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Dingoo Digitial A320 Emulator Game Console MP3 MP4 Media Player LCD 2.8 inch with pouch & silicon case
Dingoo Digitial A320 Emulator Game Console MP3 MP4 Media Player LCD 2.8 inch with pouch & silicon case

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great as-is, Fantastic with Dingux, December 10, 2012
I have spent more time than I'd like to admit with this little thing. Note, I'm not wealthy by any means, but I do make an effort to have the current generation of gaming devices (360, Vita, you name it). This cheap little Chinese device has seen more play than the Vita, 3DS, and PS3 I own COMBINED.

I received this as a present when it was relatively fresh on the scene (the black version hadn't even been released yet). Out of the box, it was pretty impressive. Sure, the SNES emulation was a tad slow with that odd Y/X glitch and the Genesis emulation was laughable, but the rest was quite impressive. The unit itself has good-feeling buttons (most people seem to complain that the D-pad is too "squishy," but I don't really see a problem with it. It's responsive and works without giving me hand cramps). The speakers are quite tinny and could use a mod, of which I've seen a few. The one hardware complaint I really have lies in the shoulder buttons. They outright stink. They're just too tiny. I made my own little mod where I used some strong double-stick tape and fastened two plastic "wings" about an inch long and about 3/8 of an inch wide, and that greatly improved it. I'd give it a 3.5/5 rating at that point. With a firmware update and an improved Genesis emulator downloaded, it was brought up to about a 4/5.

Then I installed Dingux (Linux for Dingoo) and never looked back.

It really makes me wonder why these manufacturers even bother making their own OSes when Linux is free and has been around for ages, not to mention it has a large support base. Snes, Genesis, you name it, it ran smoothly. Overclocking wasn't difficult, especially considering the unit has a 400 MHz processor underclocked to 200 MHz. Technically, overclocking it (up to 400 MHz) isn't even overclocking it. It's reclocking it. It's even capable of some PS1 emulation (though not really what I'd call very "playable", although I did make it near the end of the first disc in FFVII). there was a port of Doom that ran quite smoothly, and using the HL Doom mod, I was even able to get some Half-Life on this. Wow. 5/5 for sure. Even with the minuscule shoulder buttons.

Considering that this is of of countless little gameulators from China, this is certainly a diamond in the rough. Forget the proprietary OS. Get Dingux. Or OpenDingux, which just came out a bit ago. You won't regret it.

Pros:
+ Wide array of systems capable of emulating (even more [and more smooth] with Dingux)
+ Largest support base of Chinese gameulators
+ Good build quality overall
+ Rather good screen
+ Good battery life (somewhere around or above 6 hours -- I don't even really notice it, so it has to be good)

Cons:
- Not as mass-produced anymore
- The price has gone UP. Should be going DOWN as technology improves. This isn't Apple.
- Needs a new OS to get the full effect
- Microscopic shoulder buttons
- Radio antenna is a little weak, but really, you probably won't even use it
- Mini SD instead of SD or micro SD. No one uses Mini SD anymore. Just use micro SD with an adapter.
- There are many different versions of the same unit, due to Chinese business practices, so with any of these, your mileage may vary.
- It doesn't make me toast in the morning

Conclusion: Definite buy, even up near $100. I've yet to see another Chinese gameulator come close to the quality of this baby, and only this and the original Dingoo A330 (same internals, larger RAM; not to be confused with the Gemei A330) can have Dingux.


iSymphony LED32IH50 32-Inch 720p 60Hz LED HDTV
iSymphony LED32IH50 32-Inch 720p 60Hz LED HDTV

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars So close, yet so, so far, December 8, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Like many others, I purchased this television as part of a Cyber Monday week lightning deal. I had actually had the TCL 32" LCD 720p LCD HDTV the same morning in my cart, but I hesitated too long and lost that deal. I now really wish I hadn't.

This TV had warning signs when I pulled it out of the box. For one, there is one label for the buttons on the TV itself, and this was peeling off. The holes were punched a little bit offset, and as a result, the sticker had to be folded to fit in place. The sticker with the serial and model number of the set was sloppily placed on the right side near the buttons, and it could be seen from the front of the screen. I figured that these were minor issues, and hoped that they were the only ones.

The build quality of the TV looks a bit cheap (surprise, surprise). The clear plastic lip on the bottom looks poorly molded and flimsy. The bezel has a few indentions and one little bump in the center of the top side. The remote's quality is so-so.

I hooked it up, and the screen itself looked surprisingly good compared to my other 32" LCD. I say surprisingly as this is an LED LCD, not a straight-up LED TV. Instead of CCFL backlights, it has LED lights, but other than the backlighting, it's a plain Jane LCD panel. I don't believe it's edge-lit, either. The images seemed to have fairly high contrast, but I think the response time is a little bit low. I played Dragon Age: Origins from my Xbox 360 on it and turning the camera showed a wee bit of blur. Not what you want to see in a new TV, especially when this one would see a lot of gaming. Aside from the WEEEEEE bit of blur, though, pictures came clear.

But the sound, OH THE SOUND. Words cannot BEGIN to describe how cruddy the sound is. No bass whatsoever, tinny, high-pitched, just... no.... What's worse is that unless you are plugging in passive speakers (i.e., headphones), the speakers will STAY ON. The only way around with powered speakers is to crank the external speakers' volume all the way up to the max and adjust the TV's volume accordingly. The sound from the TV's speakers should be so weak, that you MIGHT not hear it. MIGHT. I have considered voiding my whopping 2-year warranty by opening up the panel and removing the speakers or perhaps replacing them with something less horrible. Like a can of beans or something. That'd probably sound better.

For gaming, route your sound to a surround sound receiver. Trust me. You don't want any noise coming out of that TV.

The remote is okay, I suppose, but changing inputs is a big pain in the fanny. You have to 1) hit the input button, 2) select your input with channel up/down, and 3) hit select. On the remote, it's okay. But on the panel itself? There is no select button. You have to hit input, channel up/down, and then wait about ten seconds for it to select the input for itself.

There are very few features, which is to be expected, but I have three Vizios that were made for the budget conscientious consumers, and THEY at least let you pick your inputs by category. You are able to name your channels though, which is nice, I guess.

Overall, I am definitely experiencing buyer's remorse with this. It's not a good set. It's OKAY, but below average. If I had payed more than $230, then I would be outright livid. An okay price would be around $150, new. The screen itself isn't that bad, but the buck stops there. I was kicking myself for not getting the 40" TCL on Thanksgiving Day before I got this. Now I'm Chuck-Norris-roundhouse-kicking myself.

Pros:
+ The screen looks pretty good (for LED LCD, not RGB or WLED) in still shots
+ 3 HDMI inputs
+ It didn't explode when I plugged it in

Cons:
- The screen seems to have a bit of blur
- TERRIBLE sound
- Working AROUND the terrible sound is near-impossible
- Working the TV/remote is a chore
- Shoddy build quality

The verdict: Not recommended.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 16, 2012 11:17 AM PDT


Razer Onza tournament edition -Xbox 360
Razer Onza tournament edition -Xbox 360
Offered by Your Favorite Website
Price: $149.89
9 used & new from $36.49

4.0 out of 5 stars Great FPS / Action / Adventure pad, but could use some tweaks., May 8, 2011
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
NOTE: I personally own the DA2 version, which only has cosmetic changes.

I have some suggestions for a redeux of the Onza TE, having dropped in about 20 hours of use:

1. The sticks, A, B, X, & Y and ergonomics are most excellent. Don't mess with them. I really the adjustable tension on the sticks. Makes using high sensitivity settings on FPS games feasible. The sticks are also longer than normal, have what feels to be even LESS of a deadzone (not in a bad way), and the entire pad's soft rubbery coating is excellent. The screw holes on the back of the pad are also filled in with rubber plugs, for added comfort.

2. The buttons of the D - pad have a bit too much throw. Perhaps they should also be hyperresponse, like the action buttons. I love that they are split, but pushing them in rapid succession (typing text and the like) becomes a chore.

3. The triggers feel mushy, in a sense. And they swoop forward too much. They should also snap back into place faster. I swear I can squeeze them faster than they can recoil.

'4. The programmable buttons are in a bit of an odd place. I feel they should be where the middle fingers rest on the underside of the controller. Then you wouldn't even need to take your fingers off of the triggers. Hyperresponse is not really needed for these.

5. The Start / Back buttons are in an odd place. They also require a bit more force to push than I think is required. Perhaps if they were shaped like parentheses around the guide button, they would be in a familiar place without risking accidental pressings, of course I haven't had an issue with that myself, and I have grizzly bear paws.

6. The bumpers and Start/Back all have quite a high threshold for the mechanical switches, in stark contrast to the four action buttons. Don't mess with the action buttons, they are perfect, but putting softer switches in the other six would probably be a good idea. With the programmable buttons I hardly ever even use the Stick buttons anymore, so leave them alone as well.

Other than those shortcomings, it's a great controller and I still far prefer it to the stock MicroSoft pad. It's also a great first attempt for any company, really. I look forward to an "Onza Mark II" or possibly Razer Sabertooth, or Ocelot, or something.

And please for the love of all that is holy, Razer, make one of these for the PS3. Who cares if it's licensed or not, the DS3 absolutely sucks for FPS, as well as almost every other genre. Don't say it works for fighters, because back in the day, the excuse for sucking at fighters on the PSX was the controller, and that the Sega Saturn Model 2 pad was better. I use both my PS3 and 360 equally (for the most part), so I know what I'm talking about, not just fanboy rage. Games are what matters, not what they're played on. However, with this pad, I may just buy exclusively for the 360.

Thank you and I really do enjoy this wonderful piece of tech, it's just not perfect. Yet.

Pros:
Hyperresponse action buttons feel/work great (backlight is nice too, even if the responsible LEDs are slightly visible)
The sticks are responsive, taller, and the adjustable tension works well
Nice rubbery coating on the shell of the controller, with rubber plugs in the holes
Braided, super long 15' cord
Soft touch texture
GREAT ergonomics
The packaging is quite nice
Segmented D-pad prevents accidental diagonals
Programmable buttons let you keep your thumbs on the sticks

Cons:
Segmented D-Pad has a large throw, making multiple presses a chore (also, terrible for fighting games, but this isn't marketed as such)
Programmable buttons could be better located, really easy to press them instead of the LB/RB buttons
Start,Back, and all bumpers have high threshold microswitches, requiring a harder-than-normal press
Start and Back are in an odd place
The triggers are oddly shaped and feel mushy, with a slow recoil

It's definitely better than stock MS, but could be much better. NOW MAKE A PS3 PAD THAT DOESN'T SUCK!


Razer Onza tournament edition Dragon Age II
Razer Onza tournament edition Dragon Age II

4.0 out of 5 stars Great FPS / Action / Adventure pad, but could use some tweaks., May 8, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I have some suggestions for a redeux of the Onza TE, having dropped in about 20 hours of use:

1. The sticks, A, B, X, & Y and ergonomics are most excellent. Don't mess with them. I really the adjustable tension on the sticks. Makes using high sensitivity settings on FPS games feasible. The sticks are also longer than normal, have what feels to be even LESS of a deadzone (not in a bad way), and the entire pad's soft rubbery coating is excellent. The screw holes on the back of the pad are also filled in with rubber plugs, for added comfort.

2. The buttons of the D - pad have a bit too much throw. Perhaps they should also be hyperresponse, like the action buttons. I love that they are split, but pushing them in rapid succession (typing text and the like) becomes a chore.

3. The triggers feel mushy, in a sense. And they swoop forward too much. They should also snap back into place faster. I swear I can squeeze them faster than they can recoil.

'4. The programmable buttons are in a bit of an odd place. I feel they should be where the middle fingers rest on the underside of the controller. Then you wouldn't even need to take your fingers off of the triggers. Hyperresponse is not really needed for these.

5. The Start / Back buttons are in an odd place. They also require a bit more force to push than I think is required. Perhaps if they were shaped like parentheses around the guide button, they would be in a familiar place without risking accidental pressings, of course I haven't had an issue with that myself, and I have grizzly bear paws.

6. The bumpers and Start/Back all have quite a high threshold for the mechanical switches, in stark contrast to the four action buttons. Don't mess with the action buttons, they are perfect, but putting softer switches in the other six would probably be a good idea. With the programmable buttons I hardly ever even use the Stick buttons anymore, so leave them alone as well.

Other than those shortcomings, it's a great controller and I still far prefer it to the stock MicroSoft pad. It's also a great first attempt for any company, really. I look forward to an "Onza Mark II" or possibly Razer Sabertooth, or Ocelot, or something.

And please for the love of all that is holy, Razer, make one of these for the PS3. Who cares if it's licensed or not, the DS3 absolutely sucks for FPS, as well as almost every other genre. Don't say it works for fighters, because back in the day, the excuse for sucking at fighters on the PSX was the controller, and that the Sega Saturn Model 2 pad was better. I use both my PS3 and 360 equally (for the most part), so I know what I'm talking about, not just fanboy rage. Games are what matters, not what they're played on. However, with this pad, I may just buy exclusively for the 360.

Thank you and I really do enjoy this wonderful piece of tech, it's just not perfect. Yet.

Pros:
Hyperresponse action buttons feel/work great (backlight is nice too, even if the responsible LEDs are slightly visible)
The sticks are responsive, taller, and the adjustable tension works well
Nice rubbery coating on the shell of the controller, with rubber plugs in the holes
Braided, super long 15' cord
Soft touch texture
Teh Hawke graphic
GREAT ergonomics
Segmented D-pad prevents accidental diagonals
Programmable buttons let you keep your thumbs on the sticks

Cons:
Segmented D-Pad has a large throw, making multiple presses a chore (also, terrible for fighting games, but this isn't marketed as such)
Programmable buttons could be better located, really easy to press them instead of the LB/RB buttons
Start,Back, and all bumpers have high threshold microswitches, requiring a harder-than-normal press
Start and Back are in an odd place
The triggers are oddly shaped and feel mushy, with a slow recoil

It's definitely better than stock MS, but could be much better. NOW MAKE A PS3 PAD THAT DOESN'T SUCK!


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