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David M. Scott "David Meerman Scott" RSS Feed (Boston, MA)
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Think Like Your Customer: A Winning Strategy to Maximize Sales by Understanding and Influencing How and Why Your Customers Buy
Think Like Your Customer: A Winning Strategy to Maximize Sales by Understanding and Influencing How and Why Your Customers Buy
by Bill Stinnett
Edition: Paperback
Price: $13.32
131 used & new from $0.01

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential real-world advice for all salespeople, December 23, 2004
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As a sales and marketing executive with 20 years experience selling high-end products and services to Fortune 500 customers all over the world, I thought I already knew how customers think. How wrong I was. Bill Stinnett's terrific "Think Like Your Customer" is chock full of practical and easy-to-use techniques to connect with prospects and to sell effectively. The book provided tons of ideas I had never even considered. What an eye-opener!

This isn't gobbledygook from some sheltered MBA professor. Bill presents his essential advice based on decades of practical experience as a highly successful sales rep as well as a consultant and speaker to the world's greatest sales teams. I was particularly drawn to the hundreds of personal anecdotes and stories Bill tells about winning (and losing too) that help to illustrate the points in the book. The book reads like the sales VP you admire most in the world taking you to lunch every day for a month and spilling all his secrets and stories!

This is a book you will turn to again and again. In fact, maybe you should buy three copies: one for the office, one for the briefcase, and one for home.


Vulture Capital (August Riordan Series, 2)
Vulture Capital (August Riordan Series, 2)
by Mark Coggins
Edition: Hardcover
52 used & new from $0.01

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Silicon Valley cool, September 3, 2002
Vulture Capital is a well executed, slightly twisted and weird, but completely believable story about the dark side of Silicon Valley's start-up community.
Venture Capitalist Ted Valmont is informed that the brains behind a biotechnology start-up he's funded called NeuroStimix is missing. Without the technology guru, NeuroStimix's future is in jeopardy just as a new product designed to aid spinal cord injury victims is about to come to market. Valmont engages PI August Riordan to help find the missing man and we soon learn that the disappearance is part of a larger conspiracy to use NeuroStimix technology for dastardly purposes. To complicate matters, the missing man is Valmont's buddy and Valmont's own brother, as a spinal injury patient, would benefit from the NeuroStimix discovery.
Co-founder of a failed Internet start-up, Mark Coggins injects lots of local color into his work. Technology-types and dot-com veterans will especially appreciate the Silicon Valley photos and clever quotes, which open each chapter. Settings and situations will be familiar to industry types, but the jargon is not overwhelming. The book is even dedicated to the Pets.com Sock Puppet.
VULTURE CAPITAL is the second in a series featuring August Riordan, a private eye we first met in Coggins' well-reviewed debut THE IMMORTAL GAME (2000). THE IMMORTAL GAME received extraordinary attention for a debut title from a very small press. It was chosen as a Penzler pick and nominated for a Shamus Award. This would only happen because the book was good. Expect similar praise for VULTURE CAPITAL. According to the excellent Vulture Capital Website... we can expect more titles to come in the Riordan series


Rain Fall
Rain Fall
by Barry Eisler
Edition: Hardcover
98 used & new from $0.08

28 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the Tokyo atmosphere is perfect, September 3, 2002
This review is from: Rain Fall (Hardcover)
RAIN FALL is a terrific debut about a Japanese-American hit man who works his profession under cover of being a "market-entry consultant" in Tokyo.
The atmosphere of modern Tokyo shines in RAIN FALL. I lived in Japan for seven years and read this book on a recent trip back. Barry Eisler, who was based in Japan for many years, worked for the US Government and earned his black belt at the Kodokan International Judo Center in Tokyo. This is a rare book set in Tokyo that gets the details of setting and mannerisms correct. Too many Japan themed efforts are sloppy and just plain wrong. Your reviewer lived and worked for seven years in and around the exact places described in the novel. The book was read and this review written around the corner from one of the coffee shops described in the book. And another rare feat by Eisler � a Japanese-translated version of RAIN FALL was published in Japan to rave reviews from the local media.
John Rain is an efficient killer who will take on any assignment where the death needs to appear natural. But he�s a killer-for-hire with particular rules of engagement � he only accepts contracts to eliminate principal parties and he will not touch women or children. The plot starts quickly when Rain �s technologically fascinating killing of a Japanese Government official on a subway train goes wrong. There are other people who come from the shadows of the subway car suddenly interested in the contents of the corpse�s suit pockets. As his fee is deposited into a secret account the next day, Rain steps up his caution. But he finds himself hanging out with a jazz pianist who just happens to be the daughter of the government official. And Rain�s old CIA buddies from Viet Nam are mixed up with the dead man somehow and come after him. In great mystery tradition, he doesn�t know who to trust and there seems to be no way out for Rain.
Putnam Publishers says Eisler is at work on another novel featuring John Rain. If he gets the sophomore book to work as well as the debut, we have a major talent to look forward to.


The Blue Edge of Midnight
The Blue Edge of Midnight
by Jonathon King
Edition: Hardcover
228 used & new from $0.01

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars taut, fast-paced debut, April 2, 2002
The Blue Edge of Midnight has it all. This taut, fast-paced debut is certain to put Jonathon King on high on the crime series favorite lists. This is one of those thrillers where time just flies by and pages turn effortlessly.
Max Freeman is an ex-cop from the gritty streets of Philadelphia. Caught in a life-or-death shootout, his career ended at the same moment a bullet from his service weapon ended the life of a twelve-year-old suspect. Taking a lump-sum payment to leave the force, Max lives to the life of a hermit in an isolated shack in the middle of the Florida Everglades. He's made himself so far removed from people that he must paddle his canoe through canals and streams to get to the nearest civilization - an Everglades ranger station.
But Max's world is turned upside-down as he finds the corpse of a child on his river. The demons he's beaten back return to push Max to find the killer(s). King is a master at mixing and matching the high-tech world of helicopters and GPS systems with good old boy Florida gator poachers. The book keeps you guessing `till the end and is filled with just the right amount of twists and turns.
Jonathon King is a new novelist to watch. He earned a "starred review" from Publishers Weekly for this book, which should get him noticed.


The Medici Dagger
The Medici Dagger
by Cameron West
Edition: Hardcover
139 used & new from $0.01

0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Raiders of the Lost Dagger, February 3, 2002
This review is from: The Medici Dagger (Hardcover)
Like Indiana Jones in the original Raiders of the Lost Ark, hero Reb Barnett effortlessly moves through this action-packed adventure with wit, sarcasm, skill and luck. The Medici Dagger is a fast, light, yet predictable read.
Five Hundred years ago Leonardo da Vinci crafted an indestructible and super-light alloy and used it to create the Medici Dagger. According to legend, bad guys with such a weapon could do unspeakable things. However, the only way to actually find the dagger is to read Leonardo's long-lost journals and solve the encrypted message within the Circle of Truth. It is up to our hero Reb, who's day job is a daredevil Hollywood stuntman, to find journals in order to locate the Dagger and thus keep it away from the baddies and save the world from destruction. Reb is the perfect guy for the job. His father was a Leonardo scholar and also the curator of the National Gallery of Art, so Reb has been well schooled in the Great Man from an early age. But, tragically, Reb's parents both died in a mysterious house fire leaving the soon-to-be-orphaned boy to jump from the family home in a foreshadowing of his stunt-man career.
This is Cameron West's first fiction. He's the author of the New York Times best-selling memoir First Person Plural: My Life as a Multiple. West has quite a skilled literary agent - The Medici Dagger has been sold to Paramount for a movie slated to star Tom Cruise.
If a fast-paced mixture of stunts, comedy, hunts for 500-year-old artifacts, international locales, unbelievable set-ups and bad guys with black hats to make certain you know who they are appeals to you, The Medici Dagger may be just the thing for a few hours of adventurous escape.
David Meerman Scott


Strangers on a Train
Strangers on a Train
by Patricia Highsmith
Edition: Paperback
Price: $12.18
110 used & new from $0.46

8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars unpredictability, tension and apprehension, October 18, 2001
This review is from: Strangers on a Train (Paperback)
"The train tore along with an angry irregular rhythm."
The first sentence of Patricia Highsmith's 1951 first novel, Strangers on the Train, evokes emotion and mystery on so many levels, just like her stories and novels work on so many levels. Highsmith's catalog, laden with unpredictability, tension, apprehension, strangeness and irrational viewpoints are classics ripe for a celebrated re-emergence
Norton has accepted the challenge with an announced 15-book initiative that should eventually bring nearly all of her work back into print. The initial release includes as the cornerstone a weighty volume of over 60 short stories written throughout her career, now collected together for the first time: The Selected Stories of Patricia Highsmith. Also re-released in trade paperback are novels Strangers on the Train and A Suspension of Mercy.
True mystery takes the reader into an unpredictable, twisted and scary world. Highsmith writes true mystery. This is most certainly NOT the formula PI novel with a simpleton murder and nice and neat search for the culprit. Highsmith doesn't rely on simple cat and mouse tension. Instead, she's a master of an unpredictable world, a cold and dark place where even you, the reader, are capable of murder. These are not feel-good works. The good guy usually loses, (that is if you can find a good guy). But the reader wins big because the work is so utterly interesting. Highsmith can rightly be called a master.
Strangers on a Train is a terrific introduction to Highsmith's work. Her first, and one of her finest novels, was the source for Alfred Hitchcock's classic 1953 film. From the opening sentence, the book works on many levels. Highsmith delights in surfacing the unsettled forces that lurk inside of the average person, in this case a passenger on a routine train journey.
What are the triggers that cause a seemingly average man to murder? What is good and what is evil? What is normal? Highsmith paints a picture that stretches the imagination to answer these questions in ways we never thought possible. She disturbs you. And she does it in a totally entertaining way.
David Meerman Scott
Author of Eyeball Wars: a novel of dot-com intrigue


The Selected Stories of Patricia Highsmith
The Selected Stories of Patricia Highsmith
by Patricia Highsmith
Edition: Hardcover
87 used & new from $0.01

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a weird and wonderful collection, October 18, 2001
Highsmith's catalog, laden with unpredictability, tension, apprehension, strangeness and irrational viewpoints are classics ripe for a celebrated re-emergence
Norton has accepted the challenge with an announced 15-book initiative that should eventually bring nearly all of her work back into print. The initial release includes as the cornerstone a weighty volume of over 60 short stories written throughout her career, now collected together for the first time: The Selected Stories of Patricia Highsmith. Also re-released in trade paperback are novels Strangers on the Train and A Suspension of Mercy.
Norton's flap copy glows, "Compelling, twisted and fiercely intelligent, The Selected Stories of Patricia Highsmith is a landmark collection, showcasing her mastery of the short story form." What a weird and wonderful collection this is. The comprehensive volume brings together stories from Highsmith's five previously published collections: The Animal Lover's Book of Beastly Murder; Little Tales of Misogyny; Slowly, Slowly in the Wind; The Black House; and Mermaids on the Golf Course. Much has been made of Highsmith's personal life, including her sexuality, expatriate lifestyle in Europe, and the misunderstanding and ignorance of her fellow Americans. Was she compelled to live in Europe because her works are too twisted for her countrymen? Or maybe they were ahead of their time?
In the Animal stories, beasts and bugs are plotting and intelligent creatures who coldly calculate (in the first person no less) the exploitation or destruction of the neighboring humans. You've got to love being inside a caged elephant's head as she sucks up a huge trunk of water and sprays the people staring at her or a cockroach's mind as he explains the merits of the crumbs on the various floors of the hotel he lives in. In a way, Highsmith relates to animals more warmly than she does people. The collection also includes a series of very short stories, vignettes actually, written in the third person and detailing the women of a suburbia that Highsmith obviously deplored. In stories such as The Perfectionist or The Perfect Little Lady, Highsmith paints a landscape that's a nice and neat on the surface but full of wickedness and murder underneath.
True mystery takes the reader into an unpredictable, twisted and scary world. Highsmith writes true mystery. This is most certainly NOT the formula PI novel with a simpleton murder and nice and neat search for the culprit. Highsmith doesn't rely on simple cat and mouse tension. Instead, she's a master of an unpredictable world, a cold and dark place where even you, the reader, are capable of murder. These are not feel-good works. The good guy usually loses, (that is if you can find a good guy). But the reader wins big because the work is so utterly interesting. Highsmith can rightly be called a master. She disturbs you. And she does it in a totally entertaining way.
David Meerman Scott
Author of Eyeball Wars: a novel of dot-com intrigue


All White Girls
All White Girls
by Michael Bracken
Edition: Paperback
Price: $14.95
16 used & new from $4.95

5.0 out of 5 stars Warning: don't lend All White Girls to your mother, September 29, 2001
This review is from: All White Girls (Paperback)
All White Girls is a one-sitting, in-your-face, rapid-fire, hardboiled mystery: and it�s damn good.
In the sleazy, dark corners of strip clubs and adult bookstores lurk the men who prey on young women. And in Bracken�s world there�s a steady flow of fresh, wide-eyed girls arriving at the bus station to feed the pedophiles, pimps and pornographers hunger. But one young woman is missing and another is found dead. Unlicensed private eye �Big Dick� Rickenbacher and Homicide Lieutenant Salvador Castellano cross paths as they�re both hot on the trail of dried sperm, stale beer and young runaways.
This is not a book to lend to your mother. (at least not my mother). All White Girls is full of sexual depravity. But oh is it fun!
Braken is the author of hundreds of short stories and at least seven other mysteries. His latest effort is a fast-paced, surprisingly well-written mystery.


Eager to Please
Eager to Please
by Julie Parsons
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $19.51
117 used & new from $0.01

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars gripping, September 25, 2001
This review is from: Eager to Please (Hardcover)
Irish psychological suspense master Julie Parsons has written another winner with "Eager to Please," her third novel. This title is sure to gain as much critical acclaim as earlier efforts "Mary, Mary" and "The Courtship Gift". "Eager to Please," just like Parsons' earlier efforts, holds the reader in its grip from the beginning.
Rachel Beckett tentatively returns to the strangeness, the joys and the loneliness of freedom after twelve years in prison. Living as an outcast, but constantly watched by her parole officer, Rachel begins to slowly pick herself up. Her seventeen-year-old daughter Amy, just like the long-ago jury, is convinced that Rachel was indeed her father's murderer.
But Rachel has had more than a decade to plan revenge. And she's learned from the best. In prison, from the outcasts and hoodlums she did time with, she's learned tricks and techniques, plotting a fantastic revenge on the real killer.
Throughout the early parts of the book, we're inside Rachel's head as she returns to life on the outside. The inner psychological drama, while deftly handled, wasn't as appealing as the fast-paced, cat-and-mouse suspense of the latter half. As the real killer and the one who went to prison for a crime she didn't commit match wits, the pages turn and the heart thumps.


Closing Time
Closing Time
by Jim Fusilli
Edition: Hardcover
106 used & new from $0.01

12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great New York atmosphere - gritty, foul and charming, September 11, 2001
This review is from: Closing Time (Hardcover)
An incredible portrait of contemporary Manhattan is the setting for this modern Noir debut. The novel's New York atmosphere -- reeking, overwhelming, charming, quaint and foul -- makes an unforgettable location for a thriller. Jim Fusilli's got New York down. Following Terry Orr from the book's opening death scene as a cabdriver is found slain in the city's downtown meatpacking district, a reader feels compelled to stop, look around and sniff. You're in New York and Fusilli's New York grabs you and forces you to pay attention.
Terry is a man haunted by an act of violence that took his wife and infant son. She was a beautiful, Italian artist and with her passing, Terry pours his love into his twelve-year-old daughter Bella. They do cool father-daughter things like go to rock concerts and gallery openings. After the cabdriver's death, Terry finds himself witnessing other seemingly isolated events including an explosion at a gallery that once displayed his late wife's work. He's on his way, honing the PI trade that he's adopted to rid himself of his demons. Terry tends to leave Bella with her Nanny as he moves from one part of Manhattan to another, searching for the people he's lost, but the daughter who loves him may quite possibly be his best hope for survival.
The gritty pulse of the city comes alive with scene after scene like a pick-up basketball game in a downtown "cage" court where perspiration from buffed basketball bodies splashes off the page. Terry studied Turn of the Century New York at St. Johns University and we're with him as he admires a converted bank building in Harlem or the newel post of a Brownstone. With a keen eye, ear and nose for modern New York, Jim Fusilli is a new mystery writer to watch.


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