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Douglas E. Libert "howitt" RSS Feed (parkersburg wv)
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The Reign of Edward III: Crown and Political Scoeity in England, 1327-1377
The Reign of Edward III: Crown and Political Scoeity in England, 1327-1377
by W. M. Ormrod
Edition: Paperback
36 used & new from $1.42

5.0 out of 5 stars Scholarly shortened version of one of his more lengthy books., April 23, 2015
Remember during this period the English Monarchy is an oligarchy and slavery and the slave trade are big factors in the economics of the time, Edward seeming to make compromises with his nobles to avoid conflicts and enhance his treasury.Also the Catholic Papacy has moved from Rome to Avignon, France from about 1305AD to 1423 AD so there is much bickering in regard to this and Edward is the type of Monarch to use this to his advantage as other countries will also use this against Edward to their advantage. Edward was never so "pious" as to be manipulated and his dealings with the Papacy you can see the early begiinings of a complete falling away from Rome and the early buds of an Independent English Anglican church.
The book is a bit dry but the author is trying to cover research materials -so it comes off more analytical than entertaining,except for someone really into the period who would appreciate thorough research. Edward III is most definitely a strong monarch despite some of his powers and privileges being wrestled from him by the nobles. He is the King seen as the pivotal king of the Hundred Years War. The author spends little time analyzing the battle such as Crecy, etc. because the French were manipulative and always bought off the English and usually reversed any losses of territory to the English. The French strategy always seemed to be let the English get deep into French territories where they run into supply and health problems, then pay them to leave.
It looks like the Hundred Years War is mainly carried on by mercenary troops so Edward is always trying to sneak tax impositions through without attracting too much attention. He seems really good at this but the book never really goes much into in the "loans", from nobles and Italian Banking companies were paid back.Edward here presented as making the English populace believe they are winning convincingly the Hundred Years War, when in fact they aren't. Edward did pretty much stifle any type of rebellion with his heavy hand and some of his loyal nobles. There didn't seem to be any noble that deemed it worth the risk to challenge Edward -he is just too powerful. He does come off as tyrant to a large extent and I could easily imagine lots of injustice. It is just a brutal age and Edward is willing to prove he is a man of his times.He had loads of children and grandchildren all with bloodlines to the throne and this situation would later be one of the main causes for the Wars of the Roses, which some view as "Succession Wars" butt some see as Civil Wars. He lived well into his sixties and reigned England foe close to fifty years.


George III: America's Last King (The English Monarchs Series)
George III: America's Last King (The English Monarchs Series)
Price: $13.20

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not an Enlightened Despot but probably somewhat a despot!, April 18, 2015
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This person is definitely not a "nice guy"!-He is a remnant of the old European oligarchies and he is proud of his role.-He was hesitant to outlaw the slave trade in 1808 because of the profits reaped by British merchants-He was among the first to want to rapidly and totally end the rebellion in the American colonies-and it wouldn't be difficult to imagine him financing some Indian raiding parties on the frontier-His "madness" that went from 1788-89 and is the subject of some frolicsome plays etc., I didn't find so much amusing because of his coldness toward others in so many other instances. He seems like he had a big grudge against Catholicism and he was solely interested in promoting the Anglican church but he did have rational limits there because he doesn't seem to get bogged down in dogmas but is more practical. He ruled about 50 years from the end of the FIW to the end of the War of 1812 but his last 10 years he was mainly debilitated from a return of the "madness".
His other titles included Elector of Hanover and King of France although the latter was finally dropped. He was probably chosen from the European royalty for his continental affiliations to German lands and the fact that he could recruit loads of German mercenaries who according to the book often were not paid. The other reason for the German connections is the fact that these areas were primarily Protestant and not in league with Catholic and later revolutionary France. George had no empathy with the freedoms hoped for in the French Revolution and spent lots of time and money helping to defeat Revolutionary France. He liked to let the British capitalist type naval merchants have a lot of power and he used the Royal Navy to back them up the world over from Russia to India.
He did have a very large family though and his wife Queen Charlotte pretty much stayed with him. He didn't seek out mistresses like many of the British Kings. He doesn't really seem much like a leader but knew his role in the traditional British Monarchy decline in influence, but he still sought to always better his position if he could. He comes off as more a mediocre type king crawling through the age.


Edward the Confessor (English Monarchs)
Edward the Confessor (English Monarchs)
by Frank Barlow
Edition: Paperback
Price: $30.00
42 used & new from $9.26

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An old Viking style King with a gentle streak!, March 20, 2015
The pivotal king of Britain just before the Norman Invasion, he has the distinction of being caught between two very ambitious warlords, William the Bastard and Harold Godwin. It seems What is called England today was being pulled in two major directions, one-the old Viking kingdoms of the north from which Harold seems more at home with, and from due east of the British lands, the main European continent where William is more comfortable. It seems like William and his alliances had an advantage here being much closer to England right across the channel, while the Godwin's alliances were more scattered to the Northern areas like Denmark,etc.
Edward the Confessor seems like an "old school" ruler in that he realizes the limitations of his rule and doesn't really wish to expand but to maintain and govern his finite lands and estates in England. He is a strong king in this respect, Although he seems deeply religious he is not a saint as he is sometimes portrayed, he rules with a firm hand and one could easily imagine him stepping on some toes (or maybe chopping them as well.) He carries the "mystique" aura about him because he supposedly never had any children(or none that could be positively proved to be his offspring.) In this book I visualize him as an old Viking style converted Christian king but no so religious as to seem impractical.
The book devotes a lot of space to his wife Edith who is a close relative of the Godwin's and to Edwards balancing act to keep the Godwin family from taking over and Edward relegated to ruling only in name. Edward does seem a strong king however although his view of "kingship" is rather limited, that is administering to the best of his ability the spaces he is in charge of.
The squabble over who should inherit the throne after Edward is covered pretty good as well. The best quote that I ever heard in regard to whom Edward believed should be his successor is totally in keeping with the character of Ed ward represented in this book. Edward quotes,"The Strongest"!(which proved later to be William the Conqueror!.)


Edward II (The English Monarchs Series)
Edward II (The English Monarchs Series)
by J. R. S. Phillips
Edition: Paperback
Price: $35.00
35 used & new from $18.97

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Will never be "canonized" for sure!, February 18, 2015
The author seemed to say that although Edward II is perceived as a lesser abled king, the fact is that there was just too much competition for the throne among highly qualified and aggressive nobles who also had the bloodlines and the influence, both on the island and on the European mainland, for Edward to emerge in any significant amount of glory. His whole reign seems to be racked by civil wars as numerous nobles challenged his position and status, and like his father Edward I, any victory he achieves seems to get reversed sooner or later by nobles he believed he had conquered once and for all.
The first part of the book focused on Edward's relationship with Gaveston, a noble who seemed to shadow Edward through a large part of his life, much to the dissatisfaction of many of the nobles who also coveted the throne. The author explores a possible homosexual relationship between the two and admits after careful research he came up with little to nothing in this regard, suggesting that the accusations may have been put forward by any number of nobles who were anxious to have Edward discredited. There does seem to be a lot of bickering back and forth with King Edward trying to consolidate power and the nobles trying to increase their power through use of the Magna Carta and the Ordinances-the main issue being taxation and being deprived of ANY property or privilege without a due process. Indeed Edward does use his crown at times to collapse a noble's ambitions and likewise toward the end of the book Edward finds out only too well that these same nobles will use the same arbitrary rules when they perceive the king in a vulnerable position.
Scotland still maintains it's Independence and despite a few attempts to reign it in by King Edward(which miserably fail), the Scots are not intimidated at all by Edward. On the continent Edward's claims to parts of Europe are also hotly contested by noble families already in possession of large area. So Edward is swimming in a sea of struggling nobles no matter where he turns. To make matters worse for himself he is perceived by his competitors as not "being his own man", and always being under the influence of a noble who gives him bad counsel and service. In addition it is pointed out in the book that Edward seems to have a "cruel streak" as did his father and this finally comes back to haunt him at the end. The last part of the book the author spends investigating the claims as to whether Edward was murdered or not. The book is thick but broken into well organized chapters and subtopics


Archaeological History of the Hocking Valley
Archaeological History of the Hocking Valley
by James L. Murphy
Edition: Paperback
16 used & new from $19.95

5.0 out of 5 stars Trying to bring some light into an unknown area of archaeology., January 26, 2015
This book presents more questions than answers in regard to Native American prehistory in this area, that is the Hocking Valley. One of the main reasons is because there is a lack of prehistoric sites and the ones that have been located seem to be in areas where there was a lot of Western European settlement and the Hocking Valley is also subject to flooding and does not have the large access to agricultural plains that is found in other areas of the state of Ohio. The Hocking Valley is part of the far western Appalachian foothills with the Hocking River and its tributaries coursing through it.
In one area specifically however there is some agricultural area of a significant size and here is found a lot of earthworks of the Adena Interaction phase of the Middle Woodlands Indian Culture. The author actually says that it can be theorized that this area may have been a "capital" of this Adena culture due to the number of profound mounds and earthworks located at the town of Plains, Ohio near the town of Athens. The Hocking Valley contains almost no Hopewell earthworks except the ones near Lancaster Ohio near the origin of the Hocking River, however these earthworks are in such poor condition that they are almost undiscernable. In the Adena earthworks and mounds are found some ceremonial type artifacts but nothing anywhere near the profundity of objects found in the Hopewell areas to the west of the Plains.There are some burials in the mounds and I believe there may have been evidence of some type of trophy skull which is sometimes found in both Adena and Hopewell mounds.
The author speculates that the Hocking Valley and its tributary river and creek drainage system that empties into the Ohio river at Hockingport, Ohio may have been some type of "buffer zone" between different Indian groups inhabiting the areas. The fact seems to be that there have been very few prehistoric sites from the Paleo-to the Archaic right on into the historic period to investigate and the ones found are often in poor condition. There were two chapters on purported Fort Ancient villages(approx.1450's AD) but the finds were very sparse due to modern "progress", shopping malls, housing, etc. The book does have really great descriptions of the sites that they have found however and lots of photos and diagrams. The areas appeared to be just not suitable for the type of early agriculture required or as the author suggests it may have been used as a "hunting preserve" and/or "buffer zone" between the Native American family/clan/cults inhabiting the area. Or at least that's what I gathered from the read.


The Buffalo Site : a late 17th century Indian village site (46 Pu 31) in Putnam County, West Virginia
The Buffalo Site : a late 17th century Indian village site (46 Pu 31) in Putnam County, West Virginia
by Lee H. Hanson
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Lots of photos and graphs-an archaeological perspective on the Buffalo site, January 24, 2015
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The author brings into question whether the "Fort Ancient Culture" is actually a type of "culture" or in reality just another local episode of the Late Woodland Prehistoric Period. The shell mask on the cover seems to be the one object among the archaeological finds that seem to be unique to the "Fort Ancient" culture and these masks and masquettes, which the author believe reflect a Tennessee Mountain contact area, are in fact very rare and usually only found in "Fort Ancient" sites in the Eastern and Southeastern areas of the proposed Fort Ancient influence area. Other than some pottery which is also unique but rare and a very few limestone lined graves actually most of the archaeological items found in the digs are common to almost all of the Late Woodland Indian Period archaeological sites in New York, Pennsylvania, Northern Ohio, and southern areas such as Tennessee etc. I felt the authors point was that although there are some differences between these "cultures", the differences are really not that great that would necessarily mark a distinctly different culture from other Late Woodland Sites.


Queen Anne
Queen Anne
by David GREEN
Edition: Hardcover
12 used & new from $4.46

5.0 out of 5 stars Marks a point where the Monarchy is becoming trivialized by the new rise of the middle classes., January 16, 2015
This review is from: Queen Anne (Hardcover)
This book is not part of the English Monarch's series-it focus's a great deal on Anne's personal life, particularly her up and down relationship with Sarah the wife of the duke of Marlborough-The Duke of Marlborough was Churchill, one of Anne's warlords in the European theater.Marlborough seemed to have maybe too much influence over Queen Anne and the queen seemed like she was eclipsed. She doesn't appear from this work to have been a very strong monarch and you can see more and more the role of the royalty is being pushed into the background and replaced with strong administrators and business people.
The author has another bio in regard to this period called Sarah, The Duchess of Marlborough and it appears he used a lot of the same sources from this book in the Queen Anne book, mainly the journal of the Duchess of Marlborough. Anne suffered from poor health her entire reign and had numerous miscarriages and was not able to produce heir to the throne. Her father was James II, of the "Glorious Revolution", meaning he abdicated the throne without being forced to.Her sister Mary of William and Mary inherited the English throne after the abdication of James II and Anne being Mary's sister inherited the throne after Mary died early in her reign. The author downplays the European warfare aspect of the Battle of Blenheim(1704) and the Wars of the Spanish Succession, and suggests that diplomacy later undid all of the advantages that the English government gained from the conflicts.Also during Anne's reign there is increased interest and conflict in the colonial ventures of England,once again the new business entrepreneurs seem to guide the helm with Queen Mary pushed into the background.


Edward I (The English Monarchs Series)
Edward I (The English Monarchs Series)
by Michael Prestwich
Edition: Paperback
Price: $38.50
65 used & new from $2.34

5.0 out of 5 stars Power to tax is the power to destroy(or to rule and survive!), December 29, 2014
I was wondering about the picture of supposedly Edward on the cover where he had a decaying nose and expected an explanation of it but was disappointed, because I presumed he must have had leprosy from the painting-toward the end though it explained where his coffin had been opened at least once and the painting may have come from one of the "other" openings not mentioned. anyways he does seem to have been a very powerful king who spoke in Norman and saw his domains as encompassing the European mainlands as well as England. Early in his kingship he completely subdued Wales and then turned to Scotland. Scotland was a big problem for him apparently because it was an ally of France so he was determined to bring the Scots into his influence.
He was a direct descendant of the Plantangenet's so he inherited a good ruling base to tax his subjects and found all kinds of devious and unique ways to keep his coffers filled including large loans from Italian Banking houses that I wasn't able to discover if he ever really paid them back or not. He seems to have been just but as any rulership there appeared to be a lot of loopholes for the wealthy subjects and not much besides an occasional "private grievance session with the king" for poor subjects that didn't seem like it would address much at all. He was continually throughout the book at conflict with his nobles whom he saw at numerous times as wanting to overthrow him. He could be very deadly when riled and was not above inflicting "cruel and unusual" punishment on "perceived," disobedient subjects. He tried to keep the Catholic Church and the influence of "popery" to a minimum and also used them as a tax base. The book was very scholarly done as are the other books in the English Monarch series!


The Shoshoni-Crow Sun Dance (Civilization of the American Indian)
The Shoshoni-Crow Sun Dance (Civilization of the American Indian)
by Fred W. Voget
Edition: Hardcover
33 used & new from $4.83

5.0 out of 5 stars Some really graphic descriptions!, December 12, 2014
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This book seems to have been removed from a lot of public libraries and I can't see why-it really gives some good descriptions of the numerous ways the sundance was and is used. Anything from revenge, to obtaining a mate, etc. the really important things in life must be purchased with supreme suffering-all of the major religions believe this and the Sundance is one of the most painful,exhausting rituals. I wondered how old it actually is? When I see some archaeological digs and they find what they believe to be a prehistoric Native American house I now think-"I wonder if it's a Sweat Lodge or some posts from a sundance?


Sacred Pain: Hurting the Body for the Sake of the Soul
Sacred Pain: Hurting the Body for the Sake of the Soul
by Ariel Glucklich
Edition: Hardcover
32 used & new from $10.94

5.0 out of 5 stars This book will take you a while-even though 200 pages you won't do it in a night or even a week !, December 12, 2014
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I just ordered the End Of Magic his other book after reading this one-The author deals with the psychological, social aspects of what pain is in regard to the religious experience and I get the feeling that being in touch with the Creator might not be in the formula at least in the way we traditionally see it. He really has an analytical mind and carefully dissects everything to the point where at times I was just seeing some of this pain in regard to religious experiences as a "rite of passage" or a "quality control" type of initiation thing for societies. The book goes from self inflicted type pain and offers interpretations for the phenomena and proceeds to anaesthesia where there is an attempt to completely block pain.

The purpose being to gain approval or respectability of peers. So nonetheless the "pain"experience is as important as if there is maybe a god who sees and approves! I always thought of an old quote while reading this book, "A heightened religious experience may not necessarily put one in contact with the creator but it can raise the bar to where one definitely believes that he or she is in contact." Ihad to go back and completely reread paragraphs because I wasn't sure at times what I had read, but I think I sorta got the point! Anyways this book is worth the struggle and as I read it I found myself paging to the picture of the author thinking, "This looks like the kinda guy that could write a book like this, probably even was in a Sundance himself, analyzed it and now sandbagging it!


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