurements and screw height measurements. I then use the wall markers and finally a leveler to ensure proper vertical and horizontal installation.

With the quality that Bose is injecting into their image, I wish they can improve their template and actually give owners who are demanding a Bose hassle-free installation the same ease in wall mounting their products.


Bose CineMate 120 Home Theater System
Bose CineMate 120 Home Theater System
Price: $1,099.00
16 used & new from $999.95

12 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Price to Pay for a Simple and Worry-Free Set-Up, October 26, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
SETUP:

Bose has carefully and thoughtfully packaged the CineMate 120 so each content can be pulled out in an orderly way from one box with the console, the other box with the accessories - remote, speaker cables, power cables, and HDMI cable. Then the next layer is the carefully packaged soundbar. The bottom layer is the acoustimass module.

As you unpack, I would suggest setting up each to your location of choice as your remove the plastic wrapping. That way you can just route and connect the speaker and power cable wiring to each component.

POWER UP:

Once the cabling is done and the placement of your components are all set, it's time to power up the console and the acoustimass module. The sound bar is powered by the main console on behalf of the proprietary Bose speaker wiring that connects to it. While the acoustimass module has it's own power source and communicates via wireless. Although placement of the bass module can be anywhere within 30 feet of the console, I would suggest placing it as close to the sound bar as possible so there is no disconnect with the perception. I will touch on this more later.

ADAPTIQ:

Adaptiq is Bose's own term for their audio calibration process. This is your first order of business to ensure optimum speaker performance based on your room size, wall, furniture and drapery placement. You just plug in the minijack to the side of the console and wear the Adaptiq headset.

It essentially takes five measurements based on where the five people in your household will be sitting.

This process is similar to my existing THX home receiver that does auto calibration for best audio performance. Both shoot out high and low pitch tones to measure the speaker output and your room environment. The only difference is that Bose forces you to take five measurements than is necessary. Unlike my home theater set up by the living room. This Bose CineMate 120 I have placed in the bedroom. So I really have an audience of 2 most of the time with maximum of 4, if ever. I think the least Bose can do is give you an option to add more or do less measurements than force you to find five positions. Because mine is in the bedroom, how many listening positions do I really want on my bed. I can think of more than five positions in the bed, but not with the Adaptiq. Thank you.

So once the five measurements are done, it's time to start connecting your sources if you have not done so already.

CONNECTIONS and ARC (Audio Return Channel):

My Bose console is mainly connected to my 2012 Samsung LED TV. It's worth noting that if you have sources directly connected to your TV instead of the Bose console, then you should select the HDMI port on your TV with the ARC (Audio Return Channel) capability. This means that any source that plays on your TV will route it's audio to the Bose via the same HDMI cable that you connected from the Bose console to the TV. This is unlike the old days where you needed to feed a separate audio cable from the TV to your receiver in order to hear audio that the TV is playing. If you don't have media sources connected to your TV directly then this is not a concern. Or rather the work-around is to connect them to the Bose console than the TV.

The problem for me is that because the Bose console is too limited in function other than being an audio playback device for four HDMI sources, I have to play my other digital sources stored in a USB stick and hard drive via USB connection to the 2012 TV that can handle playing these various media. That way the TV plays the media then feeds the audio back to Bose.

HDMI-CEC / ARC issues:

That's not to say the ARC feature isn't perfect and I don't know who's fault it is at this point - Bose or Samsung. For one there is a set up in Bose's console that times out the console if no audio is playing for some time, with ARC via Samsung it plays the audio then eventually shuts off the audio. This means I'm listening to the Bose audio at one point then when the console shuts off automatically because it thinks there is no audio (oddly enough) then the audio goes back to the Samsung TV. The workaround for me is to disable the auto shutoff on the Bose console and it will play the ARC audio from the Samsung TV just fine for hours.

The second issue for me is that there is an annoying Samsung display stating their ARC (or what they also bill the feature under their Anynet+ branding) is routing to the Bose CineMate. Sometimes it will appear for a few seconds then disappear completely. But other times it will flicker on and off continuously. It's very annoying. So clearly Samsung and Bose are not 100% compatible with their HDMI-CEC (Anynet+) with regards to properly detecting and passing the ARC audio. But with regards to basic functions such as turning on and off the console, the TV power will also turn on and off just fine.

BOSE Remote control:

Kudos to the Bose remote control. I like how it's made. The size is big, but it appears to be the one simple remote I can live with to replace my TV and Arris cable box remote. Of course with the button naming and placement, there is a learning curve but after an hour of playing with the Bose remote to control my cable box I believe I have it all figured out.

The HDMI-CEC did not work for me. I had to program the remote for my cable box as well as the Samsung TV in order to have proper commands directly seen by each devices. Which is not a big deal once programmed. The Bose manual will explain how to program and the included program booklet codes is easy to find based on the most common devices out there.

If all else fails then you'll need to program your remote the old fashioned way by learning each commands. This will take time and patience. If this were the case, I would just use multiple remote controls than program each button and then learn the use of each buttons.

CONSOLE:

I find the Bose console too basic in function. It's small like a basic DVR. It can take four HDMI sources with video and audio as well as well three additional audio only sources via the optical audio (Toslink), coaxial digital audio, and analog RCA audio. There is a fourth bonus analog audio input via the Adaptiq on the side. It can be programmed as an Aux audio in or even a headphone out jack. For this feature, I'm impressed Bose has thought of it to program this way than an exclusive Adaptiq jack that will theoretically be only used once.

My gripe with the console is that there is no on-screen display that feeds to your TV. I was disappointed and surprised at this day and age Bose with it's price range has not built this feature. Instead I have to look at their tiny console screen to go through the menu and setup. Honestly for over a grand in purchase of even the basic CineMate 120, I can only scratch my head at this omission.

And more omissions which is true to Bose, they don't really discuss or even reveal their specifications. Such that this console actually only acts like an HDMI pass through. There is no upscaling of your sources unlike my THX receiver of the same price range. Anything I feed into my home theater receiver, it looks awesome because it tries to output like it's a 4K source. The good news is Bose is able to display 4K resolution if your HDMI source is 4K as well. But the bottomline is that it will display whatever your source is the same way it's being fed into the console.

But what if I have THX sources. As an audio and video enthusiast I do have THX media. Or DTS. Or Dolby Digital. So far I have seen that Bose will detect Dolby encoded media and actually display this to their mini display on the console for a few seconds or when you adjust the volume. Other than that, there is no way of knowing what Bose is receiving or actually doing to it.

Which means I don't like the lack of transparency of the console. I don't know what's happening, how Bose is processing it and spewing it out. I know Bose simply wants you to forget about those things and just listen to the output. If you like what you're hearing then that's what all you should be concerned about.

I have to note that Bose was criticized for this awhile back. They don't publish their specifications. Again as an audio enthusiast that cares about audio, I want to know what is the dynamic range of the Bose console and speakers? What is it really capable of? How low can the Acoustimass module go? It seems Bose wants you to forget about these technicalities. This marketing will work with people with money and no concern for anything else. If it works and seems to sound beautiful then that is all that matters. For other people like myself who are much deeper into the audio and video world, we also want more information.

SOUNDBAR:

Bigger is better, of course but the Bose CineMate 120 is perfect for my application. I have been wanting to buy a sound bar for my Samsung TV but everything is too long and too big. I never knew this CineMate 120 existed until it was offered to me. Actually I was not looking into Bose at all for the same reasons I said above.

But 17" in length x 3.1" in height of a sound bar is perfect for my bedroom application. My 55" Samsung LED TV is big enough hung on my wall, I don't need another equally big sound bar the size of my TV to show how big the picture and sound should be in my normal downtown sized bedroom. This Bose sound bar as soon as it was set up is more than loud enough to wake up the neighbors and shake their walls.

I had to separately invest in the Bose WB-120 Wall-Mount Kit (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00O66Q2LA/ref=cm_cr_ryp_prd_ttl_sol_1). It costs a quarter of a Benjamin and they supply the special metal brackets. I understand why Bose does not supply it, not many people are wall mounting their TV or speakers. It's a simple bracket and did the job just fine.

AUDIO QUALITY:

Despite Bose criticisms from audiophiles, Bose does even say in print when I opened the package that they don't colour the sound with exaggerated highs and lows unlike other speaker systems that make you believe they sound good because of this added equalization.

I raised my eyebrows then I played my audio sources. You know what, it sounds really nice. The Bose sound quality that they were known for is very evident. The mid-range is at the front and center and very clear with no audible distortion despite cranking up the volume. And at normal listening levels, dialogue was crystal clear coming from the compact sound bar. Very impressed.

My previous experience with personal audio setups with studio monitor speakers and separate subwoofers now carried over to my living room, I did find shortcomings in the lower range of the audio spectrum with the sound bar and Acoustimass bass module crossover. I find that, as with all Bose crossover and their tiny speakers, the crossover is too high. Because there are no specs, it's at least at 110Hz or even higher versus the conventional 80Hz for true non-directional bass support.

Because of this high crossover point, the Acoustimass module cannot really be placed anywhere despite being wireless because it tends to be directional than non-directional. So even low talking voices are split into the main sound bar and the Acoustimass module which means if they are far apart you hear the audio from two far apart sources. So to truly have a fuller effect in audio range, I would suggest to place this bass module closer to the sound bar than farther away. This will make the audio blend into one seamless dynamic range.

As for the highs, there are no surprisingly annoying high notes that jump out. And that's a good thing. Bose seems to actually play the sources you feed according to how it demands to be sounded. Of course you have to bear in mind this is taking into account their proprietary processing based on their compact speaker sizes and how it affects your actual room and furniture placement.

MISSES:
For a system that costs over a grand, it's got to be a joke not to have wireless connectivity options already built in. Bluetooth audio has to be the standard at this point for pricey systems. In order to get wireless streaming, you will need to buy an accessory for the console. If this was a couple of hundred, it's probably understandable. But not at this price range.

FINAL THOUGHTS:

Just to let you guys know I did patronize Bose in their early years in the professional music DJ scene with their Bose 901 as well as their outdoor speaker application Bose 101. Then they became well known to the masses with the release of their Bose Acoustimass series speakers. By then Bose marketing was everywhere. You sit down and pretend you were listening to big speakers until the final reveal where they show you tiny speakers all around and a small bass module that drives the whole audio. My parents bought one for their home theater (and still works to this day). Then the independent testing came out. I grew up and delved further into the audio and video production where critical listening mattered. I needed to know my specs and suddenly Bose to me didn't exist.

But because of this experience and for applications such as bedroom where I don't need critical listening or critical setup of speakers, but where I definitely don't want to rely on the measly flatscreen flat-sounding speakers. This Bose CineMate is a force to be reckoned with in these applications. I will choose this Bose for it's small size and powerful output over the sound bar of the other guys. At least with Bose I get an elegant looking and well constructed speaker system. It's not tacky or cheap especially when hung to the wall next to your big TV.

If I were to do it all over again, I would probably still choose Bose for my bedroom and all other rooms that needed a sound bar set up with less complications than a 5.1 wiring and still output a rich sound especially for movies. The expensive price of any Bose is another factor, of course. But the seeming simplicity of their product versus the audio quality that you can get from their small speakers IS their selling point. Not to mention the build quality. You aren't getting a cheap looking product mind you. Everything is built solid.

The only issue is that the missing built-in wireless connectivity at this day and age for a system costing over a grand is an unacceptable commission. Do manufacturers really have to nickel and dime the features by selling more accessories that will occupy another space on your set up as well as your power supply receptacle? It seems only Bose has thought this was a simple decision for a company that touts simplicity in their products.

This will not replace your elaborate home theater speaker set up that demands critical listening and a variety of audio sources and proper certifications. This will however play along just fine with the big boys that don't care about those things as well. For a sound bar set up, Bose is definitely up there.
Comment Comments (5) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 15, 2015 8:49 PM PST


Yamaha HS5 Powered Studio Monitor
Yamaha HS5 Powered Studio Monitor
Price: $199.99
37 used & new from $155.00

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Legacy Continuous, October 13, 2014
I am impressed with these small Yamaha HS5 studio monitor speakers. For my home theater set up by the living room, I went through a few speaker sets including the first version Mackie MR5 (impressive performance for the price), then the KRK RP6G2 (good design more than sound), then back to the Mackie MR5G3 (great sound, bad design). My go to speaker for the living room became the KRK because I got one of their limited edition colour scheme and with a 6.5" woofer, produced a more robust sound. Then one day one of the KRK speakers just died. There was power, but there was no sound output. I checked it in the authorized KRK repair shop in my area and they quoted me a repair cost equivalent to the same price of a brand new speaker.

Since I had a previous generation speaker, I set out to find a new pair of studio monitors. Then I came across these HS5 which is the latest version to Yamaha's infamous HS50.

DESIGN
Unlike KRK and Mackie of trying to one up each other in speaker design that it's getting ridiculous and tacky altogether, Yamaha has gone the traditional route of offering a boxy speaker that look like your typical bookshelf. What sets this apart is their iconic white woofer cone set against black speaker cabinet. This is further highlighted by the white illuminated Yamaha logo when powered on.

In one of my old reviews I did give bad marks on the latest speaker design of the Mackie MR5G3. While it's true speakers are meant to be listened to and not looked at, as a reviewer I beg to differ. You review everything from it's design and build quality down to it's audio output quality. Plus if you buy studio monitor speakers for it's flat response to showcase in your home the way I do, then yes design does matter especially when price among other studio monitors are comparable.

Like all studio monitors, this is an open design. There is no protective grill to cover the actual speakers. Except for the massive 1" tweeter which has a metal grill.

SOUND QUALITY
I hesitated to jump on the Yamaha HS50 speaker because of it's reputation among audio mixers. I was looking for a decent sounding speaker that could try to achieve a flat response considering the price point. I wasn't after a $1K a pair studio monitor as I wasn't doing critical listening. I just wanted less coloration for my home theater.

When the HS5 came out last year, the positive reviews started pouring in. Yamaha was able to tame the sound quality and provide a more pronounced mid-range which is perfect for overall listening.

I find these speakers offer a clearer sound quality than my Mackie or KRK of similar price range. The vocal frequency range is crystal and the highs is balanced.

Of course for a 5" woofer, there practically is not much bass. It's a good thing if you want to monitor how your audio will sound in everyday speakers. For extended bass, I added a subwoofer at 80Hz cut off.

OVERALL
I would highly recommend these speakers if you're looking for relatively affordable studio monitors for everyday listening. For a 5" woofer, yes these are more expensive to the comparable sized KRK RP5G3 and Mackie MR5 III but the better sound quality makes it worth the added cost.

You get what you pay for. No gimmick in speaker design. Just straight up honest sound quality which I can't complain for it's price range.


D-Link Wireless AC1900 Dual Band WiFi Gigabit Router (DIR-880L)
D-Link Wireless AC1900 Dual Band WiFi Gigabit Router (DIR-880L)
Offered by Super Duper Deals
Price: $162.67
49 used & new from $155.30

4.0 out of 5 stars Very Decent, VeryFast AC1900 Wireless Gigabit Router, October 4, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
THIS REVIEW IS FOR THE D-Link Wireless AC1900 (DIR-880L)

UPDATE: JANUARY 17, 2015

I have now moved on away from this router. It's too basic for my specific needs and although the router is powerful and will serve a majority of home users, the capability for advanced settings and control is not made available.

I have an existing cable modem + router that I can set as a cable modem only and shut off the "routing" function. However because my home is also hard wired with ethernet sockets all around, the routing function is useful to distribute wired ethernet around the house. But the wireless function of the cable modem + router is outdated and should even have existed. Enter the need for more advanced wireless routing solutions.

I needed an advanced router that will take all my 20 wired and wireless devices into a mixed environment from b/g, n, and ac connection standards. But I also need this to act as an Access Point. Yes, you can configure this router as an AP but by doing so you will lose one LAN port and the router will tell you, you are not connected to the internet simply because there is nothing connected to the WAN port.

I was hoping D-Link would update their firmware to allow explicitly being an AP by using the WAN port and by still being user friendly without further advanced tinkering. Unfortunately I could not wait any longer. So I moved on and found the Netgear Nighthawk X6 R8000 that fit my needs. It allows being an Access Point by connecting your existing router into it's WAN port. It also auto detects and configures based on your existing router settings. No tinkering needed.

When D-Link updates their firmware to allow being an Access Point as well, I may bring this back to life from storage so I can connect more wired devices into it.

It's great for people seeking basic plug and play fast connections without any real technical needs. If this is you, it's one of the routers to consider.

UPDATE: JANUARY 06, 2015

Last late November 2014 there was a firmware update for the router bringing it to 1.02 and lists as follows:

-----

Problems Resolved:
1. Sync to D-Link SVN server with GUI
2. Update DHCP reservation's behavior

Enhancements:
1. Update FCC band 1 output power
2. Update mydlink agent

-----

It honestly doesn't mean much to me as I use the router as an Access Point (AP) with my internet server's cable modem as the main router. However the update does allow more stability in playing nice being used as an AP. Prior to the firmware update, this router would not allow static routing and having the same DHCP IP Address range as your main chosen router. With the update, it picks up the DHCP IP Address Range of the main router so now it can actually function as a true Access Point.

I do still have one more thing to contend with this router and it's because as an Access Point I have to plug the main router ethernet to the LAN port versus the WAN port, as is the case with all routers being used as an AP.

The difference is that with my old Apple Extreme router, I simply set it as a wired Bridge with static routing then it's able to detect and report having an internet connection with the main router. With the D-Link DIR-880L router as AP, it does play nice but it reports on the GUI screen and external light on the router itself that there is no internet connection and it needs to be repaired. Despite those warning, I do have internet connection. The Apple router is able to detect such, there should be no issues this 2014 router can do the same.

Now at 2015 this router is not the top of the line in the consumer range. So at this point people may be buying it as an Access Point or Bridge as well and have an AC3200 act as the main router. If D-Link can listen and update their firmware to allow to have not only a Bridging option, but an Access Point option so that by doing so you can plug the main router cable to the WAN port and have 4 free LAN ports that need it. This will also allow the router to detect that there is in fact a live internet connection and will report as such.

In any case I did call D-Link technical support which "routed" me to another country. I asked to clarify what the "coexistence" setting is which has been added in the new firmware, but he didn't have updated documents on his side and said it does not exist and to have me re-check what I saw. I am shaking my head with disappointment.

Next I asked if he can provide "technical support" on how to set this up as an Access Point. He said there is no function to set it as such. Again this is incorrect because I have done it. All routers are access points and it's just a matter of setting a static IP address. If Apple can make this happen, I'm surprised D-Link cannot provide support on it with their technical support team.

Lastly the version 1.0 manual talks about the Bridge mode which lets you know that if your internet provider gave a cable modem / router unit then the Bridge mode for this router will come in handy. This is only partly true. Setting it to Bridge mode will kill the WAN port and will force you to connect the D-Link router to your main router via wireless only. Unlike Apple routers, you cannot "bridge" via wired connection. So again I urge D-Link to update their firmware and correct the Bridge mode or add an Access Point mode so that you can truly connect this router with your existing cable modem / router unit via wired ethernet through the WAN port.

When this does occur one day, I will post an update.

ORIGINAL REVIEW FOLLOWS BELOW:

I was surprised how slow my Apple router was until I replaced it with this D-Link Wireless AC1900 (DIR-880L) router. I didn't realize how much the router was holding up on the data transfer as I thought it was my internet provider. Swapped it for this D-Link and suddenly my computer's browser sprang to life. So if you have a dated router like I do and with limited budget, now's the time and you could be their target market.

Set Up:
- Super quick and easy I didn't need the actual manual to get started. You unpack the router to find the base unit and three antennas that you screw into place at the rear. You plug the ethernet cable (provided) from your internet provider's modem port to the rear port of this router that's labeled "INTERNET" which is also color coded yellow.
- Plug the power adopter and apply power to the router.
- If you are trying to connect wirelessly for the first time to the router then there is a small business card with the default router name and password. Follow that to connect either to the 2.4GHz or 5GHz bandwidth. If you are connecting via wired ethernet cable, then take any of the four gigabit ports to connect directly to your computer.
- From there you simply launch your web browser and go to [...]. The set up Wizard will take over where you can finish the setup depending on the type of modem you have as well as change the broadcast name and password to your own liking.
- Let the router re-start to save your settings and you sign back on with the new broadcast name and password. Once connected back in, you are now up and running.
- For more advanced users, there are more settings that enable you to control the flow of data in a very easy to understand graphic interface.

PROS:
- Easy set up it's scary how powerful this router is, yet how intuitive it is to turn you into an advance user.
- Dual core processing power that enables you to interact with this wireless router with less lag than previous router.
- Fast data speeds. It's not the fastest, but it's up there in the top considering the prices of other wireless routers it's competing with.
- Smartbeam technology which allows the router to concentrate on the wireless area depending on the demand of the devices in range.
- Able to host and stream practically any recognizable file these days - video, audio, photo, etc.
- USB port for printer and hard drives
- GUI with drag and drop ability for smoothest set up.
- Wall-mountable with the included hardware.

CONS:
- Despite being the most current model of D-Link it's still not the fastest among the other AC1900 players. However, the price of this unit makes up for the lack in speed. For regular users who are upgrading, this is plenty fast enough. For advanced users who need the most control, this may not be their cup of tea.
- Odd shape. I've been used to the boxy wireless router. This one has an awkward shape with lots of edges only PC people will appreciate. I don't mind the three protruding antennas, but the footprint of this router demands more space. While the thought of hanging this doesn't really warrant being displayed, but more of hidden.
- Typical plastic construction that demands to be tossed once outdated.
- Very limited Bridge mode and Access Point mode. I'm glad this has a bridge mod, but it's it's too limited in feature. While it has also been pointed out to me that any router can technically act as an Access Point which after researching online is true. The problem with this router is that it is trying to analyze your input in the settings and is telling you otherwise that there is an error, etc. While trying to do Access Point manually, this router will point out that you are not connected to the internet and is suggesting to repair the settings. It will even tell you that you have no clients connected to the router. But that is not true. In my case, after manually inputting the settings to act as an Access Point all my 9 devices were able to connect wired and wirelessly to this router. They all access the internet as well as communicate with each other with the 10th device on the main router supplied by my cable provider. Despite this successful connection, I am warned I have no internet and the internet light by the front panel is not lit up. This router wants to be a smart router, but ends up being annoying.

My out-dated Apple router acts as a Bridge and Access Point altogether. All I need to set is for it to be a Bridge. Then I state whether the connection is wired or wirelessly. From there is determines whether it becomes an Access Point with Bridging capability. This is what I expected from this 2014 router that boasts of it's Wizard capability.

As such I am disappointed that although it has Bridge mode and everyone can manually set it as an Access Point, it cannot act as an Access Point with Bridge in the first place. If you choose Bridge, you are forced to connect wirelessly than wired which then slows you networking capability right there. Instead, you are forced to bridge from a wireless signal. If I want to improve my wireless connection I want to take the best possible source which is via the gigabit wired port. The last thing I want is to take an already degraded or reduced wireless connection and feed it into the router especially if the wireless signal is 2.4GHz rather than the latest 5GHz to begin with. This was a major disappointment for a 2014 router.

OVERALL:
If I was starting from scratch, I wouldn't hesitate choosing this router. It's fast and it has a powerful wireless signal. For those like me who want to expand their existing connection, it's not advantageous to choose this model.

I hope D-Link is able to upgrade the firmware to allow seamless Access Point with Bridging capability via wired ethernet cable right from the Wizard setting just like my 2010 Apple router so I can truly use this as a replacement.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 9, 2014 11:57 AM PDT


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