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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars My recommendation is to measure the rise (zipper length) of ..., June 2, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
My recommendation is to measure the rise (zipper length) of the pants/shorts you normally wear. These have a 6" rise. I don't know who these are made to fit, but certainly not an adult male.


Mens Military-style Heavy Canvas Cargo Pocket Khaki Color Shorts #1048s-KH sizes:38
Mens Military-style Heavy Canvas Cargo Pocket Khaki Color Shorts #1048s-KH sizes:38
Offered by cargo world
Price: $58.32

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Check the rise, June 2, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
My recommendation is to measure the rise (zipper length) of the pants/shorts you normally wear before ordering. These have a 6" rise. I don't know who these are made for, but certainly not a male adult.


No Title Available

5.0 out of 5 stars Run a little tight, May 18, 2015
Ordered an XL (my usual size in sweaters, I like them somewhat loose). It was tight, especially at the waist, so I returned it for a 2XL. Better fit, but these sweaters are form hugging. Really love the style, but get the shoulder and chest measurements before purchasing


US Army Military 5 Button Sweater Geniune Issue 100% Knitted Wool Brown
US Army Military 5 Button Sweater Geniune Issue 100% Knitted Wool Brown
Price: $29.99 - $36.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Run small, May 17, 2015
I have an old XL that fits fine and I love it. However, it's impossible to find it in XL (or 2XL) and when I did it was considerably smaller and I had to return it. These sweaters are great, but get the shoulder and chest measurements before purchasing.


The Complete Crumb Comics, Vol. 15: Mode O'Day
The Complete Crumb Comics, Vol. 15: Mode O'Day
by R. Crumb
Edition: Paperback
Price: $19.99
63 used & new from $10.35

4.0 out of 5 stars Does NOT include the P.K.Dick 'classic', December 5, 2014
According to the Amazon blurb, "The Weirdo section wraps up with yet another classic, 'The Religious Experience of Philip K. Dick'"
Which is the very reason I bought this volume. Alas, this is absolutely incorrect. There is nothing about P.K. Dick in this volume. Lots of other goodies, but not this one.
Edit: After some digging I found that it will be included in "The Complete Crumb Comics Vol. 16: The Mid-1980s: More Years of Valiant Struggle" scheduled for re-publication on June 6, 2015.


Jethro Tull Black Decal Sticker Wall Laptop Notebook Die-cut Black Decal Sticker
Jethro Tull Black Decal Sticker Wall Laptop Notebook Die-cut Black Decal Sticker
Offered by vbnotyetpe
Price: $3.85
4 used & new from $3.85

1.0 out of 5 stars Useless, August 26, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Peel off the white backing and guess what, the letters separate from the clear sticky backing of the decal. Great looking decal, but I couldn't use it.


Irish Setter Men's Havoc WP 800 Gram 10" Big Game Boot,Realtree All Purpose/Brown,11 2E US
Irish Setter Men's Havoc WP 800 Gram 10" Big Game Boot,Realtree All Purpose/Brown,11 2E US

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wide isn't quite as wide in China, December 22, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I haven't worn these outside hiking yet (just indoors for a couple of hours to get the feel of them), but they appear to be rugged and well-made. I take a 10.5 wide in shoes and boots. I typically wear a heavy sock when I hike, and even so am able to wiggle my toes in the hiking boots (Rockport) that I currently wear. But I wanted a heavy duty boot for the winter. Just to be on the safe side I ordered an 11 wide in this boot yet they are on the verge of being uncomfortably snug (so the toe wiggling is somewhat restricted). Getting an 11.5 won't solve the problem so I brought them to a cobbler who can widen them a bit. But I think it worth mentioning that these boots are by no means ‘wide’ and it's going to cost me to have them stretched to fit more comfortably.


Dinosaurs of Eden: Tracing the Mystery Through History
Dinosaurs of Eden: Tracing the Mystery Through History
by Ken Ham
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $12.71
96 used & new from $6.81

48 of 71 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Grade level 4, Intellectual level 0, August 8, 2012
Zero stars. In a wasted effort, kool-ade drinker Ken Ham of the Creationist Museum has put together a appalling piece of farcical, propagandistic nonsense that completely disregards established science. In a blatant and ill-conceived attempt to indoctrinate children with falsehoods, Ham has concocted a specious fairy tale 'history' with no basis in reality.

Attempting to pass off the absurd notion that the age of the Earth (and by extension that of the Universe) can be computed according to a chronological timeline of biblical personages as first proposed by Bishop Ussher in the mid 1600's is one thing, presenting such spurious hogwash in a picture book to brainwash little children into thinking dinosaurs existed with humans is an entirely different matter. That Amazon actually posted this blurb ("this fun family book will transport you on a breathtaking journey through the "time-gate" of the Bible, the true history book of the universe!") is an affront to any sentient being unless you think "The Flintstones" was a documentary.

Update from a professor of geology with some of the utterly absurd illustrations found in this piece of hackery....
[...]
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 19, 2014 2:33 AM PDT


Alien Encounters: The Secret Behind The UFO Phenomenon
Alien Encounters: The Secret Behind The UFO Phenomenon
by Chuck Missler
Edition: Paperback
56 used & new from $0.87

2 of 11 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Bait and switch, April 1, 2012
I thought this would be an objective, unbiased analysis of the UFO phenomenon. And for the first third of the book it is. Then Missler and Eastman veer off into a lengthy debunking of "New Age" ET channeling hokum, and from there into some weird christian and biblically textured version of the UFO phenomenon that I simply could not follow.

What I didn't know when I started reading this book is that Chuck Missler is a messianic evangelical who infamously, and insipidly, tried to debunk Evolution using a jar of peanut butter. So, I suppose if you like angels and demons and Jesus with your UFOs then this is your book. If not, stay away.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 19, 2014 10:56 AM PDT


The Ancient Alien Question: A New Inquiry Into the Existence, Evidence, and Influence of Ancient Visitors
The Ancient Alien Question: A New Inquiry Into the Existence, Evidence, and Influence of Ancient Visitors
by Philip Coppens
Edition: Paperback
Price: $15.72
137 used & new from $6.59

8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Well researched, fair-minded assessment with the following caveats, December 28, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Philip Coppens, a featured commentator on the History Channel's "Ancient Aliens" series, has written, if not exactly a series tie-in then at the least a very timely addition to the questions raised by Erich von Daniken in his landmark book "Chariots of the Gods" and pursued in this tv series.

Coppens seems to cover all the bases and is not afraid to step on toes in debunking claims made, for example, by Zacharia Sitchen that simply do not hold up to scrutiny. Coppens' method is simply to examine the evidence and separate the wheat from the chaff. For example, there is a long standing claim that nuclear explosions took place in ancient India some 8,000 - 12,000 years ago. This is first mentioned on page 118f and then picked up again on page 200f. Zacharia Sitchin and an archeologist named Francis Taylor are cited as having promulgated this notion based on earlier research. Yet when looked at closely, Sitchin's research is selective and misleading and Taylor turns out to be a non-entity. Neither the Indian press nor the "Indian archeological authorities" (p.204) have any idea about "radioactive ash" and the entire scenario is reminiscent of the kind of story put out by "World Weekly News" that cites fictional `academics' to give the semblance of authority to a hoax (this, however, does not hamper the tv series talking heads from promoting things of this sort - alien `rocket ships' and landing strips, for instance - as if they were facts). So, credit Coppens with presenting the story and debunking much of it.

Unfortunately, it appears that Coppens himself is not as careful as he might be. In his discussion of anomalous radiation and other evidence of atomic explosions in ancient India, he writes of one "Albion W. Hart [who] was one of the first engineers to graduate from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)." (p. 117) But Google Mr. Hart and what do you come up with? Zilch. And equally disconcerting, that same sentence repeated in any number of sites: ([..] or[..]). The sentence is also uncredited, which doesn't exactly inspire confidence. One might be tempted to wonder about misconstrued `evidence,' make-believe `authorities' (Taylor and Hart), and the seeming echo-chamber of self-referential speculation that must be taken on faith. Another example of which is when Coppens writes about the supposed return of the Mayan gods based on a partial inscription, and notes that "other Mayan sources reference the return" (p.255) thereby confirming this speculation. Alas, we are left in the dark as to which Mayan sources he has in mind. This kind of thing is endemic to the tv show, but only seem to be the occasional lapse in Coppens' book; nonetheless, one would expect zero tolerance of this sort of thing in a well researched tome.

A few other points: Coppens ventures into the discipline of Philosophy and makes the following claim: "Thales was - in my opinion, unfortunately - also the man who tried to explain everything without incorporating mythology....From Thales onward, we have removed thousands of years of our history, because it was based on or incorporated mythology." (p. 222) In any history of Philosophy text, you'll find Thales as the first philosopher. It is believed that he was instructed by priests of Egypt, as were many of the Pre-Socratic philosophers who succeeded him. Thales sought to understand the world, the Cosmos, without reference to Zeus and the pantheon of gods thought to rule and oversee the Cosmos. Instead of relying on folklore and legends about divinities that made eclipses happen or bring the rain, Thales and those who followed in his footsteps made use of the faculty of Reason to discover the truths of Nature. Thales did not suppress or outlaw myth; he was not responsible for removing thousands of years of history, he simply had no need of it to explain the workings of Nature. It was Christendom that suppressed and outlawed the pagan gods and the myths associated with them, not Thales. It was Christendom that banished the past, not philosophers. So, I have to take issue with Coppens' disparagement of Thales and the scientific method his followers initiated. Without them we might still believe in demi-gods and human sacrifices in order to make the crops grow.

Attendant on this is Coppens' `new age' misappropriation of the term metaphysics to denote the paranormal (p.286). Alas, Metaphysics, as a branch of Philosophy, goes back to Aristotle whose book on `First Principles' was, according to legend, placed next to (Greek: "meta") his book on Physics. Hence, the text was categorized as Meta-Physics. However, whatever gave new agers the audacity to turn this highly technical term into one that denotes the paranormal, or channeling, or whatever fringe pursuit strikes their fancy is beyond my comprehension. That Coppens perpetuates this misnomer and thereby delegitimizes the term goes hand in glove with his disparagement of Thales and the philosophical tradition.

And finally, in the last chapter, "Evidence of Non Physical Contact", things get murky indeed. The term evidence is stretched beyond all cognizance. At this point ET `gods' somehow lead to `contact with God himself - the creator deity." (p. 274) These are untested waters. I have no problem with the basic premise of the ancient alien hypothesis - that ET was taken for civilizing skygods - but what can be made of this "creator deity" that is responsible for "the Creation Act"? (p. 256) That's a whole `nother ball of wax. And while the context is Egyptian and Aztec deities, Coppens leaves the door open for a broader interpretation in line with some kind of judeo-christer theology. Alas.
Comment Comments (9) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 21, 2012 8:12 AM PDT


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