Profile for JRob > Reviews

Browse

JRob's Profile

Customer Reviews: 44
Top Reviewer Ranking: 25,338,591
Helpful Votes: 237


Community Features
Review Discussion Boards
Top Reviewers

Guidelines: Learn more about the ins and outs of Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
JRob RSS Feed (IL USA)

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
pixel
Dead Famous: A Mallory Novel
Dead Famous: A Mallory Novel
by Carol O'Connell
Edition: Hardcover
167 used & new from $0.01

0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dead Right!, January 11, 2005
I just "discovered" Carol O'Connell and right off the mark she is on my top 10 list of mystrey writers. If you love Elizabeth George, P. D. James, Ruth Rendell, Ray Bradbury - great stories with 3-D characters in complete worlds with believable dialog and understandable motivation - then do yourself a favor and hook yourself up with Dead Famous. I can't wait to see this adapted for TV (as long as Will Smith has NOTHING to do with the project!) Enjoy!


The Instinct to Heal: Curing Stress, Anxiety, and Depression Without Drugs and Without Talk Therapy
The Instinct to Heal: Curing Stress, Anxiety, and Depression Without Drugs and Without Talk Therapy
by David Servan-Schreiber
Edition: Hardcover
97 used & new from $0.01

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars First Book To Help Me, November 24, 2004
I have been battling depression (aka: The Big D) for over two years - since I was riffed - and this is the first book to actually help me. A lot of the books on depression seemed to be too academic. Or they focused on somebody else's depression. This book really talked to me. There are valuable suggestions, lots of practical advice, enough experimental data to make it sound like it might actually work for me, and no preaching. I highly recomend it to anybody who is fighting depression or knows somebody who is.


Silverlance
Silverlance
by Peter Thomas Crowell
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $19.95
54 used & new from $0.01

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Great First Book, October 30, 2004
This review is from: Silverlance (Hardcover)
I started my daughters reading by reading to them well beyond when they were reading themselves. We read a lot of "chapter books" - Redwall, Madeleine L'Engle, C. S. Lewis, even the first few Harry Potter stories. Our youngest is now 16, so I don't read to them anymore, but if I did this book would be in our stack.

As a sci-fi fan, I liked the different magical races living alongside humans - satyrs, centaurs, dwarves, dryads, etc. And I very much liked the coming of age theme. The characters are given enough detail to interest the reader while not getting in the way of the story line. There was a lot of action, with the different characters having to pull together to solve problems that lay in their way. The length seemed just about right.

Some may feel there was too much in this first book - too many characters, too many crises, too many beings ready to help them along their way. I would put this book in the pre-teen category - ages 9 to 12-ish. Maybe, but I am still looking forward to seeing Peter Crowell's next book.


The Da Vinci Code
The Da Vinci Code
by Dan Brown
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $17.38
4280 used & new from $0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars OHMYGOD!, May 15, 2003
This review is from: The Da Vinci Code (Hardcover)
This was the most fun I have had reading a book in a long time. A really tightly written murder mystery wrapped in an enigma. Great characters, fast action (454 pages and most of the story takes place in about 18 hours), plot twists to make your head spin, Art, Religion, History . . . Sorry, I have to get back to reading it AGAIN!


Internet-Enabled Business Intelligence
Internet-Enabled Business Intelligence
by W. A. Giovinazzo
Edition: Paperback
10 used & new from $9.75

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Must Have" For Your E-BI Library, October 3, 2002
If you are involved in E-Business Intelligence, then this is a book worth reading. I enjoyed Kimball's "Building the Data Webhouse" and Mena's "Mining your web site", but this book takes a different perspective on the subject. Each of these books provide their own view on how the Internet had affected business intelligence.
There is a lot of detail in this book that would make it of interest to an implementer. It discusses many of the technologies used to build an Internet enabled application, such as XML, CWMI and Java. For example, in the section on Java, the author discusses the Java beans, the OLAP API and the data mining API. The book even provides some discussion on how you can use an application server in a business intelligence system.
I would definitely recommend this to any IT professional interested in the subject.


The Dive From Clausen's Pier
The Dive From Clausen's Pier
by Ann Packer
Edition: Hardcover
390 used & new from $0.01

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Diving for dollars?, May 16, 2002
I liked the plot, the characters, the prose. So why didn't I really, really like this book? I think the story is just a little creepy. Like being stuck in a backup on the highway and thinking that all those other people are sick for rubber-necking. But then you get up to the scene and you find yourself looking, too. And then, when you get past, realizing that you are one of those people rubber-necking. I guess I'd rather that the story dives below the surface of the seemingly heartless actions of the main character and seems to ask us what we would do if we were there. I don't always like what I see in that mirror.


Living Proof
Living Proof
by Michael Gearin-Tosh
Edition: Hardcover
51 used & new from $0.01

3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I'd rather not walk a mile in those moccasins, May 16, 2002
This review is from: Living Proof (Hardcover)
For the longest time I felt like I was 24 years old. Right up to about 45. Then I found I was very interested. This is just the kind of book I now like. Not that I want to scare myself - I just want to hear about somebody that stops to think about the very mixed messages we often receive from "experts" and then goes on to explore the options. And then takes the time to tell us about it.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Dec 16, 2012 1:37 AM PST


The Shipping News
The Shipping News
by Annie Proulx
Edition: Paperback
Price: $12.82
1228 used & new from $0.01

2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars That which does not kill me . . ., March 26, 2002
This review is from: The Shipping News (Paperback)
Nietsche asks us not to read his books "like a looting soldiers," choosing appealing passages at random from his aphorisms; instead, we are to read ourselves into "a passionate mood" in order to perceive the short rays of light that will lead us onward and upward. Annie Proulx gives a the story of an outsider, somebody who is a little slow, a little off, a shy - whose world is less than great. Way less than great. She hints at his character in the first line of the book - "Quoyle: A coil of rope". He will be used. He falls into both opportunities and his own private hell. I liked the style of the writing, the quirkiness of the characters, the strangeness of the setting, the magic of it all. It reminds me of Vonnegut (Welcome To The Monkey House, Slaughterhouse Five, The Sirens Of Titan). I hope you enjoy it also.


Machine Beauty: Elegance And The Heart Of Technology (Repr ed) (Masterminds)
Machine Beauty: Elegance And The Heart Of Technology (Repr ed) (Masterminds)
by David Gelernter
Edition: Paperback
Price: $12.76
83 used & new from $0.01

8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The machine may be beautiful, but . . ., March 11, 2002
The author seems to have started out with a premise I have held to since I read "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance" when I was in college. My first computer teacher, Ted Nelson, turned me on to the intrinsic beauty in things computerish with his enormously quirky "Computer Revolution/Dream Machines". My wife is a designer and I am in computers. We have had many long conversations about the false division drawn between art and science. So I thought I might have found a new soulmate when I picked up this little (176 pages) book. Too bad it wasn't so. Oh, Gelernter seems to be going the same way initially, even if I found the prose, and especially the examples, a little rough. But he just couldn't hold me. I found him spending too much time defending from his soapbox rather than illuminating. He seemed to be trying to write the textbook for a college course he wants to teach instead of reaching out to the reader. I don't think I could wholeheartedly recommend this book to my personal friends, so I can't recommend it to you either. Maybe next time.


Quite Ugly One Morning
Quite Ugly One Morning
by Christopher Brookmyre
Edition: Paperback
Price: $9.80
88 used & new from $0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars Ugly is also in the eye of the beholder, March 3, 2002
This review is from: Quite Ugly One Morning (Paperback)
...I wandered into a bookshop and found this gem. This is one old-style hard-boiled crime novels with REALLY UGLY bad guys and an almost suprehero good guy - in this case a hard case Scottish journalist who has seen and done it all. He practically trips over the throat slashing victim and considers the murder a "creative masterpiece". Think Phillip Marlowe, but in black jeans. Things get messier and messier. Not quite a quick read (214 pages), but if you like this sort of thing when feeding your own escapist tendencies, I think you'll join me in eagerly awaiting more from Chritopher Brookmyre.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5