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David Pearlman "sound fanatic" RSS Feed (Arlington, MA)
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Ipevo CDCU-04IP VX-1 Internet Conference Station for Conference Calls and Remote Meeting
Ipevo CDCU-04IP VX-1 Internet Conference Station for Conference Calls and Remote Meeting
Price: $219.00
3 used & new from $219.00

5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic conference station at a relative bargain price given the quality...Something of a Polycom killer for home use, September 27, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Anyone who does a lot of teleconferencing is familiar with the expensive conferencing devices that you find at work. Mostly, you find the "mushroom" type Polycom branded devices, which run $400 and up. They are very good. And very expensive.

I do a lot of teleconferencing from home, and my company has not seen fit to give me a Polycom station. So I've had to make do either with high end headphones with a good attached microphone (not bad, but the cable annoys me and I hate looking like a doofus on video conferencing calls), or else use the speakerphone capability of my home phone (mediocre at best) or the built in microphone in my computers (junk at best). So I was interestd to get this device...Despite the considerably lower price, I was hoping I'd have something to match the quality of the Polycom.

Much to the surprise of my inner skeptic, this Ipevo conference station has turned out to be great. When I use it, I sound as clear as I do on those much more expensive Polycom devices. I can move around the room and it picks up my voice just fine. And the reproduction of sounds coming FROM the Ipevo is also excellent. This is one of those times when I finally got something that I told myself a hundred times "I'm not going to waste the money on that" and now I wonder why I didn't get one a long time ago. It makes conferencing from home MUCH more pleasing. Not just for me, either. For everyone who has to listen to me. (The downside: They still have to listen to ME. This device can't fix that!)

As to the ergonomics: You can choose one of our directional microphones, or you can choose an omnidirectional mode. Since I use this at home, I always use the omnidirectional model. But it's worth pointing out that you can ONLY choose EITHER one of the four directional microphones OR the omnidirectional mode. You can't pick, say, microphones 1 and 3. I can't recall that being an issue even at work with multiple people in the room, but it's worth pointing out.

Installing the conference station on your PC is trivial: Basically, connect the included USB cable from the device to a USB port on your computer. Installation will occur automatically. Then (if necessary) point the audio out and microphone in selectors to the new device.

The Ipevo can also be attached to either a PC or a phone via an (included) headphone jack cable. HOWEVER, the device must be powered by the USB connection. Note that the device can ONLY be powered by a USB connection. To provide the needed power, you can either connect this to a USB jack on your computer, or else to a USB power adapter you plug into the wall (NOT included). A standard USB adapter with at least 500mA output (basically any USB adapter you can buy today) will be sufficient to power the Ipevo. The key point here, though, is that you can't use it with your phone UNLESS you also have access to a USB power source. This limits, to some degree, the convenience of using it only with your phone. For example, to use it in your car (if you were so inclined), you'd need a USB lighter-adapter and you'd need to plug it into that for power. If you want to use it in a room without a PC, you'll need to plug it into the USB adapter in the wall. It would have been nice if a rechargeable battery were included that would obviate the need to be near a power source. But in my day to day use, I find this only a very modest drawback.

On the whole, I am extremely pleased with the Ipevo, which seems to provide quality commensurate with the Polycom devices costing more than twice as much, and is quite easy to use. Highly recommended for the home warriors among us :-)


TP-LINK TL-PB10400 10400mAh Dual-Port Ultra External Battery Portable USB Charger Power Bank, Fast Charging, High Capacity, Compatible with iOS and Android Devices, One Micro USB Cable, Practical Flashlight
TP-LINK TL-PB10400 10400mAh Dual-Port Ultra External Battery Portable USB Charger Power Bank, Fast Charging, High Capacity, Compatible with iOS and Android Devices, One Micro USB Cable, Practical Flashlight
Offered by Network Giant
Price: $49.99
23 used & new from $45.96

4.0 out of 5 stars Good emergency USB power source that delivers what it promises in a good ergonomic package, September 27, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I now have several devices that, like this charger, provide the ability to recharge your USB devices on the go. They all work pretty similarly: You charge the device (which itself is 95% battery, and 5% casing and USB ports, plus in some cases like this one a modest flashlight), then you stuff it in your computer bag/purse/luggage and pull it out in situations where you need to charge your portable USB device and don't have a standard power outlet handy.

All these devices have the same caveats: A) Once charged they will all loser power over time, even sitting on the shelf; B) It is best not to leave them to fully discharge. Full discharge without any use from a fully charged state will take months. However, if you use it, and forget to recharge it when you get home, and you put it on the shelf for a few months, you may well find your device in a state of deep discharge and it might stop working properly (or else not work as well once recharged); C) You will not be able to get the full rated mAh power out of the device...Assume, at best, maybe 70-80% of that number. The rest goes to the overhead of transferring the power to your device; D) Modern smartphones usually charge well on a 1A outlet (so either of the connectors here will work), while larger devices, such as tablets, typically require around 2A charge (at least to charge and run at the same time). Fortunately, one of the outlets here supplies a 2A charge.

OK, now for some reality checks. Typical modern smartphones have batteries that range in capacity from roughly 2000-3500 mAh (2000-2500 is more common). This device offers about 10000 mAh total capacity, but remember that inefficiency issue mentioned earlier. So that means that the real amount of recharge capacity this charger can provide, when full, is closer to around 8000 mAh. So that's good for 2-3 charges, depending on the size of the battery in your smart phone.

If you're thinking of recharging your tablet from empty, you're risking using the entirety of the charging capability of this device for one charge. For example, an iPad 4 has a ~11000 mAh battery, and the iPad Air has a ~8000 mAh battery. However, in reality, how often might you need to recharge your tablet from empty to full on the road without access to a power outlet?

In terms of ergonomics, this power adapter is somewhat differently shaped than most. Typically, these adapters have been flat, relatively thin, and relatively large--reflecting the batteries inside (often re-purposed from standard laptop designs). This charger is more rectangular...Think: a short square sausage, 3.5" long. I actually prefer this shape, although your mileage may vary. The dimensions of this charger also make it easier to carry as a flashlight (it has a built in light) if you want to use it for that. I did a cursory test of the light and found it to be adequate, but not really appreciably better than the flashlight mode on my smartphone and assuredly not as good as a good dedicated flashlight. Still, it's fine for emergency applications--and if you keep it in your glove compartment, it might find some use in that capacity.

In terms of charging the device itself: This is done from a USB charger source via a standard micro USB cable. The micro USB cable is included BUT THE CHARGING SOURCE IS NOT. Be clear on that: You need to provide your own charging source. You can use your standard smartphone charger, or any other standard USB charging device. Just note that this device has a lot of capacity and it will take some time to charge. A 2A charger will require 7 hours to fully charge this device from empty. A 1A charger will require about 10 hours to fully charge this device. And if you choose to use the USB connection to your computer (and you can do that), which provides only 0.5A (by design), it will take roughly 25 hours (!!!) to fully charge this device from empty. Obviously, a more powerful charger is desirable. (Most chargers supplied with recent smartphones are 1.5-2A chargers). And if you're leaving for a trip, you may want to remember to charge this device the day BEFORE you need to leave!

In my own tests on a standard modern smartphone (Moto X, ~2200 mAh battery), I found that I got 3 full charges from this device, and there was some power left, but not enough to charge a forth time to full. That's not bad at all. I was also able to take the phone from empty, put it on this charger for a few minutes, and then use the phone in high intensity applications (GPS + surfing) and the charger was able to keep up with the drain on the phone.

On the whole, I'm quite happy with this charger and would recommend it based on the ergonomics and the tested ability to the expected amount of charge based on the specs.


Plain Spoken
Plain Spoken
Price: $11.88
43 used & new from $8.96

18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is arguably John Mellencamp's best album since his '80s heyday, September 23, 2014
This review is from: Plain Spoken (Audio CD)
This is arguably John Mellencamp's best album since his '80s heyday. It's basically an extension of the back porch folkiness of a song like Jackie Brown, or a song like Human Wheels with the drums and guitars turned down. You sense his heart is in this work. He's written one of his best batches of songs in a very long time. And, unlike a few of his recent albums, this one successfully cuts the difference between a certain simple audio verite and just enough adornment to best bring the songs to life. (To elaborate on that last point: His last few albums have all been in a more mature style, but in my opinion, they've been a bit studied and claustrophobic in their approach. This album is freed from any particular audio concept and is the better for it. I also think the songs here are, on the whole, stronger.)

Ultimately, there's a lot of simplicity here: John, mostly acoustic instruments, and few production tricks. You could imagine that John could sound exactly like this if he were playing on your back porch with a few of his friends. Plain Spoken is an apt title. (The one exception is the last track, Lawless Times, a bluesy toss off).

If, like a lot of people, you were a big fan of Mellencamp but lost interest when John seemed to lose focus, this might be the right moment, the right album, to get back on the bus. He's older, he's quieter, and he sings with a bit more gravel, but so, presumably, do those things apply to all of us.

This is Mellencamp more mature, but no less impressive than the Kid who kicked it up about Little Pink Houses way back when. He doesn't really rock here, but he's present and engaged and engaging. And that rocks a lot more.

Highly recommended.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 24, 2014 2:07 PM PDT


Collector's Edition
Collector's Edition
16 used & new from $2.91

3.0 out of 5 stars Great collection of songs, docked two stars for needlessly spreading 2CDs work of songs over 3CDs, September 16, 2014
This review is from: Collector's Edition (Audio CD)
This is a budget priced 3CD collection licensed by EMI (John Lennon's label) to Medacy, for sale at certain retailers, particularly FYE.

These licensed collections tend to be all over the place in terms of material. Some are junk, some are pretty good. This one, in terms of the tracks presented, is REALLY good. They hit most of the obvious and best bases here. There are 30 tracks, and almost all of them, aside from a couple of second string covers from his oldies album (Peggy Sue, Angel Baby) and an unnecessary and sloppy Beatles cover (Come Together), would probably make the cut for most people. So that's about 27 out of the 30 songs. As I said, this is mostly killer, little filler. And the sound quality is good, as you'd expect from a late era license product.

So why only three stars? Because these 30 tracks would fit, EASILY, on 2 CDs. They're distributed over three so this could be sold at a certain price point and still appear a per/CD bargain. But it's annoying to have to change the CD every 10 songs. Still, if you are going to rip these to your hard drive, that's not a big deal. And if you're not...well, then it's annoying...

After all the compilations, including some that attempt to paint various pictures of John's solo career, this one one (aside from the 3 CD issue) may well be the best of all in terms of including the most great songs without including too many second stringers.


Radio City
Radio City
Price: $9.79
30 used & new from $5.45

3.0 out of 5 stars Pointless decoupling of the 2-fer SACD/hybrid disc from 2004., September 15, 2014
This review is from: Radio City (Audio CD)
This is a great album. 4-5 stars for the music. But you already knew that (or can find countless essays detailing the praise).

But this reissue gets only 3 stars. Why? Because, despite hype to the contrary, this is just a pointless decoupling of the 2-fer SACD/hybrid disc from 2004 #1 Record/Radio City. That 2004 2-fer offers the same sound as this one on the CD layer, and higher resolution sound on the SACD layer. And you get both albums on one disc for considerably less than buying them separately. And if you want one, you do want both albums.

Be careful. There are many reissues of the 2-fer:

1) Import on Line label from Germany
2) Import on Big Beat label (some variants missing 2 songs)
3) 1992 2-fer on Stax/Fantasy
4) 2004 2-fer SACD #1 Record/Radio City
5) 2009 2-fer on Stax/Concord.

The one you want to get is #4, the SACD. Avoid the 1992 and 2009 reissues, which have inferior sound.

One additional comment: This music was recorded with a lot of treble and not a huge amount of bass. That's how it sounds on the original vinyl, and that's apparently how it sounds on the master tapes. None of the reissues is an audiophile delight. But of the reissues, the SACD 2-fer is the one to get.


#1 Record
#1 Record
Price: $7.00
29 used & new from $5.89

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Pointless decoupling of the 2-fer SACD/hybrid disc from 2004., September 15, 2014
This review is from: #1 Record (Audio CD)
This is a great album. Five stars for the music. But you already knew that (or can find countless essays detailing the praise).

But this reissue gets only 3 stars. Why? Because, despite hype to the contrary, this is just a pointless decoupling of the 2-fer SACD/hybrid disc from 2004 #1 Record/Radio City. That 2004 2-fer offers the same sound as this one on the CD layer, and higher resolution sound on the SACD layer. And you get both albums on one disc for considerably less than buying them separately. And if you want one, you do want both albums.

Be careful. There are many reissues of the 2-fer:

1) Import on Line label from Germany
2) Import on Big Beat label (some variants missing 2 songs)
3) 1992 2-fer on Stax/Fantasy
4) 2004 2-fer SACD #1 Record/Radio City
5) 2009 2-fer on Stax/Concord.

The one you want to get is #4, the SACD. Avoid the 1992 and 2009 reissues, which have inferior sound.

One additional comment: This music was recorded with a lot of treble and not a huge amount of bass. That's how it sounds on the original vinyl, and that's apparently how it sounds on the master tapes. None of the reissues is an audiophile delight. But of the reissues, the SACD 2-fer is the one to get.


Dell XPS 12-5328CRBFB 12.5-Inch Convertible 2 in 1 Touchscreen Ultrabook
Dell XPS 12-5328CRBFB 12.5-Inch Convertible 2 in 1 Touchscreen Ultrabook
Price: $597.44
14 used & new from $524.99

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Best of the first generation convertable Windows 8 laptop tablets. Excellent except for mediocre battery life, September 8, 2014
The review below is for this tablet, which represents the first generation version of the Dell XPS (with the I5-3337u processor; the so-called "Ivy Bridge" generation processor). As such, it gets acceptable but not stellar battery life (realistically around 5 hours). There is an updated version of the XPS 12 (e.g. Dell XPS 12.5-Inch 2 in 1 Convertible Touchscreen Ultrabook (XPSU12-8670CRBFB)) which uses the next generation processor and offers about 8 hours battery life, plus some other, more minor, improvements. It's your call whether you can live with that tradeoff when buying this version--which at the time of this review is significantly cheaper.

This is one of a new breed of convertible laptops created to take advantage of the Windows 8 paradigm, which allows use as both as tablet and a laptop. While this category is expected to grow, right now, there are essentially only a modest number of entrants, and only two that could be reasonably be called innovative: The Dell XPS 12 (this one), and the Lenovo Yoga 13. The Dell and Lenovo sport similar power specs (cpu, memory, hard drive, battery life), but the Dell has a much higher resolution, better, screen. In my opinion, the Dell takes that competition handily.

Focusing on the XPS 12, this is a terrific piece of hardware, with a lot of pros, and only a few significant cons.

Summarizing,

Pros:

Beautiful super high resolution 1920x1080 12.5" screen
Very high build quality
Terrific innovative screen that rotates in the frame to go from laptop/keyboard to tablet configuration
Very responsive with even the base configuration of an Intel I5 processor and 4Gb memory
Incredibly fast boot time (10-15 seconds)
Very good keyboard
Responsive touchscreen which operates in both laptop and tablet modes
Fast SSD drive in all configurations
Decent webcam (1.3mp)
Light, portable charging cable.
Bluetooth, Wireless N (5 + 2.4Ghz)
Backlit keys on keyboard

Eh:

Battery life is 5-5.5 hours.
Weight is 3.5 pounds, which isn't heavy, but isn't super light for a 12.5" laptop. A bit heavy feeling in tablet mode
Speakers are predictably mediocre for a small laptop
Base configuration has only a 128Gb SSD hard drive. However, the hard drive IS user replaceable.

Cons:

No HDMI or VGA port. Only a graphics mini displayport, which means you will need to carry a mini displayport -> HDMI or VGA adapter if you want to use this for business or with a TV/external monitor.
Memory is soldiered to motherboard and is not upgradeable. Fortunately, even the base configuration 4Gb of memory is more than sufficient.
Only two USB ports (both USB 3.0, however)
Battery is not easily user swapped/replacable
No built in media card reader. If you want to the SD card from your camera, you'll need to carry an external reader.
No GPS

Of the cons, the worst, in my opinion, is the fact that the battery is not easily swapped/replaced. While the 5-5.5 hour run time is pretty respectable, one can expect battery life to diminish over time, and I am not looking forward to dealing with that eventuality. Also, I like to carry a spare battery to swap out for long trips. That's not possible here.

Having struggled with various underpowered Android based tablets, including the Asus TF301/keyboard dock, I can say that using the XPS 12 in tablet mode is like a huge weight has been lifted. The XPS 12 screams when surfing the web, which is something I can't say about any Android (or Mac) tablet I've used--and I've used a lot of them.

People have complained about the lack of apps in the Windows 8 app store--and it's true that the Windows 8 app store is pretty anemic compared to Andoid or Mac. But some of the most important apps are there (Skype, Netflix, etc.) and it's still growing. There are enough to make using the tablet mode acceptable now...and the responsiveness provided by the Intel I5 processor makes it a pleasure to use.

There are a few configuration options available for the XPS 12, all related to the processor (a few speeds of I5 and I7), memory (4Gb or 8Gb) and hard drive size (128Gb or 256Gb). My recommendation: Any of the available processor speeds will be more than acceptable and the difference between the I5 and I7 processors for almost any user will be negligible. Similarly, most users will not need the 8Gb of memory. Windows 8 runs perfectly fine on 4Gb of memory. Unless you plan on running memory hog processes (advanced video editing, certain scientific apps, etc.) you won't need the extra memory. If you do need the extra memory, however, you need to order the laptop with 8Gb installed from the factory, as the memory is not user-upgradeable (it's soldiered to the motherboard...grrr...) A larger hard drive than the 128Gb SSD that comes installed on the base model is definitely a nice feature. But the hard drive IS user replaceable, and the incremental cost of getting the 256Gb mSata SSD from Dell is more than it would be to buy that 256Gb mSata SSD on the aftermarket and clone your 128Gb drive onto it. (You will also wind up with a spare 128Gb drive that way). Unless you are scared of the idea of hard drive cloning/migration, I'd recommend that path. Please note that this laptop uses the mSata configuration hard drive, rather than a full sized SSD to save space. mSata drives tend to be a bit more expensive than standard SSD drives.

Overall, this is a terrific laptop, and buying the least expensive configuration version is, for most, the recommended route.

Update: Dell has now released a second generation version of the XPS 12 (Dell XPS 12 XPSU12-5327CRBFB 12.5-Inch Convertible 2-in-1 Touchscreen Ultrabook (Carbon Fiber)). It is almost identical to the one sold and reviewed here with one significant difference: The new version uses Intel's latest "Haswell" series processor. This results in a bump of the run time on a full charge from around 5+ hours to around 8+ hours. Almost all other specs, physical characteristics, and performance measurements remain the same. But you do get a major improvement in run time per charge. Whether this justifies the increased cost for you will depend on how you plan to use the laptop.


20 Greats From Golden Decade of Power Pop
20 Greats From Golden Decade of Power Pop
Offered by newbury_comics
Price: $11.99
16 used & new from $10.48

3.0 out of 5 stars Decent 1 CD overview of power pop, marred by a lame live Badfinger track, September 5, 2014
This is a decent overview of '70s power pop. I can't argue with nearly any of the selections here. Although this same earth was covered by Rhino's power pop series years ago, those CDs are out of print. So this will do nicely.

I'm docking this a full star, however, because of the inclusion of the lame live version of Badfinger's Baby Blue. Obviously, the compilers weren't able to license the original studio version from Apple. So they resorted to a really poor live version. Better to have left it off and included something else.


AmazonBasics 11.6-Inch Laptop and Tablet Bag
AmazonBasics 11.6-Inch Laptop and Tablet Bag
Price: $12.49

3.0 out of 5 stars Excellent ergonomics, excellent price. Questionable protection. Adequate construction., August 29, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
First off, at the price point of under thirteen dollars, the value proposition here can't be doubted. Take a look around at possible protection/carry solutions for your < 12" tablet/netbook/laptop and you'll find pretty much nothing else that can compete.

So this is assuredly a good deal.

But how good a deal? That is, how good is this bag?

In terms of ergonomics, I'd give it an A: it's JUST big enough to do the job, and not too big. It has three compartments inside--although they're separated by thin plastic dividers. Outside, you have two zippered pockets. The strap this comes with is good enough. The handle is fine.

Construction seems OK. The stitching appears a little "on the cheap" and I'm not entirely convinced that either a road warrior would want this for full-time travel or that a student would want this bag for day-in-day-out travel to-and-from class. But for the casual user, it seems fine.

Now the Achilles heel: Protection. The padding at the bottom of the bag which will keep your tablet/laptop safe in the case where you drop it seems pretty minimal. There is SOME protection, so this isn't worthless in that regard. But they could assuredly have included a bit more cushion at the bottom. I would NOT trust my tablet/laptop to survive a few foot fall in this bag, if you should be unlucky, drop the bag, and have the bag hit near the bottom (and Murphy's law asserts that if you drop the bag, it WILL hit near the bottom). I have more expensive, higher end, bags and they are definitely more satisfactory in this regard.

But, provided you don't actually drop the bag from several feet, this bag should be fine for everyday use.

On the whole, you're not going to find anything better at anywhere near the price. If you want a bag that can hold your tablet/laptop AND the standard accessories (including a power cord), and you want a deal on that bag, get this. Just be aware that your may be getting more bag for your money than you expected, but you're not getting a BMW/Rolex/YourFavoriteLuxuryBrandHere for a pauper's price.


Rachael Ray Cucina Hard-Anodized Nonstick 12-Piece Cookware Set, Gray with Pumpkin Orange Handles
Rachael Ray Cucina Hard-Anodized Nonstick 12-Piece Cookware Set, Gray with Pumpkin Orange Handles
Price: $179.95
4 used & new from $179.95

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Adequate starter set of cookware. Pretty accented handles. But relatively thin and inflated piece count., August 19, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
We all know that Rachael Ray doesn't own a cookware manufacturing company. She licenses her name out. So the obvious question is: Who makes this stuff, and is there any reason to expect it might be OK?

The answer: This set is manufactured by the Meyer corporation, one of the biggest cookware manufacturers in the world. They own and/or manufacture a variety of decent brands: Circulon, Anolon, and Farberware. They also manufacture the Paula Deen line, the relatively low end SilverStone line, and this, Rachael Ray. Circulon and Analon are good midline nonstick pans, and you'll find the Farberware name on some nice midline stainless steel.

Where does Rachael Ray fit in? Basically, it's somewhat lower end than either Circulon or Analon. And that assessment comes primarily from the weight of this cookware. This stuff is relatively light. Now, some will appreciate the thinner walls and smaller weight. But if you are a serious cook you know that lighter stuff tends to have more hot spots and doesn't cook as evenly. It also doesn't hold the heat as efficiently.

So this is NOT something you should buy if you're a serious cook, or you're looking to upgrade from a decent set of starter cookware.

The nonstick surfaces seem acceptable. I used the pans for a couple of weeks and haven't seen any of the kinds of flaking that you see almost immediately when you use very cheap cookware. Whether they'll last for the long haul I can't say. But my guess would be, given the price point, that they'll eventually start to scratch and chip, the way that most low/midline cookware does.

The handles are cute: Stainless Steel with a silicone cover that is color coordinated. The color accents are a nice touch, but to be honest, the silicone is not thick enough to prevent the handles from getting very very hot with extended use. In other words, you will need your own gloves or mitts to use with these pots if you are heating long enough that the handles start to get hot.

In terms of value, I'd say you get about what you pay for--certainly this is not a "best buy". Oh, and the 12 piece set is really a 10 piece set. They've thrown in two extremely cheap (though color coordinated) utensils to up the count to 12. But cookware sets have traditionally been described by the number of pot/pan elements in the set--and most lines still do this. So when comparing price, consider this a 10 piece set.

On the whole, whether this set makes any sense for you will depend a lot on whether you're upgrading from low end junk and how much the coordinated color accents on the handles are worth to you. If you already have a decent set of cookware, I can't imagine replacing it with this. And if the color accents are not interesting to you, there are other sets of comparable or better quality that can be had (on sale) at a better price.


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