Profile for David G. Estock > Reviews

Browse

David G. Estock's Profile

Customer Reviews: 13
Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,741,075
Helpful Votes: 312




Community Features
Review Discussion Boards
Top Reviewers

Guidelines: Learn more about the ins and outs of Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
David G. Estock RSS Feed
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2
pixel
Barrister's Bookcase: Downloadable Woodworking Plan
Barrister's Bookcase: Downloadable Woodworking Plan
by Editors of WOOD Magazine
Edition: Digital
Price: $5.95

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Zero if possible because that's what I got from amazon ..., July 10, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Zero if possible because that's what I got from amazon. When I tried to download it I just get a window that says "no matching item". I contacted customer support, they claimed the issue was fixed but it was not. Now I'm out money and haven't heard from customer service again.

I've added one star because they were eventually able to fix the download issue.


Abraham Lincoln: A Life
Abraham Lincoln: A Life
by Michael Burlingame
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $104.00
43 used & new from $54.82

1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great biography; uninspired writing, January 29, 2014
Volume 1 of this biography is worth the price of purchase alone; it has the best coverage of the young Lincoln that I've yet seen.

Volume 2 contains the much more well covered War Years. Part of the problem is likely uncovering new material to fill such a work and here, I think, lies the problem. What you get a great deal of is (to paraphrase): "Lincoln said X at a speech in Harrisburg. Response was generally positive." Followed by three pages of contemporary newspaper editorial supporting the speech. "But not everyone thought so." Followed by three more pages of editors who disagree.

Lastly, the print is quite small and closely spaced. It finally convinced me to invest in a pair of bifocals. Unless you want to show this off on your library shelf the Kindle version might be a better way to go.


Alive on Arrival
Alive on Arrival
34 used & new from $2.71

5.0 out of 5 stars Terrific, July 26, 2013
This review is from: Alive on Arrival (Audio CD)
I saw Steve Forbert at MusikFest In Bethlehem, PA. I knew who he was, and figured he was the biggest name playing that day. Ladies and gentlemen, this guy loves playing music, loves entertaining, and knows how to turn a phrase. If you just heard Romeo's Tune on radio and were curious what he has to offer, please, please buy this album.


The Real Lincoln: A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an Unnecessary War
The Real Lincoln: A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an Unnecessary War
by Thomas J. DiLorenzo
Edition: Paperback
Price: $10.71
104 used & new from $3.78

24 of 54 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Quote this book at your own risk, July 19, 2012
First things first, Lincoln denied Thomas Jefferson's vision for America as an agrarian society. He was an old-line Henry Clay Whig, in favor of banks, internal improvements, and protective tariffs. DiLorenzo is correct in this. Lincoln was absolutely a Federalist. Other Federalists: a couple guys you may have heard of named George Washington and Alexander Hamilton. If you want to make a case against the Federalists, that's OK. It's also OK to re-examine the lives of our cultural icons; there should be no sacred cows. But DiLorenzo so distorts Lincoln's record that it absolutely fails as a biography of Lincoln.

In short, read this if you like, but be prepared to be lumped in with the 9/11 "truthers" and Holocaust deniers if you try to use any of the arguments contained herein.
Comment Comments (6) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 23, 2012 10:28 AM PST


Abraham Lincoln: Redeemer President (Library of Religious Biography)
Abraham Lincoln: Redeemer President (Library of Religious Biography)
by Allen C. Guelzo
Edition: Paperback
Price: $18.75
80 used & new from $3.55

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Phenomenal, August 18, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This follows not just Lincoln's career, but the development of his thought, his opinions, his politics. It does not spare him where he falls short with the Lincoln of popular history, but one can't come away impressed.

Ignore the reviewer from North Carolina with an ax to grind. In the words of Ben Stiller (from "Night at the Museum")-- "the war is over; slavery is bad."

Please read this for an unconventional but insightful look into the 16th president.


Lee
Lee
by Douglas Southall Freeman
Edition: Paperback
Price: $16.66
90 used & new from $1.36

11 of 20 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not a history in the modern sense of the word., July 21, 2010
This review is from: Lee (Paperback)
This is a review of the full four volume set that I purchased from a craigslist seller.

This biography of General Robert E. Lee would have you believe that he was the ultimate Southern gentleman: dutiful, handsome, brave, pious, generous, and nearly faultless practically from the day he was born. It may be so. There's no doubt that he exhibited all of these qualities, but many of the observations no longer ring true. For instance, the author's assertion that because Lee spent very little time in Virginia after going off to West Point, he saw only the "good" side of slavery is a hollow argument in my opinion. Likewise, Lee's own statement that slavery was not only good for the negro (his term) race, but also God's will (and one dare not defy the will of God) is spurious at best. God's will must have mellowed late in the war because Lee himself forwarded a plan to Jefferson Davis to offer emancipation to slaves who would fight for the Confederacy. The apparent contradiction in these views goes unquestioned. His care for the common soldier (even captured Federals) is oft quoted; the state of Union prisoners in the South goes unmentioned (I am being a bit unfair here, as Lee had nothing to do with the administration of POW camps, but you get the point).

Likewise the common soldier of the Army of Northern Virginia is second only to Lee in valor and duty. In fact, 40% of all Southern armies had gone AWOL by 1863. There is hardly any mention of them ever being taken prisoner. Lee had strict standing orders against looting by his soldiers while in the North. Strictly true, but they still took what they wanted and "paid" for it with worthless Confederate currency.

Lee's lieutenants get more even treatment, but even here their rougher edges are polished off. For instance Dick Ewell is said to use "quaint" language; a better description would be "blisteringly profane."

The real treasure of these books is to the planning, maps, movements, and thought processes behind the conduct of the War by the Army of Northern Virginia. I know of no better source for information of the engagements of Lee's Army. Great care is taken to present only the information that Lee had available at the time of each, which makes his victories all the more remarkable. His ability to balance chance and reward in the face of long odds is equally remarkable. The book is also relentlessly footnoted and provides insight into the author's conclusions on topics that are not universally accepted.

In short, a great reference for the Civil War buff, but too skewed for the casual reader.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 24, 2011 3:03 PM PDT


Washington's Secret War
Washington's Secret War
by Thomas Fleming
Edition: Paperback
66 used & new from $0.01

2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Top notch popular history, April 20, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This won't be considered required reading for any students of Washington, but it was a great read nonetheless. It gives a great view into the infighting in the Continental Congress and the suffering of the soldiers at Valley Forge. As a resident of Wayne, PA (named for Gen. "Mad Anthony" Wayne) and living a stone's throw from Valley Forge National Park it was great fun to read about the history of the region.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 4, 2011 7:02 PM PDT


Lincoln President-Elect: Abraham Lincoln and the Great Secession Winter 1860-1861
Lincoln President-Elect: Abraham Lincoln and the Great Secession Winter 1860-1861
by Harold Holzer
Edition: Hardcover
154 used & new from $0.01

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars New view of the interregnum, April 20, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Finding new things to write about Abe Lincoln must be very difficult, but Holzer does an excellent job here. He does a great job supporting his thesis that Lincoln was far from asleep at the wheel while waiting to be inaugurated. A great addition to anyone's Lincoln library.


Hitler and Stalin: Parallel Lives
Hitler and Stalin: Parallel Lives
by Alan Bullock
Edition: Paperback
86 used & new from $0.49

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Succeeds on both counts, March 13, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This is an excellent starting (or ending) point for anyone interested in either of these madmen, though the author seems willing to engage in a bit more speculation when it comes to Hitler. (Most likely because much more is known of Hitler.)

I held back the last star because I felt the author fell in love with his own writing a bit, often substituting a less-known foreign phrase where a perfectly good English word would do just as well.

This small criticism aside, this was excellent history.


The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
by Rebecca Skloot
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $18.35
460 used & new from $0.17

266 of 329 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 5 star story, February 17, 2010
Just so id doesn't sound like I damn this book with faint praise, let me say that this was an excellent story told well (for the most part). I'll save the synopsis for others. Needless to say, Henrietta Lacks' story is just as gripping as the science that was done with her cells. You will most likely enjoy her story (as I did).

My criticisms:

The author spends a rather substantial portion of the book describing her own efforts. It didn't add to Henrietta's story and leaving it out would have made for a better, more concise narrative.

Black people were treated inhumanely to say the least (go look up the Tuskeegee Syphilis Study, for example). At the risk of sounding callous, this is well trod ground and some of it could also have been omitted for the sake of brevity without losing any of the story's impact.

Lastly, there is an implicit condemnation of the doctors that took her cells (the author does say that this was "common practice" at the time). I can tell you that as a former cancer patient who has been biopsied more times than I care to remember, once a doctor removes something from you, it's gone. They are not going to pay you for it.

Those criticism aside, this is a worthy read.
Comment Comments (28) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 4, 2011 7:51 PM PDT


Page: 1 | 2