Profile for David S. Pearlman > Reviews

Browse

David S. Pearlman's Profile

Customer Reviews: 1
Top Reviewer Ranking: 27,856,176
Helpful Votes: 25


Community Features
Review Discussion Boards
Top Reviewers

Guidelines: Learn more about the ins and outs of Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
David S. Pearlman RSS Feed
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Digital Food Photography
Digital Food Photography
by Lou Manna
Edition: Paperback
Price: $26.48
70 used & new from $2.08

25 of 29 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Don't Judge A Book By Its Cover..., January 5, 2009
Lou Manna's book Digital Food Photography is a MUST MISS for any photographer searching for material on how to light food for photography purposes. To begin with, I believe photographers looking to purchase books such as these are not as interested in learning techniques on how to poach a pear, create grill marks on a steak or turn Elmer's Glue into milk for a bowl of cereal (which Manna amply covers). More than likely, they are looking for lighting techniques. After all, properly lighting food is 90% of the battle in most well produced photographic imagery. I sent Manna an email telling him that I was somewhat disappointed that he didn't add any lighting diagrams to show how he lit any of his food images in his nearly 300-page mess. His email reply stated defensively that he mentions time and time again that this is a book for beginners. Due to the complexity of some of the topics he does cover, such as composition and how to make fake ice cream from his secret recipe, one would expect lighting (the single most important aspect in all photography) would be one of the topics covered. Interestingly enough, Manna encourages his readers to contact him - which I did. Sadly, once I got him on the phone I quickly discovered that this entire set up is for him to take your credit card to then give you high-priced, over the phone lessons. He doesn't even allow you to get a word in edgewise until you give him your credit card information so he can bill you for his time. My cell phone must have quit on me, for the next thing I knew, I received a voice mail from him screaming at me and telling me that I need to call him immediately and apologize for hanging up on him. In my opinion, Manna has a couple of screws loose.

If there is a literature equivalent to the cinema's Raspberry Award and karma is indeed a fact of life, I am certain Manna's book will achieve that honor.


Page: 1