Your Garage Summer Reading Amazon Fashion Learn more nav_sap_plcc_ascpsc $5 Albums Fire TV Stick Subscribe & Save Patriotic Picks Shop-by-Room Amazon Cash Back Offer roadies roadies roadies  Amazon Echo  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Amazon Echo Introducing new colors All-New Kindle Oasis UniOrlando Segway miniPro
Profile for Jessie Strand > Reviews

Browse

Jessie Strand's Profile

Customer Reviews: 9
Top Reviewer Ranking: 3,603,874
Helpful Votes: 22


Community Features
Review Discussion Boards
Top Reviewers

Guidelines: Learn more about the ins and outs of Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Jessie Strand RSS Feed (Brooklyn, NY)

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Potty (Leslie Patricelli board books)
Potty (Leslie Patricelli board books)
by Leslie Patricelli
Edition: Board book
Price: $5.00
305 used & new from $0.01

1.0 out of 5 stars Not what I expected, April 16, 2016
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Not what I expected. I don't care for it and neither do my toddlers. It found it to be dumbed down, even for little ones, and without a coherent story line.


DC SUPER HEROES: MY FIRST BOOK OF GIRL POWER
DC SUPER HEROES: MY FIRST BOOK OF GIRL POWER
by Julie Merberg
Edition: Board book
Price: $5.75
42 used & new from $4.19

5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, April 16, 2016
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This book is great for young girls. It promotes compassion, confidence, and bravery. It is never too young to start instilling these values.


The Way I Feel
The Way I Feel
by Janan Cain
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $11.11
106 used & new from $1.24

5.0 out of 5 stars My 2 year olds love it!, April 16, 2016
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The Way I Feel (Hardcover)
Excellent book. My 2 year old twins girls love it. The illustrations are beautiful & make the content palpable.


The Freud Reader
The Freud Reader
by Peter Gay
Edition: Paperback
Price: $14.32
178 used & new from $3.48

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential Reading, May 2, 2013
This review is from: The Freud Reader (Paperback)
Peter Gay provides an excellent compendium of Freud's philosophical, psychological, and political works. The Freud Reader begins with a biographical overview and is arranged chronologically, illustrating Freud's evolvement from a topographic theory of mind to a structural theory of drives. What I find most valuable about this book is that it contextualizes the advent of psychoanalysis, and its many implications, including insight into what is lacking in our current perception of mental health.

A model of mind, once providing a theoretical schema for implementing psychological treatment is now often neglected, in favor of seemingly quantifiable, albeit reductionistic, treatment methodologies. These evidenced based approaches which appeal to contemporary scientific thought are often disproportionally emphasized by educators and treatment providers. While highly beneficial to many, the consequence of relying solely on measurable techniques is the oversimplification of the human experience. By ignoring unconscious processes and viewing patients primarily in terms of antecedents, behaviors, and consequences, the illusion that "problems" have been solved often perpetuates while they resurface in a different guise. Ignorance can be bliss, but people continue suffering as a result. They are likelier to be sold short of attaining a higher level of awareness needed to make sense of their inner worlds.

Since at this point in time the mind cannot, I don't think, be quantified, a paradigm shift needs to occur in order for a more balanced treatment approach to achieve scientific credibility. Ideally, I believe, this could be attained by incorporating aspects of philosophy, psychology, neurology, and physics to develop a theory of mind, laying the groundwork for future treatment interventions. Through its organization and wide range of writing selections, The Freud Reader provides a piece of the foundation necessary to revolutionize our conceptualization of mental health, by leaving room for examination of how it runs in conjunction with scientific and societal changes.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 11, 2013 12:15 PM PDT


Allowing Magnificence: Living the Expanded Version of Your Life
Allowing Magnificence: Living the Expanded Version of Your Life
by Susan Winter
Edition: Paperback
Price: $8.61
24 used & new from $6.68

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Discover Your Higher Purpose, April 28, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Allowing Magnificence provides a strong framework for understanding our existence. Many of us live our lives in a mode of reactivity. Disregarding our true needs, our responses to the outside world are often futile attempts to control it. Susan Winter illustrates how for many of us, living life passively (i.e., reactively) is done instinctively, to survive in a society of imposed norms. Consequently, we have lost sight of our essence. Attempts to manipulate assiduous externals distract us from recognizing the gifts hidden in our suffering. These gifts are the means to discovering our higher purpose.

Having met Susan while in my mid-20's, she played a pivotal role in my transformed perception of reality. While reading Allowing Magnificence I realized that much of my work, as a psychotherapist, has been shaped by ideas cultivated from her guidance. As depicted in the book, we often view tragedy as happening TO us. To make sense of and learn from our suffering, to achieve our higher purpose, can be empowering and life altering. Allowing Magnificence provides readers with the tools to discover the path to living a meaningful and fulfilling existence.


The Narcissism Epidemic: Living in the Age of Entitlement
The Narcissism Epidemic: Living in the Age of Entitlement
by Jean M. Twenge
Edition: Paperback
Price: $13.82
129 used & new from $0.74

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Frightening But True, June 25, 2010
The Narcissism Epidemic is an attention grabbing book that harshly critiques the individualistic values of contemporary American culture. Twenge and Campbell provide compelling evidence of the increasing prevalence of narcissism and the negative consequences it has on individuals and society. They expand upon the assertion (found in The Culture of Narcissism, by Christopher Lasch) that our educational system is deteriorating, by citing empirical studies indicating that more students get A's now than in the past, despite the visible decrease in performance. They also argue that America's increasingly narcissistic values have contributed largely toward our current economic crisis, and discuss ways of mitigating the individual and societal ramifications of narcissism.

I do question their refutation of the psychodynamic position, that narcissistic people inherently have low self-esteem. According to the authors, this belief has contributed toward our society's acceptance of narcissistic behavior and parents' tendency to reward their children regardless of their performance, in an effort to foster high self-esteem. Twenge and Campbell cite research illustrating that contrary to popular belief, high self-esteem does not facilitate high achievement. I do not think the authors succeed in constructing a logical argument against the psychodynamic position, because they do not clearly define "self-esteem," and take for granted the difference between their meaning and the psychodynamic meaning of the word. Consequently, I am led to question whether they are indeed arguing semantics.

To comment on their disagreement with New Age individualism, I believe that while valuable on the surface, promoting concepts from motivational psychology to help people reach their full potential, the way many New Age author's do, is idealistic and should be offset by articulating how social equality is in no way incongruent with this approach. In the absence of such a dialogue, I fear the widespread consequences that could arise as a result of extremists and/or naive readers buying into unintentional (I hope) propaganda. So while I do not entirely agree with the New Age philosophy as usually depicted, I find the authors' critique to be a bit severe and misleading.

Overall, I think The Narcissism Epidemic is a great book that could lead to a worthwhile discourse on where society is headed and what we, as individuals, can do about it.


The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy, Fifth Edition
The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy, Fifth Edition
by Irvin D. Yalom
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $50.52
213 used & new from $25.31

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Highly Recommended, August 14, 2009
In The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy, Yalom identifies interpersonal problems as a central reason why people are in need of psychotherapy. He illustrates Sullivan's use of the term "parataxic distortions," and the role it plays in group psychotherapy. Parataxic distortions characterize the individual's propensity to mangle their perceptions of others. It appears in an interpersonal situation when one relates to another on the basis of a portrayal occurring primarily in the former's fantasy, rather than on authentic characteristics of the other individual. According to Yalom, an effective psychotherapy group is one in which the primary focus is on the "here-and-now." In addition to recognizing one's parataxic distortions, concentrating on the here-and-now enables the patient to become more aware of how they interact with group members and can provide them with a more realistic view of how others perceive them. This eventually leads to improvement in their interpersonal relationships outside of the group, which in turn addresses many of their reasons for initially seeking therapy.

Yalom offers therapists several useful suggestions. In particular, he describes the most effective ways of handling "problem" patients (e.g. The Monopolist, The Silent Patient, The Characterologically Difficult Patient); the use of written summaries; therapist self-disclosure; the difference between long-term outpatient groups and short-term inpatient groups; and the importance of personal psychotherapy.

My only criticism is that there are portions of the book that are somewhat repetitive. A few of the case vignettes are repeated throughout the book and have been mentioned in other books of his, but I do not consider this to be a major drawback.

Not only do Yalom's recommendations make sense intuitively, he cites research studies to support many of them. I have read most of his books and have found all of them (including his fiction novels) to be both engaging and educational. As a clinician, I find the breadth and depth of his knowledge of psychology, philosophy and literature, along with his creativity and insight, to be quite inspiring.


The Psychological Birth of the Human Infant: Symbiosis and Individuation
The Psychological Birth of the Human Infant: Symbiosis and Individuation
by Margaret S. Mahler
Edition: Paperback
15 used & new from $14.10

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Foundation, August 3, 2009
By observing children epigenetically through their development, Mahler and her colleagues illustrate the Separation-Individuation theory of child development. Separation is characterized as the child's emanation from a symbiotic fusion with the mother. Individuation constitutes those consummations leading to the child's cognizance of his distinctive attributes.

The four developmental sub-phases are differentiation, practicing, rapprochement, and the beginnings of emotional object constancy. Differentiation is characterized by the child's perception of his mother as an extension of himself. The second subphase constitutes "body differentiation" from the mother; the formation of a distinct bond with her; and the augmentation of the "autonomous ego apparatuses," contiguous with the mother. During the rapprochement subphase heightened awareness of physical distinctness accompanied by cognitive growth frequently results in increased separation anxiety. In the fourth subphase incisive individuality and some object constancy is accomplished.

The five case studies presented provide the reader with an understanding of the interplay between the physical, mental and emotional progression of the child, and the role mothering plays in the four subphases. I highly recommend this book to those interested in child development and psychodynamic theory.


The Culture of Narcissism: American Life in an Age of Diminishing Expectations
The Culture of Narcissism: American Life in an Age of Diminishing Expectations
by Christopher Lasch
Edition: Paperback
Price: $12.54
184 used & new from $0.17

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lasch is Brilliant, July 11, 2009
The Culture of Narcissism is a thought-provoking must read for anyone interested in philosophy, psychology, and the unfolding of American society. Lasch addresses the question of why the classic neuroses (i.e., anxiety hysteria, conversion hysteria and obsessive-compulsive neuroses) were replaced by narcissism as the dominant mental disorder in the US. Although Lasch uses Freudian concepts to discuss the evolution of the psyche, he argues that society has precipitated these changes. Lasch examines the driving forces expediting the transformation of the self, including the societal changes occurring since the start of the 20th century and the accompanying infrastructures. The salient yet minimized hierarchical relationships in our society are epitomized through hedonism and materialism, fostering unyielding competition. Simultaneously, our society's distribution of labor causes individuals to depend on others. These factors beget a society in which cooperation and competition coincide, reinforcing the development of individuals with narcissistic, borderline personalities. The ubiquitous threats to our obtained superficial symbols of wealth are without clarity. This has contributed toward the severe compromise of our institutions (e.g. the family, education). Despite being initially written in 1979, the concepts in this book can be applied to today's society. The Culture of Narcissism is definitely an eye-opener.


Page: 1