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Rune Rindel Hansen RSS Feed (Copenhagen, Denmark)
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Rebel for the Hell of It: The Life of Tupac Shakur
Rebel for the Hell of It: The Life of Tupac Shakur
by Armond White
Edition: Paperback
Price: $15.30
63 used & new from $0.01

0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A disappointed black activist, June 7, 2010
Even though Armond White writes in English, somehow I don't really understand his writing, it's like he is communicating in a way I simply don't get. Anyway it seems like there is two things on Armond Whites mind, he wants to glorify black people and he sees the hardships black people experience in the US today as a result of white suppression and racism. The golden age for Armond White is the Black Panther activism of the 60's. In this book he tries to place Tupac's gangsta rap into the Black Panther tradition, but must acknowledge that it is impossible. It's quite suprising that Armond White seems to get pissed by the fact that Tupac scores a megahit with 'California Love' in the mid 90's, instead, one senses, Armond White is disappointed that Tupac doesn't take up the proud tradition of black activism, but rather indulges in violence and commercial success.


De unge år [Region 2]
De unge år [Region 2]

3.0 out of 5 stars In-joke for The National Film School of Denmark, June 1, 2010
This review is from: De unge år [Region 2] (DVD)
There is something absurd about this production. It describes the early years of Danish director Lars von Trier. The absurd thing, is that Lars von Trier, being a very elitarian film maker, his early years are here described in the form of popular comedy. It's amazing that this film has managed to move into production because it so utterly falls between two stools! What audience is this film supposed to cater for? The intellectual milieu which is the audience to von Triers film will be bored with the form of this folksy popular comedy. And the broad mainstream audience will fail to grasp it's art related points. It seems to me that the only audience which will appriciate the film is the people who was in the milieu around The National Film School of Denmark when Lars von Trier studied there, and thus it's just very private in-joke. The film often tries to funny, maybe I am hard to make laugh, but I must admit that I didn't laugh much.


The Wisdom of Crowds
The Wisdom of Crowds
by James Surowiecki
Edition: Paperback
Price: $8.96
385 used & new from $0.01

0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Another clever dick from Wall Street?, May 31, 2010
This review is from: The Wisdom of Crowds (Paperback)
This book has some intersting points. For example then it recounts an example which tells that a crowd of laymens collective assesments of the weight of an ox at a county fair is actually more accurate than the experts assesment. And thus Surowiecki means to tell that a crowd of independent people are actually more smart than an expert. The text of the book is around 270 pages, but in my opinion Surowiecki stops being interesting already around page 60. The rest of the book seems to be material he has just amassed because he had to fill out the pages of the book. Yeah actually he could have made a much thiner pamphlet to get his message across! And also the message that crowds can be intelligent, is that something new? After all a substantial part of the evolution of human culture and knowhow is a result of the wisdom of crowds - isn't it? So one get this sneaking feeling that James Surowiecki is yet another of these clever dicks from Wall Street, trying to give foolish people the impression that he has found the key to how they really can start to make money in big scale.


Song of Solomon
Song of Solomon
by Toni Morrison
Edition: Paperback
Price: $14.33
388 used & new from $1.63

0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Toni Morrison is like an animal, May 31, 2010
This review is from: Song of Solomon (Paperback)
This book from Toni Morrison is not too bad, it's actually OK. What I like about Toni Morrison is that she is a no-nonsense writer. She perceives the world in an animal like way. She has a total natural acceptance of the bodily processes of being human, white people often have a much more schizophrenic relation to their bodily processes, where they feel ashamed and they are not natural with their body in the same way that Toni Morrisons characters are. Reading Toni Morrisons book one gets a sense that violence is an integrated trait of Afro American culture, virtually all her characters are violent and it seems like violence is an accepted way to solve problems instead of talking about them. In Toni Morrisons universe the shadow of slavery still exists, the characters have relatives which have been killed by white people in racist attacks down south.


Ringworld (A Del Rey book)
Ringworld (A Del Rey book)
by Larry Niven
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: $7.19
165 used & new from $0.01

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Vivid Imagination, May 25, 2010
Larry Niven is not that good a writer, but its anyway slightly fascinating to read about his sci-fi universe. In this book we visit the Ringworld, it's a massive artificial construction meant to support life in space. It's shaped like a massive ring around a star, this ring has got kind of the size that a planet would traverse in an orbit, so it's very big! In Niven's universe humans are just one part of the intelligent species in the universe, other species are pupeteers (a specie superior to humans in intelligence) and kzins (an animal like species, inferior to humans). The most interesting thing of the novel is that it proposes that luck is a genetic property, quite interesting.


Goddag Maelkevej
Goddag Maelkevej
by Leif Ahm
Edition: Hardcover

1.0 out of 5 stars A very thin cup of tea!, May 20, 2010
This review is from: Goddag Maelkevej (Hardcover)
I had to discipline myself to read through this book, it was not exactly painful but quite boring. I am the kind of person who always finnish reading a book I have started on. I wonder why? Anyway this book is written in the early 60's. A time when the greatest curse in second half 20.th century litterature arose. That is magical realism! So the book is about a young man and wimen. The book changes between passages which are described realistically, they are just ordinary scenes from his life, like riding the train, going to an examination at the highschool, meeting a girl at a bar, etc. Interspersed in this plain reality is then magical realism scenes, for example the young man is sailing in a boat on a lake, then he jumps into the water and it turns out to be milk. His girlfriend becomes a moviestar, he meets the president of the milkyway and so on. The book is poetic in nature, it has some beauty, lightness and innocense about it. It's written in a time, 1962, when everything was breaking up in northern Europe, the youth revolt was soon to sweep the western world. So in the young litterature at the time they wanted to do something new, so it became fashion to blow out some magical realism, trying to sophisticate their stale accounts. Also the book desribes sex, masturbation and even a visit to the toilet, things which must have appeared a little chocking to the elder generation at the time. But it is not a good read, it seems like the book is lacking a spine, a plot.


ASP.NET MVC Framework Unleashed
ASP.NET MVC Framework Unleashed
by Stephen Walther
Edition: Paperback
Price: $45.09
38 used & new from $8.91

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars OK intro to ASP.NET MVC, May 19, 2010
This is an OK ASP.NET MVC book. The structure of the book is that first Stephen describes various features of the ASP.NET MVC framework with shorter code examples and then in the later 6 chapters of the book we are building a larger blog application. I think the idea of first decribing the ASP.NET MVC features in shorter code examples and then later employing them in a larger app is good. It makes it easier to understand. All the way through the book Stephen is consistently testing his code with Visual Studio Unit Testing, so it's cool that you also get an introduction to this practice. When we are building the blog app in the second part of the book, Stephen is practicing Test Driven Development. Her start each chapter with some user stories (Use cases) which he wants to implement. The initial tests he then also generates from the user stories. So it's also cool to get an introduction to TDD. Stephen is an OK teacher. I think it's cool how he ties use cases, to tests to coding. The picture Stephen is painting is simple and clear. One drawback to the book is that Stephen is using some projects (RouteDebugger and MvcFakes) for test and debugging, which he don't explain the code of. It maybe falls outside the scope of the book, but I think I would have liked to understand how the codes of these projects worked. The book is a rather quick and light read. If you pick this book up to get introduced to the ASP.NET MVC framework you will be OK.


Zorba the Greek
Zorba the Greek
by Nikos Kazantzakis
Edition: Paperback
189 used & new from $0.01

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Undisturbed humanity, May 17, 2010
This review is from: Zorba the Greek (Paperback)
This is a nice book. It decribes the adventures of the narrator (an intellectual) and Zorbas who is an utterly uneintellectual man, apparently original a Macedonian, Zorbas background is very modest, somewhat working class or peasant. Zorbas is a quite fascinating figure and becomes quite much alive. Zorbas has travelled around the Balkans living from day to day, from the hand to the mouth. He has seen many things, (and in the Balkans around the beginning of the 20th century - there was also bad things to see!) so Zorbas very well knows that life is not perfect. Yet a cardinal trait of Zorbas character is that he seems to rest in life and apparently he finds it worthwile. Zorbas seemingly is "home" in life. There execudes from the novel a Joie de vivre, it's like the characters often simply are in a state where life is ok. There is a feeling in the novel which reminded me a bit about the novel "Mister God, This Is Anna" by Fynn (Sydney Hopkins). It's this thing about that despite life is terrible imperfect then you can live in a place where you are "home" and it's ok.
Zorba the Greek also offers a substantial critique on religion, which are impersonated by various monks and church people which Zorba and the narrator encounters. Zorba breathes life. Zorba is by no means a saint, he is also quite imperfect himself and a bit of a devil sometimes.


The Bookseller of Kabul
The Bookseller of Kabul
by Åsne Seierstad
Edition: Paperback
Price: $11.74
588 used & new from $0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars Very good introduction to middle class moslem culture in Kabul, Afghanistan, May 14, 2010
It's a quite impressive book that Åsne Seierstad has managed to produce. The story behind the book is that Åsne Seierstad entered Kabul together with the Northern Alliance (Various Afghan troops and military groups who was fighting Taliban) two weeks after 9/11. In Kabul she met the bookseller and lived for some months with his family. She has transformed interviews with the family and her own experiences into the fictional account which the book is. The book is lovely political incorrect and it's my sense that it gives a quite truthful picture of middleclass moslem life in Kabul. The central character of the book is the bookseller Sultan Khan, he is an entrepreneuristic individual and runs several bookshops around Kabul. Khan is described as a quite liberal man, but still he is to a significant extend still a traditional Afghan man. For example during the account he takes a 2. wife, I think she is around 16 and he is 40 something. In his house he is the supreme lord, his word is law. Still Sultan give me a sympathetic impression, and I definitely think that a developing Afghanistan could be build upon individuals like Sultan. The book provides a whole host of insights into Afghan middleclass culture, which I before was absolutely ignorant about. A thread running through the book, one feels, is the authors resentment to the very substantial supression of women, which is cardinal trait of Afghan culture.


Almayer's Folly: A Story of an Eastern River
Almayer's Folly: A Story of an Eastern River
by Joseph Conrad
Edition: Paperback
Price: $6.95
15 used & new from $2.50

1 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing start from Conrad, May 11, 2010
This is Joseph Conrads first novel. It deals with the conflicts between native people (Malayans) and Dutch tradesmen in the jungle of Borneo. It has some brilliant passages, but all in all it's a quite dull read.


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