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Stout EcoSAfe-6400 Compostable Bags,0.85 Milliliters, 48 x 60, Green, 30/Carton (E4860E85)
Stout EcoSAfe-6400 Compostable Bags,0.85 Milliliters, 48 x 60, Green, 30/Carton (E4860E85)
Offered by Shoplet
Price: $40.82
30 used & new from $10.15

2.0 out of 5 stars Why did I buy such large bags!?, September 19, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Way too big, for the thickness. Don't think of loading anything too heavy in these bags, because they will break.


1954: The Year Willie Mays and the First Generation of Black Superstars Changed Major League Baseball Forever
1954: The Year Willie Mays and the First Generation of Black Superstars Changed Major League Baseball Forever
by Bill Madden
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $18.92
96 used & new from $6.86

2.0 out of 5 stars Recycled stories from "The Capitol of Baseball", August 19, 2014
After seeing Bill Madden on Brian Kenny's show on MLB, I thought I would like this more detailed review of what he declares as an important turning point in baseball integration. . . . It's sort of readable.
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It's a poorly threaded, disjointed retelling of thrice-told stories about Bill Veeck, Casey Stengel, Willie Mays and Leo Durocher that anyone who is familiar with the "Capitol of Baseball" knows all about. Madden has a moderately interesting thesis, that because both the Indians and Giants had key African-American players (1st time two integrated teams met in the WS), that 1954 because of Brown vs. Board of Education (which is barely mentioned in the book), was more important to baseball integration than 1947 was. This thesis is barely supported and key elements are ignored.

I would argue that 1948, when Bill Veeck brought in Satchel Paige, who then went 6-1 with a 165 ERA+ in 72 innings, and helped them win the pennant and WS was even more interesting!
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Madden suggest that Larry Doby, the first AL African American player, was the "dominant player in the American League," . . . This is ridiculous. Doby is a deserving HoF'er but in 1954, he was a top 10 player, below Mantle, Williams, Berra, Minosa (also black) and Avila (also on on Cleveland) in WAR . . . The book is filled with poorly supported contentions like this possibly because Madden fails to utilize modern baseball statistics (possibly because he's ignorant about them) like ZoneRating and OPS but spends quite a few pages writing about the BAvg championship efforts by Don Meuller and Bobby Avila.

The book's one interesting theme is that Cleveland's 111-win season interrupted an era of Yankee dominance (due to loss of Raschi and B.Martin and the injury to Mantle) and after playing each other during spring training 21 times (only 4 teams in AZ), the Giants swept them in the World Series (told much better in Leo Durocher's "Nice Guys Finish Last"). The other stories of the Yankees, and other teams' reticence to hire black ballplayers, the Yankee's "connection" with the KC A's, the Dodger's temporary fade, and Wilie May's greatness have all been covered more thoroughly, and with more insight, in other volumes.

This book is moderately entertaining, but certainly not worth paying full price.


The Bedwetter: Stories of Courage, Redemption, and Pee
The Bedwetter: Stories of Courage, Redemption, and Pee
by Sarah Silverman
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $10.40
33 used & new from $1.63

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Talented, but uggh -- not someone I really wanted to know more about., August 19, 2014
I really liked Sarah Silverman before I read this book - smart, sassy, attractive - but this poorly organized sort-of-autobio made me think she's an insecure, attention-craving loser. Probably both are true. The more I read, the more I realized, "no wonder she's not married!"


A Decisive Decade: An Insider's View of the Chicago Civil Rights Movement during the 1960s
A Decisive Decade: An Insider's View of the Chicago Civil Rights Movement during the 1960s
by Robert B. McKersie
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $25.73
46 used & new from $6.68

4.0 out of 5 stars It was what we expected., April 21, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Subject is not particularly interesting to me . . . I bought it as a gift for a family member who was close to the politics of Chicago in the 1960's-1970's. She enjoyed the read.


SodaStream MyWater Lemon-Lime Syrup, 40mL, 3-Pack
SodaStream MyWater Lemon-Lime Syrup, 40mL, 3-Pack
Offered by BarronOnline
Price: $19.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Great way to "touch" one's seltzer with lemon-lime flavor., January 26, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I love this product and can't always find it on the shelves where I obtain SodaStream products (or trade-in for CO2 "carbonators").
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I go through a lot of these!


Teva Men's Hurricane XLT Sandal,Wavy Trail/Insignia Blue,12 M US
Teva Men's Hurricane XLT Sandal,Wavy Trail/Insignia Blue,12 M US
Price: $59.95
9 used & new from $54.99

5.0 out of 5 stars I have been wearing these types of Teva's for 10+ years., September 2, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I look for a reasonably price, but I know I can wear this product comfortably for days at a time over 3~4 years before they wear out. Surprisingly good support for a sandal, I have worn these at WDWorld walking 2~4 miles a day on hard pavement..


The Power of Professional Presence: Get Their Attention and Keep It ! (Coach Stef - Advance Your Career Book 1)
The Power of Professional Presence: Get Their Attention and Keep It ! (Coach Stef - Advance Your Career Book 1)
Price: $3.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Re-vitalized my job search and self-image, August 29, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This is a short, very readable book that packs a powerful punch!
It helped me reconnect with what turns me on about myself and what I can bring to others in a (new) job.
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We are all filled with so much conflicting doubt and concern about how we did (or should do) about our career and yet we all feel powerful when we introspect a bit and realize a) What is that we do really well? b) What are some of the examples I can tell you about? and c) How does this connect with what I want to do next?
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Just a few short exercises and "games" that provided some useful help. (Whom do I want to model myself after and how does that help me show myself in the best way?) I can do that. This helped me reach out to new people with a much clearer message of what I want to bring to them. Good stuff.
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Great book Coach Stef!


The Wall Street Journal Online: One-Year Online Subscription
The Wall Street Journal Online: One-Year Online Subscription

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great product; awful subscription services., March 12, 2013
Reminds me of Sirius where the bait-and-switch, rip-you-off-if-you're-not-watching, subscription services stains the relatively good feelings I have from the product itself.
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My experience was sadly/reassuringly typical of others. I have been a reader of the print/on-line edition for 30+ years (!) and a subscriber for most. Yet, the recent price increases and the underhanded ways they were unannounced and tried to slip-by provides an awfully disappointing aftertaste.
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I am going to month-to-month (with 2 free months thrown in) now. I just started reading the Economist, which provides a great international perspective, and will be considering the Financial Times.


Satchel: The Life and Times of an American Legend
Satchel: The Life and Times of an American Legend
by Larry Tye
Edition: Paperback
Price: $13.33
90 used & new from $1.55

5.0 out of 5 stars Possibly the definitive work on the greatest Negro League baseball player, April 26, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
How can one pretend to know the history of baseball, or for that matter, United States history and race relations without knowing everything possible about Jackie Robinson? And the more I learned about the amazing story and details about Branch Rickey and Jackie Robinson (who played barely a half-season with the great post-WWII Kansas City Monarchs), the more I wanted to know about the peculiar, separate/segregated world of Negro League baseball.
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And while I was somewhat familiar with Josh Gibson (maybe the greatest ball player of all time!?), Bullet Joe Rogan, Rube & Willie Foster, Pop Lloyd, Willie Wells and others, NegroLeague baseball truly did revolve around one of the greatest pitchers and tied for (with Babe Ruth) the greatest baseball attraction of all time. It wasn't just because he was good (and he was!), he was a great showman, a charismatic personality, and he played professional baseball for a long, long time.
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Tye's well-researched biography begins with plenty of details about Leroy Robert Page/Paige's early life in Mobile, including speculation about how he got his nickname, his formative years in a reform school because his parents couldn't watch over him effectively (sound familiar?) where he learned to become a talented pitcher. Paige's early maturity in the 1920's corresponded with Rube Foster's formation of the first organized league of African-American professional baseball teams.

The book provides a good background on the circumstances and history of both Negro League baseball, including the competitive ownerships of Pittsburgh's Crawford's (owned by Gus Greenlee) and the Homestead Gray's (owned by Cum Posey). Satchel Paige, Tye point out, was essentially the first baseball "free agent" rarely adhering to team or league contractual agreements and regularly working wherever and with whatever team was willing to pay him to promote their game or event.

Paige made a lot of money . . . more than almost any professional athlete of his era (except for Babe Ruth). His barn-storming stints with Dizzy Dean's all-stars and then with Bob Feller served as evidence to hundreds of thousands that the best black ballplayers could play just as well as the best white ballplayers. Despite this grudging acceptance on the ballfield, traveling from city-to-city meant dealing with Jim Crow laws and an exhausting barrage of racism and second-class treatment at hotels, transportation services, restaurants and gas stations. It was a tough life that the biography provides a good flavor of how Paige dealt with this life as best as anyone could.

Paige's set himself apart from other professional ballplayers because he was so good for so long, and brought so much exuberance to the game that his fan-base grew and appreciated over many decades. Tye treats the dialectic that the best Negro League players felt about Jackie Robinson's signing with a nice touch. It was the beginning of the long-awaited integration of Major League Baseball (and Tye notes correctly that African-American's played at the top levels of professional baseball before "the gentleman's/racist's agreement" of 1887) via an unlikely candidate who wasn't considered one of the best black ballplayers and who many others ("there were lots of Satchel Paige's") felt jealous of.

Paige did finally make it into the Major Leagues in 1948, thanks to the irrepressible Bill Veeck and star Shortstop/Manager Lou Boudreau of the Cleveland Indians, who won their pennant by one game thanks in part to Paige's 6-1 record, including 2 shutouts . . . at 42 years old!

It's a story of triumph by a great American with immense talent, who started life with many disadvantages but never gave up. After being inducted into the Hall-of-Fame in 1971 and learning that his plaque would be segregated in a separate Negro League section, Paige dropped his playfulness and expressed the justifiable anger that had built up over decades of second-class treatment. It is this congruency of Paige and other NLeague ballplayers' excellence, triumph and shameful treatment that makes this book worth reading. While Buck O'Neill expressed joy that he was, "right on time," Paige's memorial service reminded his mourners not to be sad for him, but for all their fathers and grandfathers who never got to see the best ballplayers play against one another.


The Game from Where I Stand: A Ballplayer's Inside View
The Game from Where I Stand: A Ballplayer's Inside View
by Doug Glanville
Edition: Hardcover
96 used & new from $0.01

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Broad insider insight on professional baseball, May 31, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I've enjoyed Doug Glanville's column in the NYTimes which allowed him to comment on a wide range of issues that affect professional athletes, his experience playing baseball for money, and our perceptions as fans. He now writes for ESPN on what seems to be a narrower range of between-the-lines baseball subjects, which in my opinion is too limiting for his thoughtful perspectives.
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This book is excellent and represents a lot of thought (18 years worth, since he first signed a Minor League contract), excellent preparation (Doug is well-educated, has had broad exposures and seeks/gets help from many directions) and well delivered with a stream-of-thought, cross-referenced organization, solid fact-checking and good editing {I always look for typo's and couldn't find any}.
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I read A LOT of baseball books and this is the best 1st person narrative from a player's perspective I've ever read, barely nudging out the seminal "Long Season" by Brosnan, because of Glanville's introspection, intelligence, breadth of career (not an All-Star, but better than a journeyman) and mostly his perspective as a developing, transforming human being.
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He puts the whole baseball player thing (uncertainty, elation and satisfaction of making "the show"; craftmanship, aura and dedication to "respecting the game", fun, frolics and financial foibles of success as a big-time athlete; tempered by being mostly a singles hitter during the age of the substance-enhanced HomeRun era; and the sadness and acceptance of coming to the end of his career) into a great narrative perspective that I could relate to.
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Like, if I could run, hit, field and throw as well as he could . . . and write as well too, I could have written this book!
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Glanville's career spans an interesting transition time for MLB and his career in both leagues for strong and weak teams, watching all sort of human beings play and watch professional baseball gave him a great view, a Centerfielder's view he would say, on "the show". His perspective as an athlete, and as a man is strong and sensitive (dance lessons!) and his writing is superb.
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I am interested in what he chooses for an encore, because he has several books in him. This is a great read.


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