Profile for Steven H. Propp > Reviews

Browse

Steven H. Propp's Profile

Customer Reviews: 8854
Top Reviewer Ranking: 76
Helpful Votes: 8208




Community Features
Review Discussion Boards
Top Reviewers

Guidelines: Learn more about the ins and outs of Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Steven H. Propp RSS Feed (Sacramento, CA USA)
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20
pixel
Your God Is Too Small: A Guide for Believers and Skeptics Alike
Your God Is Too Small: A Guide for Believers and Skeptics Alike
by J.B. Phillips
Edition: Paperback
33 used & new from $3.98

5.0 out of 5 stars A CLASSIC OF "MAINSTREAM" POPULAR CHRISTIAN WRITING, July 26, 2014
John Bertram Phillips (1906-1982) was a Bible translator, writer and Anglican clergyman; he wrote in the Introduction to this 1955 book, "Many [Christians] ... know that God is immeasurably 'bigger' than our forefathers imagined, and modern scientific discovery only confirms their belief that man has only just begun to comprehend the incredibly complex Being who is behind what we call 'life.' Many men and women today are living... without any faith in God at all... because they have not found with their adult minds a God big enough to 'account for' life, big enough to 'fit in with' the new scientific age... It is the purpose of this book to attempt two things: first to expose the inadequate conceptions of God which still linger unconsciously in many minds, and which prevent our catching a glimpse of the true God; and secondly to suggest ways in which we can find the real God for ourselves."

[NOTE: page numbers refer to the 124-page paperback edition.]

He argues that "without God no one has any authority to advance in support of his ideas of 'right,' except his own moral sense. Unless there is a God by whom 'right' and 'wrong' can be reliably assessed, moral judgements can be no more than opinion, influenced by upbringing, training, and propaganda." (Pg. 17)

He states that "The thoughtful man outside the Churches is not offended so much by the differences of denominations... No denomination has a monopoly of God's grace, and none has an exclusive recipe for producing Christian character... the real God takes no notice whatever of the boxes... and is subject to no regulation of man." (Pg. 39)

He observes that "We can visualize a beautiful thing but not beauty... Yet once we have a beautiful thing held in our minds it is comparatively easy to fill the mind with other beauties... if we are once convinced of a certain fact... we can at once think of a world of truths---we begin to visualize the absolute quality of Truth." (Pg. 72)

He summarizes, "We can never have too big a conception of God, and the more scientific knowledge (in whatever field) advances, the greater becomes our idea of His vast and complicated wisdom. Yet unless we are to remain befogged ... we have to accept His planned focusing of Himself in a human being, Jesus Christ. If we accept this as fact, as THE fact of history, it becomes possible to find a satisfactory and comprehensive answer to a great many problems, and ... a reasonable 'shelf' on which the unsolved perplexities may be left with every confidence." (Pg. 120-121)

Probably too "genteel" for most modern tastes, Phillips' book is still a quiet, reflective journey back to the spirituality of an earlier, less complicated time.


Your God is too small
Your God is too small
by J. B. Phillips
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
6 used & new from $1.25

5.0 out of 5 stars A CLASSIC OF "MAINSTREAM" POPULAR CHRISTIAN WRITING, July 26, 2014
John Bertram Phillips (1906-1982) was a Bible translator, writer and Anglican clergyman; he wrote in the Introduction to this 1955 book, "Many [Christians] ... know that God is immeasurably 'bigger' than our forefathers imagined, and modern scientific discovery only confirms their belief that man has only just begun to comprehend the incredibly complex Being who is behind what we call 'life.' Many men and women today are living... without any faith in God at all... because they have not found with their adult minds a God big enough to 'account for' life, big enough to 'fit in with' the new scientific age... It is the purpose of this book to attempt two things: first to expose the inadequate conceptions of God which still linger unconsciously in many minds, and which prevent our catching a glimpse of the true God; and secondly to suggest ways in which we can find the real God for ourselves."

[NOTE: page numbers refer to the 124-page paperback edition.]

He argues that "without God no one has any authority to advance in support of his ideas of 'right,' except his own moral sense. Unless there is a God by whom 'right' and 'wrong' can be reliably assessed, moral judgements can be no more than opinion, influenced by upbringing, training, and propaganda." (Pg. 17)

He states that "The thoughtful man outside the Churches is not offended so much by the differences of denominations... No denomination has a monopoly of God's grace, and none has an exclusive recipe for producing Christian character... the real God takes no notice whatever of the boxes... and is subject to no regulation of man." (Pg. 39)

He observes that "We can visualize a beautiful thing but not beauty... Yet once we have a beautiful thing held in our minds it is comparatively easy to fill the mind with other beauties... if we are once convinced of a certain fact... we can at once think of a world of truths---we begin to visualize the absolute quality of Truth." (Pg. 72)

He summarizes, "We can never have too big a conception of God, and the more scientific knowledge (in whatever field) advances, the greater becomes our idea of His vast and complicated wisdom. Yet unless we are to remain befogged ... we have to accept His planned focusing of Himself in a human being, Jesus Christ. If we accept this as fact, as THE fact of history, it becomes possible to find a satisfactory and comprehensive answer to a great many problems, and ... a reasonable 'shelf' on which the unsolved perplexities may be left with every confidence." (Pg. 120-121)

Probably too "genteel" for most modern tastes, Phillips' book is still a quiet, reflective journey back to the spirituality of an earlier, less complicated time.


Your god is Too Small
Your god is Too Small
by J. B. Phillips
Edition: Paperback
4 used & new from $4.99

5.0 out of 5 stars A CLASSIC OF "MAINSTREAM" POPULAR CHRISTIAN WRITING, July 26, 2014
This review is from: Your god is Too Small (Paperback)
John Bertram Phillips (1906-1982) was a Bible translator, writer and Anglican clergyman; he wrote in the Introduction to this 1955 book, "Many [Christians] ... know that God is immeasurably 'bigger' than our forefathers imagined, and modern scientific discovery only confirms their belief that man has only just begun to comprehend the incredibly complex Being who is behind what we call 'life.' Many men and women today are living... without any faith in God at all... because they have not found with their adult minds a God big enough to 'account for' life, big enough to 'fit in with' the new scientific age... It is the purpose of this book to attempt two things: first to expose the inadequate conceptions of God which still linger unconsciously in many minds, and which prevent our catching a glimpse of the true God; and secondly to suggest ways in which we can find the real God for ourselves."

[NOTE: page numbers refer to the 124-page paperback edition.]

He argues that "without God no one has any authority to advance in support of his ideas of 'right,' except his own moral sense. Unless there is a God by whom 'right' and 'wrong' can be reliably assessed, moral judgements can be no more than opinion, influenced by upbringing, training, and propaganda." (Pg. 17)

He states that "The thoughtful man outside the Churches is not offended so much by the differences of denominations... No denomination has a monopoly of God's grace, and none has an exclusive recipe for producing Christian character... the real God takes no notice whatever of the boxes... and is subject to no regulation of man." (Pg. 39)

He observes that "We can visualize a beautiful thing but not beauty... Yet once we have a beautiful thing held in our minds it is comparatively easy to fill the mind with other beauties... if we are once convinced of a certain fact... we can at once think of a world of truths---we begin to visualize the absolute quality of Truth." (Pg. 72)

He summarizes, "We can never have too big a conception of God, and the more scientific knowledge (in whatever field) advances, the greater becomes our idea of His vast and complicated wisdom. Yet unless we are to remain befogged ... we have to accept His planned focusing of Himself in a human being, Jesus Christ. If we accept this as fact, as THE fact of history, it becomes possible to find a satisfactory and comprehensive answer to a great many problems, and ... a reasonable 'shelf' on which the unsolved perplexities may be left with every confidence." (Pg. 120-121)

Probably too "genteel" for most modern tastes, Phillips' book is still a quiet, reflective journey back to the spirituality of an earlier, less complicated time.


By J.B. Phillips - Your God Is Too Small: A Guide for Believers and Skeptics Alike (4/25/04)
By J.B. Phillips - Your God Is Too Small: A Guide for Believers and Skeptics Alike (4/25/04)
by J.B. Phillips
Edition: Paperback
5 used & new from $14.46

5.0 out of 5 stars A CLASSIC OF "MAINSTREAM" POPULAR CHRISTIAN WRITING, July 26, 2014
John Bertram Phillips (1906-1982) was a Bible translator, writer and Anglican clergyman; he wrote in the Introduction to this 1955 book, "Many [Christians] ... know that God is immeasurably 'bigger' than our forefathers imagined, and modern scientific discovery only confirms their belief that man has only just begun to comprehend the incredibly complex Being who is behind what we call 'life.' Many men and women today are living... without any faith in God at all... because they have not found with their adult minds a God big enough to 'account for' life, big enough to 'fit in with' the new scientific age... It is the purpose of this book to attempt two things: first to expose the inadequate conceptions of God which still linger unconsciously in many minds, and which prevent our catching a glimpse of the true God; and secondly to suggest ways in which we can find the real God for ourselves."

[NOTE: page numbers refer to the 124-page paperback edition.]

He argues that "without God no one has any authority to advance in support of his ideas of 'right,' except his own moral sense. Unless there is a God by whom 'right' and 'wrong' can be reliably assessed, moral judgements can be no more than opinion, influenced by upbringing, training, and propaganda." (Pg. 17)

He states that "The thoughtful man outside the Churches is not offended so much by the differences of denominations... No denomination has a monopoly of God's grace, and none has an exclusive recipe for producing Christian character... the real God takes no notice whatever of the boxes... and is subject to no regulation of man." (Pg. 39)

He observes that "We can visualize a beautiful thing but not beauty... Yet once we have a beautiful thing held in our minds it is comparatively easy to fill the mind with other beauties... if we are once convinced of a certain fact... we can at once think of a world of truths---we begin to visualize the absolute quality of Truth." (Pg. 72)

He summarizes, "We can never have too big a conception of God, and the more scientific knowledge (in whatever field) advances, the greater becomes our idea of His vast and complicated wisdom. Yet unless we are to remain befogged ... we have to accept His planned focusing of Himself in a human being, Jesus Christ. If we accept this as fact, as THE fact of history, it becomes possible to find a satisfactory and comprehensive answer to a great many problems, and ... a reasonable 'shelf' on which the unsolved perplexities may be left with every confidence." (Pg. 120-121)

Probably too "genteel" for most modern tastes, Phillips' book is still a quiet, reflective journey back to the spirituality of an earlier, less complicated time.


Your God Is Too Small
Your God Is Too Small
by J. B. Phillips
Edition: Paperback
4 used & new from $1.75

5.0 out of 5 stars A CLASSIC OF "MAINSTREAM" POPULAR CHRISTIAN WRITING, July 26, 2014
This review is from: Your God Is Too Small (Paperback)
John Bertram Phillips (1906-1982) was a Bible translator, writer and Anglican clergyman; he wrote in the Introduction to this 1955 book, "Many [Christians] ... know that God is immeasurably 'bigger' than our forefathers imagined, and modern scientific discovery only confirms their belief that man has only just begun to comprehend the incredibly complex Being who is behind what we call 'life.' Many men and women today are living... without any faith in God at all... because they have not found with their adult minds a God big enough to 'account for' life, big enough to 'fit in with' the new scientific age... It is the purpose of this book to attempt two things: first to expose the inadequate conceptions of God which still linger unconsciously in many minds, and which prevent our catching a glimpse of the true God; and secondly to suggest ways in which we can find the real God for ourselves."

[NOTE: page numbers refer to the 124-page paperback edition.]

He argues that "without God no one has any authority to advance in support of his ideas of 'right,' except his own moral sense. Unless there is a God by whom 'right' and 'wrong' can be reliably assessed, moral judgements can be no more than opinion, influenced by upbringing, training, and propaganda." (Pg. 17)

He states that "The thoughtful man outside the Churches is not offended so much by the differences of denominations... No denomination has a monopoly of God's grace, and none has an exclusive recipe for producing Christian character... the real God takes no notice whatever of the boxes... and is subject to no regulation of man." (Pg. 39)

He observes that "We can visualize a beautiful thing but not beauty... Yet once we have a beautiful thing held in our minds it is comparatively easy to fill the mind with other beauties... if we are once convinced of a certain fact... we can at once think of a world of truths---we begin to visualize the absolute quality of Truth." (Pg. 72)

He summarizes, "We can never have too big a conception of God, and the more scientific knowledge (in whatever field) advances, the greater becomes our idea of His vast and complicated wisdom. Yet unless we are to remain befogged ... we have to accept His planned focusing of Himself in a human being, Jesus Christ. If we accept this as fact, as THE fact of history, it becomes possible to find a satisfactory and comprehensive answer to a great many problems, and ... a reasonable 'shelf' on which the unsolved perplexities may be left with every confidence." (Pg. 120-121)

Probably too "genteel" for most modern tastes, Phillips' book is still a quiet, reflective journey back to the spirituality of an earlier, less complicated time.


Your God is too Small
Your God is too Small
by Phillips J B
Edition: Hardcover
4 used & new from $3.35

5.0 out of 5 stars A CLASSIC OF "MAINSTREAM" POPULAR CHRISTIAN WRITING, July 26, 2014
This review is from: Your God is too Small (Hardcover)
John Bertram Phillips (1906-1982) was a Bible translator, writer and Anglican clergyman; he wrote in the Introduction to this 1955 book, "Many [Christians] ... know that God is immeasurably 'bigger' than our forefathers imagined, and modern scientific discovery only confirms their belief that man has only just begun to comprehend the incredibly complex Being who is behind what we call 'life.' Many men and women today are living... without any faith in God at all... because they have not found with their adult minds a God big enough to 'account for' life, big enough to 'fit in with' the new scientific age... It is the purpose of this book to attempt two things: first to expose the inadequate conceptions of God which still linger unconsciously in many minds, and which prevent our catching a glimpse of the true God; and secondly to suggest ways in which we can find the real God for ourselves."

[NOTE: page numbers refer to the 124-page paperback edition.]

He argues that "without God no one has any authority to advance in support of his ideas of 'right,' except his own moral sense. Unless there is a God by whom 'right' and 'wrong' can be reliably assessed, moral judgements can be no more than opinion, influenced by upbringing, training, and propaganda." (Pg. 17)

He states that "The thoughtful man outside the Churches is not offended so much by the differences of denominations... No denomination has a monopoly of God's grace, and none has an exclusive recipe for producing Christian character... the real God takes no notice whatever of the boxes... and is subject to no regulation of man." (Pg. 39)

He observes that "We can visualize a beautiful thing but not beauty... Yet once we have a beautiful thing held in our minds it is comparatively easy to fill the mind with other beauties... if we are once convinced of a certain fact... we can at once think of a world of truths---we begin to visualize the absolute quality of Truth." (Pg. 72)

He summarizes, "We can never have too big a conception of God, and the more scientific knowledge (in whatever field) advances, the greater becomes our idea of His vast and complicated wisdom. Yet unless we are to remain befogged ... we have to accept His planned focusing of Himself in a human being, Jesus Christ. If we accept this as fact, as THE fact of history, it becomes possible to find a satisfactory and comprehensive answer to a great many problems, and ... a reasonable 'shelf' on which the unsolved perplexities may be left with every confidence." (Pg. 120-121)

Probably too "genteel" for most modern tastes, Phillips' book is still a quiet, reflective journey back to the spirituality of an earlier, less complicated time.


YOUR GOD IS TOO SMALL "Phillips
YOUR GOD IS TOO SMALL "Phillips
by J.B." 6
Edition: Unknown Binding
3 used & new from $10.00

5.0 out of 5 stars A CLASSIC OF "MAINSTREAM" POPULAR CHRISTIAN WRITING, July 26, 2014
This review is from: YOUR GOD IS TOO SMALL "Phillips
John Bertram Phillips (1906-1982) was a Bible translator, writer and Anglican clergyman; he wrote in the Introduction to this 1955 book, "Many [Christians] ... know that God is immeasurably 'bigger' than our forefathers imagined, and modern scientific discovery only confirms their belief that man has only just begun to comprehend the incredibly complex Being who is behind what we call 'life.' Many men and women today are living... without any faith in God at all... because they have not found with their adult minds a God big enough to 'account for' life, big enough to 'fit in with' the new scientific age... It is the purpose of this book to attempt two things: first to expose the inadequate conceptions of God which still linger unconsciously in many minds, and which prevent our catching a glimpse of the true God; and secondly to suggest ways in which we can find the real God for ourselves."

[NOTE: page numbers refer to the 124-page paperback edition.]

He argues that "without God no one has any authority to advance in support of his ideas of 'right,' except his own moral sense. Unless there is a God by whom 'right' and 'wrong' can be reliably assessed, moral judgements can be no more than opinion, influenced by upbringing, training, and propaganda." (Pg. 17)

He states that "The thoughtful man outside the Churches is not offended so much by the differences of denominations... No denomination has a monopoly of God's grace, and none has an exclusive recipe for producing Christian character... the real God takes no notice whatever of the boxes... and is subject to no regulation of man." (Pg. 39)

He observes that "We can visualize a beautiful thing but not beauty... Yet once we have a beautiful thing held in our minds it is comparatively easy to fill the mind with other beauties... if we are once convinced of a certain fact... we can at once think of a world of truths---we begin to visualize the absolute quality of Truth." (Pg. 72)

He summarizes, "We can never have too big a conception of God, and the more scientific knowledge (in whatever field) advances, the greater becomes our idea of His vast and complicated wisdom. Yet unless we are to remain befogged ... we have to accept His planned focusing of Himself in a human being, Jesus Christ. If we accept this as fact, as THE fact of history, it becomes possible to find a satisfactory and comprehensive answer to a great many problems, and ... a reasonable 'shelf' on which the unsolved perplexities may be left with every confidence." (Pg. 120-121)

Probably too "genteel" for most modern tastes, Phillips' book is still a quiet, reflective journey back to the spirituality of an earlier, less complicated time.


Your God Is Too Small, Macmillan 12th Printing 1971 Edition
Your God Is Too Small, Macmillan 12th Printing 1971 Edition
by J.B. Phillips
Edition: Paperback
4 used & new from $25.00

5.0 out of 5 stars A CLASSIC OF "MAINSTREAM" POPULAR CHRISTIAN WRITING, July 26, 2014
John Bertram Phillips (1906-1982) was a Bible translator, writer and Anglican clergyman; he wrote in the Introduction to this 1955 book, "Many [Christians] ... know that God is immeasurably 'bigger' than our forefathers imagined, and modern scientific discovery only confirms their belief that man has only just begun to comprehend the incredibly complex Being who is behind what we call 'life.' Many men and women today are living... without any faith in God at all... because they have not found with their adult minds a God big enough to 'account for' life, big enough to 'fit in with' the new scientific age... It is the purpose of this book to attempt two things: first to expose the inadequate conceptions of God which still linger unconsciously in many minds, and which prevent our catching a glimpse of the true God; and secondly to suggest ways in which we can find the real God for ourselves."

He argues that "without God no one has any authority to advance in support of his ideas of 'right,' except his own moral sense. Unless there is a God by whom 'right' and 'wrong' can be reliably assessed, moral judgements can be no more than opinion, influenced by upbringing, training, and propaganda." (Pg. 17)

He states that "The thoughtful man outside the Churches is not offended so much by the differences of denominations... No denomination has a monopoly of God's grace, and none has an exclusive recipe for producing Christian character... the real God takes no notice whatever of the boxes... and is subject to no regulation of man." (Pg. 39)

He observes that "We can visualize a beautiful thing but not beauty... Yet once we have a beautiful thing held in our minds it is comparatively easy to fill the mind with other beauties... if we are once convinced of a certain fact... we can at once think of a world of truths---we begin to visualize the absolute quality of Truth." (Pg. 72)

He summarizes, "We can never have too big a conception of God, and the more scientific knowledge (in whatever field) advances, the greater becomes our idea of His vast and complicated wisdom. Yet unless we are to remain befogged ... we have to accept His planned focusing of Himself in a human being, Jesus Christ. If we accept this as fact, as THE fact of history, it becomes possible to find a satisfactory and comprehensive answer to a great many problems, and ... a reasonable 'shelf' on which the unsolved perplexities may be left with every confidence." (Pg. 120-121)

Probably too "genteel" for most modern tastes, Phillips' book is still a quiet, reflective journey back to the spirituality of an earlier, less complicated time.


Your God Is Too Small: A Guide for Believers and Skeptics Alike by Phillips, J.B. (2004) Paperback
Your God Is Too Small: A Guide for Believers and Skeptics Alike by Phillips, J.B. (2004) Paperback
by J.B. Phillips
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars A CLASSIC OF "MAINSTREAM" POPULAR CHRISTIAN WRITING, July 26, 2014
John Bertram Phillips (1906-1982) was a Bible translator, writer and Anglican clergyman; he wrote in the Introduction to this 1955 book, "Many [Christians] ... know that God is immeasurably 'bigger' than our forefathers imagined, and modern scientific discovery only confirms their belief that man has only just begun to comprehend the incredibly complex Being who is behind what we call 'life.' Many men and women today are living... without any faith in God at all... because they have not found with their adult minds a God big enough to 'account for' life, big enough to 'fit in with' the new scientific age... It is the purpose of this book to attempt two things: first to expose the inadequate conceptions of God which still linger unconsciously in many minds, and which prevent our catching a glimpse of the true God; and secondly to suggest ways in which we can find the real God for ourselves."

[NOTE: page numbers refer to the 124-page paperback edition.]

He argues that "without God no one has any authority to advance in support of his ideas of 'right,' except his own moral sense. Unless there is a God by whom 'right' and 'wrong' can be reliably assessed, moral judgements can be no more than opinion, influenced by upbringing, training, and propaganda." (Pg. 17)

He states that "The thoughtful man outside the Churches is not offended so much by the differences of denominations... No denomination has a monopoly of God's grace, and none has an exclusive recipe for producing Christian character... the real God takes no notice whatever of the boxes... and is subject to no regulation of man." (Pg. 39)

He observes that "We can visualize a beautiful thing but not beauty... Yet once we have a beautiful thing held in our minds it is comparatively easy to fill the mind with other beauties... if we are once convinced of a certain fact... we can at once think of a world of truths---we begin to visualize the absolute quality of Truth." (Pg. 72)

He summarizes, "We can never have too big a conception of God, and the more scientific knowledge (in whatever field) advances, the greater becomes our idea of His vast and complicated wisdom. Yet unless we are to remain befogged ... we have to accept His planned focusing of Himself in a human being, Jesus Christ. If we accept this as fact, as THE fact of history, it becomes possible to find a satisfactory and comprehensive answer to a great many problems, and ... a reasonable 'shelf' on which the unsolved perplexities may be left with every confidence." (Pg. 120-121)

Probably too "genteel" for most modern tastes, Phillips' book is still a quiet, reflective journey back to the spirituality of an earlier, less complicated time.


The Gospel According to John (The New International Commentary on the New Testament)
The Gospel According to John (The New International Commentary on the New Testament)
by Leon Morris
Edition: Hardcover
35 used & new from $15.00

5.0 out of 5 stars AN EXCELLENT EVANGELICAL COMMENTARY ON THE FOURTH GOSPEL, July 25, 2014
Leon Lamb Morris (1914-2006) was an Australian New Testament scholar, who was ordained to the Anglican ministry, served as Warden of Tyndale House, Cambridge (1960-64); Principal of Ridley College in Melbourne (1964-1979), and was a Visiting Professor of New Testament at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School.

He says of the book's authorship, "The basic reason for holding that the author was John the Apostle is that this appears to be what the Gospel itself teaches... We have... a statement... that its author was the disciple whom Jesus loved. The Gospel itself seems to indicate that this man was John the Apostle... From the list of names given in 21:2... it seems that the Beloved disciple was one of the sons of Zebedee or else one of the unnamed disciples. If the latter, he must still have been one of the Twelve for he was present at the Last Supper and it seems that only the Twelve were present on that occasion (Mt 26:20; Mk 14:17, 20; Lk 22:14, 30). This rules out suggestions like Lazarus and John Mark. The Beloved Disciple appears to have stood in close relationship to Peter... From the other gospels we know that Peter, James and John formed a trio... As James was martyred early, this leaves John. This may be supported by the curious fact that John is not mentioned by name anywhere in this Gospel. It is not easy to think of a reason why any early Christians, other than John himself, should have completely omitted all mention of such a prominent Apostle." (Pg. 10-11) He acknowledges, "The biggest objection to this identification... is the contention that a man is not likely to refer to himself as `the disciple whom Jesus loved.' I agree. It does not seem a natural way of describing oneself. But then, it is countered, it is not a very natural way of describing anyone else either... So, while we recognize the fact that the objection if weighty, it does not seem weighty enough to cancel out the arguments adduced earlier." (Pg. 12)

He also admits, "The omissions of this Gospel are also to be noticed. Two of the more striking are those of the Transfiguration and the Agony of Gethsemane. Some go so far as to say that these omissions of incidents where John, along with Peter and James, had a special place of privilege, are sufficient to show that John did not write this Gospel. This is a strong argument. But perhaps both omissions are due to the fact that our author makes the essential point otherwise... Any argument on omissions must further reckon with the fact that... this writer has some extraordinary omissions. No really satisfactory explanation has ever been produced, for example, for the surprising fact that, though his account of the events in the upper room is much the fullest of the four we have, he says nothing about the institution of the Holy Communion. He must have known of this. It is important. Yet he omits it. We need not be too surprised then if he omits other incidents we regard as important." (Pg. 18-19) Later, Morris suggests, "John may have had in mind some who gave undue emphasis to the externals of sacramental religion. So he left out all formal mention of holy communion, which would certainly discourage over-emphasis." (Pg. 355)

He points out, "heretics gave this Gospel a warm welcome, and this may have deterred the orthodox. A Gospel which differed so much from the Three might well have perplexed the simple faithful. They were hesitant about it. And their hesitation increased when they found that certain heretics made a good deal of use of it. There can be no doubt about the Gnostic use of John. It appears to have been the favorite Gospel among the Gnostics. The first commentary on it was written by the Gnostic Hereleon... John was widely used as highly esteemed by the Gnostics. The importance of this find for Johannine criticism does not seem always to have been realized." (Pg. 22)

He also says, "It is a further point to be considered that there is a great difference in style between John and the Synoptists. One must always regard with a healthy respect the objection which says, `If Jesus was as he is depicted in Matthew and Mark and Luke, He cannot have been as he is depicted in John. The two are incompatible.' It certainly is the case that there are significant differences between the two portraits. The usual way of accounting for this difference is to say that in the Fourth Gospel we have the result of the prolonged meditation of the Beloved Disciple and that what he has produced in his view of what God has done in Christ rather than a factual account of what happened. I have more respect for this argument than for any of the others. But I do not think it will carry the weight that many scholars place upon it." (Pg. 45)

He observes, "It may be fairly argued in many cases that there was no reason why the synoptists should include some of the things John narrates. They had plenty of material of their own and in any case no one expects them to have known all the information that was at the disposal of the Fourth Evangelist. But in the case of the raising of Lazarus things are said to be different. The publicity of which John speaks makes it difficult to see how this miracle should not have been known to the synoptists. And if they did know it, and if it had the consequences that John says it had, it is difficult to see why they should have omitted it. They seem to give to the events associated with the triumphal entry and the cleansing of the temple the role of initiating the events that were to issue in the crucifixion, whereas for John it seems to be the raising of Lazarus which does this... if the traditional view that the reminiscences of St. Peter lie behind the Second Gospel is true, the silence of the synoptists may be explicable... the reason he said nothing about the raising of Lazarus was that he did not see it. It did not belong to his personal reminiscences... Its absence from Luke is more serious, but it has to be borne in mind that Luke's special source (or sources) appears to be episodic rather than a full chronological narrative. I do not maintain that this clears up all the difficulty, but it must be borne in mind so that the difficulty is not exaggerated." (Pg. 533-534)

He gives a very lengthy and detailed summation (Pg. 774-785) of ALL the arguments about whether the Last Supper was a Passover meal, vs. the Johannine chronology, and ultimately concludes, "I do not see how with our present knowledge we can be dogmatic. But on the whole it seems to me most probable that the explanation is to be found in calendrical confusion. The most natural reading of the Synoptists shows the meal there to be the Passover. The most natural reading of John shows Jesus crucified at the very time the Passover victims were slain in the temple... it seems preferable to see them as following different calendars." (Pg. 785)

This is a thoroughly conservative, scholarly, detailed commentary on the Fourth Gospel that will be of great help to those studying the gospel.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20