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Muzina
Muzina
Price: $15.99
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars African Music and Singing, of Excellence, October 4, 2002
This review is from: Muzina (Audio CD)
What stands out with absolute clarity is the strength, beauty, smoothness and dedication of both Tabu Ley and other lead vocalists, as well as the background ones. Tabu Ley indeed loves what he is doing and gives the audience much, much more than they bargained for. The music is gentle and soothing, as it is executed excellently with great timing and African language (although Tabu Ley will time and again throw in some English and African phrases and words). Muzina's beat is gentle compared to
the hits in Tabu Ley's excellent "Africa Worldwide" album; such
that Muzina is great to listen to, either in an atmosphere of relaxation or jubilation. If you are a fan of African song and music, you need not hesitate to add this to your collection.


Burnin'
Burnin'
Price: $10.99
75 used & new from $3.37

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Revolutionary & Spiritual Lyrics by Excellent United Wailers, September 9, 2002
This review is from: Burnin' (Audio CD)
The songs "Reincarnated Souls," (Bunny Wailer) "No Sympathy" (Peter Tosh) and "The Oppressed Song" (Bunny Wailer) are the major additions to the earlier collection, and these three simply reinforce this "Burnin" album as the Wailers' best kept secret of excellence! This is the first time I ever hear these three grest additions! What else is still hidden in the Wailers' closets? :-). The whole collection mainly involves songs of revolution and of spiritualism e.g., "Burnin' and Looting " "Reincarnated Souls" and "Small Axe." Some of the
tunes are simply soothing, and of note here is "Hallelujah
Time" "Reincarnated Souls" and "The Oppressed Song" (in the
sweet voice of Bunny Wailer (Neville Livingstone--which voice
has been praised by countless others) and "Rasta Man Chant" which is a song-beat by the Wailers as a group. In "No Sympathy"
Peter Tosh sweetly voices his elusive search for peace, love, rest, happiness, and advice from friends in an excellent
beautiful song. But he still nurses hope. Given the excellence
of this collection, including the music and the lyrics, and given that it was quite a united effort by a Beatles status black African group that was later to break up or take on solo careers, this album takes the status of a collectible whose value will continue to grow with time. Two frequently mentioned titles on this album are "I Shot the Sheriff" and "Get Up, Stand Up." I have tended to compare the Burnin' album to the "Catch a
Fire" album (another excellent effort by the original Wailers that included Neville "Bunny Wailer" Livingston and Peter Tosh who together with Bob became more famous than the others of the group) and the "Natty Dread" album. These are all albums I will always cherish, and they are all representative of the Wailers' music tradition.


Rock To The Rock: The Complete Bob Marley & The Wailers 1967-1972, Vol.1
Rock To The Rock: The Complete Bob Marley & The Wailers 1967-1972, Vol.1
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Exceptional Mellow Mood Mix by Bob Marley and the Wailers, September 9, 2002
The impression gathered from listening to this collection is that Marley was powerful, creative, and excellent throughout his music career. In this collection is Marley singing and playing with the Wailers, while in his early 20's, this revealing his strong and smooth youthful voice. The mix reveals a minimally remastered collection, some dubbing, in which the Wailers output is clear and strong. Unforgettable hits like "The World is Changing" and "Treat You Right," both sang by Jimmy Norman and "Love" sang by Peter Tosh are rare or absent in other Wailers' collection. No one would ever forget the smooth background/ backup voice of Rita Marley on many of the hits. It is important that this "Rock to Rock" collection involves the
input of the Wailers when they were still largely united, and they churn out soothing hits like "Nice Time," "Mellow Mood," "There She Goes," "How Many Times?," and "Soul Rebel" (original). It is also important that this collection, put out in 1997, contains hits like "Rock to Rock," "Rocking Steady," "Love," "Nice Time," and "What Goes Around, Comes Around" which had not been previously released. All in all, this is a unique and remarkable collection that may not have the exposure it deserves since it contains earlier hits; but one which every Marley fan would be proud to listen to and own.


Survival
Survival
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lyrics of Exploitation, Struggle, Survival, and Freedom, August 26, 2001
This review is from: Survival (Audio CD)
More than any other collection, this one thoroughly dramatises, in beautiful song and beat, Marley as the revolutionary so cognizant of the colonial/ neocolonial mainstream system that has strived to maintain blacks and other poor and downtrodden in continuous ignorance, poverty, misery, and exploitation. The songs are of remarkable content in which Marley describes the system and how the exploited are responding to or should respond to it so as to crush it. Any music lover inclined to issues of world exploitation and freedom would greatly be intrigued and would cherish having this collection, as will be demonstrated by my comments on each of the songs. "Africa Unite" involves the urging of African countries and ethnic groups to unite, which effort would vastly benefit blacks everywhere, including black children now and in the future. Marley sings, "How good and pleasant it would be...to see the unification of all Africans." Of merit to Marley, everyone that is black or of African descent is African. African unity then becomes of benefit to diasporan blacks or Africans. In "One Drop," Marley decries the mainstream system's exploitative stance that has resulted in blacks having to keep on fighting for freedom; and also having to die and starve in vast numbers as they lament their situation, in their bid to survive. In "Ride Natty Ride," the poor and downtrodden are shown to have the endless fire burning within them, which involves the determined struggle to survive and overcome exploitation. In "Ambush in the Night," Marley decries the exploitative mainstream for belittling blacks, calling them ignorant, and as only knowing what was taught them by colonialists/ neocolonialists. Mainstream is fully focused on frustrating the Africans' struggling to get out of poverty and exploitation; Africans struggle against this system. The poor and downtrodden find themselves being continuously "ambushed." In "Wake Up and Live," the exploited are urged to wake up to the injustices inflicted on them, and into struggling to overcome these evils. In "So Much Trouble in the World," Marley sings that "What goes on up is coming on down" and "What goes around, comes around," implying that the mainstream exploitative mechanism, that creates trouble and chaos in the world, will eventually collapse as it becomes the victim of its own exploiting and evil ways. The song "Zimbabwe" was sang shortly before white-controlled Zimbabwe (Rhodesia) achieved independence. The song is about the achievement of the liberation (independence) of Zimbabwe having to require Africans continuing to fight for their rights against a colonialist divide-and-rule system that has tricked and torn Africans apart.Africans are tied in a system in which they cannot decide their destiny in a free and fair way. A revolutionary approach to overthrowing this system would be required. In the song "Top Rankin," Marley sings that the neocolonial system does not want Africans to unite, and live together. The system instead entices Africans to instead "keep on fussing and fighting" and "killing one another" to the uppermost (Top Rankin'). The system strives to keep Africans in poverty Marley sings that he feels brotherly/ sisterly love for those struggling against the yoke of poverty and exploitation. Despite the odds, blacks and other downtrodden ones have adamantly refused to let the neocolonial system keep them down and exploited, forever.Marley asserts that since they are deprived of "equal opportunity," Africans look forward to freedom and liberty. Marley also calls forth for revenge on the mainstream mechanism which continues to be "deceptive" as it goes on building churches and universities. Marley urges the exploiting system to tell the people the truth about their evil ways. Marley sings that "We have been trampled on for so long." In the song "Survival," Marley sings that the mainstream mechanism cannot claim to care for blacks who are "Suffering in every way," as they struggle to "survive" and be "survivors."


Ebisoko n'engero: Ez'amakulu amakusike
Ebisoko n'engero: Ez'amakulu amakusike
by J. C. Ssekamwa
Edition: Unknown Binding

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Idioms and Folk Tales that Hold Concealed Significance, March 4, 2001
Written in the African Luganda language, this book is excellently arranged in teaching format to benefit instructors, students, and the general public. The book presents Ganda proverbs as intertwined with folk tales, idioms, and riddles. The folk tales take up about half the book, the other half devoted to interpreting the proverbs, idioms, and riddles in the folk tales. This enriches the reader's perspective on the proverbs and other aspects of the Luganda language. It is to be remembered that many Luganda proverbs are rooted in folk tales, and many contain riddle and idiom aspects. The author uses a lot of italics and numbering to highlight and interpret the salient aspects of the language, including the proverbs. He also adds a lot of Luganda language forms that have emerged in this era. But because he deals with each folk tale and its constituents separately, it is common for the frequently used proverbs and other forms to be interpreted many times. And since the book does not exclusively deal with proverbs, the reader will not find most of the Ganda proverbs here. Ssekamwa's introduction is rich insofar as he devotes a lot to defining Luganda idioms, idioms, and riddles. This is important since some Luganda proverbs are either mistaken for, or can be in idiom or riddle form. Some of the folk tales in this book are translated ones of Greeks and Romans, with many Ganda forms applied.


Names from East Africa
Names from East Africa
by Harry McKinzie
Edition: Paperback
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "Names from East Africa": A Review, February 22, 2001
This review is from: Names from East Africa (Paperback)
This booklet is not that many pages long. It mainly contains personal name definitions of people of Uganda, Rwanda, Kenya, and Congo (Zaire)...which are part of the area known as the "African Great Lakes Region." Some of the name interpretations are lengthy and commendable, while others are quite short. Written in the late 1970's, the book still stands out as one of the first book efforts on East African names. Since then many more books, many of them much larger, have been written on African names as the research and interest grows.


What's in a name?: A study of Shona nomenclature
What's in a name?: A study of Shona nomenclature
by Alec J. C. Pongweni
Edition: Unknown Binding
2 used & new from $60.00

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Very Excellent Book on African Shona Personal Names, February 21, 2001
This is an excellent work laden with varied and thorough explanatory detail on the names that are interpreted. The author, Alec Pongweni, combines literature, linguistics, culture, history, revolution, and politics as background in interpreting the names. This is a small but one of the best written books on African names, in part given that Pongweni is a renowned writer of immense expertise. Pongweni is a splendidly dedicated and detailed writer, a translator of immense expertise, a master at both the African and Shakespearean languagees, and to whom is owed tremendous gratitude. Pongweni tells so much, so much beyond names, in a small and compact book.


Luganda English Dictionary
Luganda English Dictionary
by John D. Murphy
Edition: Hardcover
9 used & new from $150.00

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Luganda Words and Literature Translated into English, February 17, 2001
This is a heavy volume of hundreds of pages, in small print, that is well worth the price. This remains the best Luganda-English translation book, and not much in terms of such dictionary types has been written since this volume came out in the 1970's. But since language is never static, I would wish that appropriate linguists would endeavor to revise and re-write such works on a continuous basis. Indeed, despite the length and breadth of this translation dictionary, there are still many Luganda words that remain missing. This dictionary remains a very important tool, insofar as many idioms, proverbs, personal and place names, and other literary or cultural expressions are referred to. These make the meanings of the words clearer. They also display that such are a crucial aspect of understanding and appreciating the Luganda language. The Ganda people of Uganda have some of the most impressively wealthy of African literatures. Luganda literature contains thousands of words, proverbs, and idiomatic expressions that one heavily interested in traditional African literature is urged to take a look at.


Luganda proverbs (Beitrage zur Kulturanthropologie)
Luganda proverbs (Beitrage zur Kulturanthropologie)
by Ferdinand Walser
Edition: Paperback
14 used & new from $101.31

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Interpretations/ Applications on Uganda Proverbs, February 17, 2001
This is a remarkably detailed compilation of close to 5500 proverbs of the Ganda ethnics (Baganda) of Uganda. The proverbs are translated and interpretred along alphabetical sequence, although many of the proverbs are repetitions of others written in a different tense or with different spellings. Ferdinand Walser meticulously employed several published, unpublished and oral sources from English, Dutch, French, German, and Luganda languages. The translations and interpretations are primarily from Luganda to English, but synonymous proverbs in European, as well as as other African languages are brought in now and then. The proverbs are also often made to refer to each other in the cases where they are synonymous, and this also makes their meanings clearer. At a very limited level, Walser mentions some personal names linked to the proverbs. Although the book was published in 1982, most of it was apparently compiled from the 1930's until 1957, after when Walser left the Buganda territory to head for his native Austria. Like many native African writings, Walser found difficulty in getting the work published, and it was not until 1977 that a major grant that would get the book in print was rendered by Missio Catholic missionaries. Although many people thereafter polished up on the book, with the convenience of modern computerized publishing methods, the names of these contributors are unfortunately not mentioned. In the introduction, the editors mention an important aspect of the book (vii): "...the great advantage enjoyed by the author [Walser] who lived with the [indigenous] people for many years when most of the proverbs he collected were still living tradition and not merely consigned to paper. The reader will surely appreciate Walser's method of listening to the people, and to many of them, to learn the real meaning and usages of proverbs." The Ganda people have one of the wealthist traditions and stock of African literature that includes their highly intriguing proverbs of culture and wisdom. Anyone with interest in such aspects is urged to explore this master volume of detail.


Rastaman Vibration
Rastaman Vibration
60 used & new from $0.24

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Most Exciting of Bob Marley's Recorded Albums, January 4, 2001
This review is from: Rastaman Vibration (Audio CD)
An Ethiopian friend of mine rated this as the best of Marley's albums ever. At least I look at this as the most exciting (in terms of music and song) alongside the "Babylon by Bus (Live)" album. Though this "Rastaman Vibration" does not have the sharp political and revolutionary tone of albums like "Catch a Fire," "Natty Dread" and "Burnin," it remains a must have for all Marley fans of excitement. In the past I so much loved the albums "Kaya" and "Survival." so it is just rightful to say that there is really no bad Bob Marley song/ album. Lets take a look at the exciting songs in the album "Rastaman Vibration." The song "Crazy Baldheads" is symbolic of exploitative, scornful persons that are unappreciative of the laboring that blacks have contributed to the building of the Americas. Marley looks forward to people striving to get rid of these exploiting and disdainful persons that appear to be crazy in the way they operate things. The song "Who the Cap Fit" is directive in stating that one is urged to be carefully scrutinizing in choosing friends and in identifying enemies. It is indeed a deceptive world of persons out there. The song "Nightshift" displays the unsavory work hours of exploited laboreres, and this can translate to them working all night long. The famous song "War" which is found on many Marley albums is summed up in the song..."...there will always be war until the philosophy that holds one man superior and another one inferior is finally and permanently discredited and abandoned." The "Rat Race" song symbolizes the continuous struggling of exploitative persons that are striving to live and survive. The "Rastaman Vibration" song calls forth for people to strive to help each other out in life, whenever that becomes necessary. The song "Reggae Music" is in praise of reggae music as composed of "roots, rock, reggae." The tragic song "Johnny" is of a son's life robbed from his crying mother. Johnny is a virtuous, innocent victim of prejudiced police brutality against blacks. "Other exciting songs in this "Rastaman Vibration" are "Cry to Me" and "Want More." You surely should not miss out on listening to this album, more so, if you are a Bob Marley fan.


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