Your Garage botysf16 Amazon Fashion Learn more nav_sap_plcc_ascpsc $5 Albums Fire TV Stick Subscribe & Save Patriotic Picks Shop-by-Room Amazon Cash Back Offer roadies roadies roadies  Amazon Echo  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Amazon Echo Starting at $49.99 All-New Kindle Oasis AutoRip in CDs & Vinyl Segway miniPro
Profile for B. Furuness > Reviews

Browse

B. Furuness' Profile

Customer Reviews: 8
Top Reviewer Ranking: 124,123
Helpful Votes: 354


Community Features
Review Discussion Boards
Top Reviewers

Guidelines: Learn more about the ins and outs of Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
B. Furuness RSS Feed (Indy)
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Shader: 99 Notes on Car Washes, Making Out in Church, Grief, and Other Unlearnable Subjects
Shader: 99 Notes on Car Washes, Making Out in Church, Grief, and Other Unlearnable Subjects
by Daniel Nester
Edition: Paperback
Price: $14.58
19 used & new from $9.97

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I've always loved Nester's sensibility—wry, November 29, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I've always loved Nester's sensibility—wry, curious, unflinching—and this book doesn't disappoint. It'll keep you up late, gobbling up just one more chapter, and then just one more. What a pleasure to spend a few days in the Shade in the company of the author. I miss it already.


When Mystical Creatures Attack! (Iowa Short Fiction Award)
When Mystical Creatures Attack! (Iowa Short Fiction Award)
by Kathleen Founds
Edition: Paperback
Price: $10.66
69 used & new from $0.37

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars but it was a favorite among the readers and has since become a cult ..., November 5, 2015
The first time I read Kathleen Founds was when she submitted a story called "The Un-Game" to Booth, the magazine where I work. The visiting judge didn't pick her story, but it was a favorite among the readers and has since become a cult classic with the staff. For good reason, too: that story is funny and heartbreaking, and the voices of the teacher and the students in the story crackle with personality.

I waited a long time for this book. I'm happy—so happy—to say that the rest of this book is just as strong as "The Un-Game," and, taken all together, the whole is greater than the sum of its kickass parts. It might be marketed as a story collection, but it reads like a novel, following Laura and Janice on their trips through the outer darkness. Whatever you call the book, though, it's a triumph. The characters in this book are funny and dark and deeply human, haunted by babies and mothers, wanting to give up, holding out for grace. I love this book. Two thousand stars.


Nite Ize Reflective Nylon Cord, Woven for High Strength, 50 Feet, Green
Nite Ize Reflective Nylon Cord, Woven for High Strength, 50 Feet, Green
Price: $11.49
87 used & new from $9.59

12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I have many regrets; buying this rope is not one of them., March 19, 2015
This rope is soft, not scratchy like other, cheaper ropes. It feels waxy, almost soapy against your skin. My pride might be hurt after my Craigslist companion left me tied up and helped herself to my wallet and collection of pewter candlesticks, but my wrists and ankles have never felt so baby-soft. The Nite Ize RR-04-50 Reflective Cord exfoliates *and* moisturizes!

How strong is this rope? So strong. You better hope your chair will break, because this rope won't, no matter how much you strain and cry. (Certain habits and proclivities will probably also get broken through this process). Don't bother using your teeth--unless you want to moisturize your gums; seriously; this thing is like coated in aloe. Oh, and the reflective bits? You might think they're just for show, but when you come hobbling out of your house with chunks of chair dangling off of you and clanking like stupid wind chimes, only to collapse in the street, you're going to be glad that oncoming headlights will light you up like a disco ball, glittering with shame.


Emergency Mylar Thermal Blankets (Pack of 10)
Emergency Mylar Thermal Blankets (Pack of 10)
Offered by Better service stores
Price: $7.05
19 used & new from $7.00

327 of 343 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great for when your wife kicks you out of the tent, March 18, 2015
Great for when your wife kicks you out of the tent and you only have time to grab one thing. Of course it's not going to be as warm as your hollofil sleeping bag (What do some of these one-star reviewers expect? A down comforter? It's an emergency blanket, for God's sake.) but it's better than standing around in the cold as you beg her to let you back inside, or at least to toss out your shoes, too. The Emergency Mylar Thermal Blanket is as big as a bed sheet, but you can fold it up into a tiny little square and stick it in your pocket as you hike out to the interstate to hitch a ride back to the city. If no one picks you up‚€”which is probably going to be the case, what with her claw marks on your face‚€”you can wrap yourself back up and spend the night in the ditch, looking like a discarded burrito, repeating your wife's name over and over, even though you know that saying it a million times won't erase the one time you called her by her sister's name.
Comment Comments (13) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 20, 2016 7:26 AM PST


Can't We Talk about Something More Pleasant?: A Memoir
Can't We Talk about Something More Pleasant?: A Memoir
by Roz Chast
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $16.66
229 used & new from $6.78

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Her sensibility manages to be really serious and really funny, sometimes all at once, January 8, 2015
When Roz Chast left the city to move to a Connecticut suburb, her parents were 78 years old, but the last thing they wanted to do was talk about aging and dying. Whenever Chast brought up the subject, they deflected, denied, re-routed the conversation. It's not that they were ignorant; they were just practiced at ignoring. Time has a way of pressing the issue, though, and after her father showed signs of senile dementia and her mother had a fall, they could no longer avoid the subject. To borrow a phrase from the author: This is a book about people who don't want to deal, being forced to deal.

The fact is that most of us in this country don't want to deal, which must have made this book a tough pitch to publishers. In fact, I wouldn't be surprised if you're squirming a bit right now ("Can't we read something more pleasant?"). But in Chast's hands, the story charms the reader with dark wit and rueful honesty. Her sensibility manages to be really serious and really funny, sometimes all at once. When her father calls Chast to say that her mother took a bad fall and is refusing to go to the hospital, the take-charge mother butts in on the extension and announces, "I wrote a poem about it."

Chast is unsparing in her portrayal of her parents, though it's softened by comedy and sympathy. "Between their one-bad-thing-after-another lives, and the Depression, World War II, and the Holocaust, it was amazing that they weren't crazier than they were." Ultimately, she's harder on herself than anyone else, exposing her worries and shame as she attended to her parents' decline. As a result, we get a loving but clear-eyed picture of a couple's last days, and what it's like to care for them. What Chast has given us, then, is not only a good book, but an important one. Through CAN'T WE TALK ABOUT SOMETHING MORE PLEASANT?, we can all begin to deal.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 15, 2015 9:46 PM PST


Hip Hop Family Tree Book 1: 1970s-1981 (Hip Hop Family Tree)
Hip Hop Family Tree Book 1: 1970s-1981 (Hip Hop Family Tree)
by Ed Piskor
Edition: Paperback
Price: $21.75
76 used & new from $11.98

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Cool Art, Decent Writing, December 23, 2014
In the world of comics right now, the most interesting stuff is nonfiction. And the art is way ahead of the writing. This book is no exception. It looks really cool—huge format and the color is muted on natural pages, like old-school comics—and the subject matter is naturally intriguing. But the writing . . . it's such a barrage of names and <i>this happened, then this happened, then this happened</i> that it's hard to keep track of any of it, much less to know why it's important. The most interesting moments come when the pace slows enough to allow a story to develop, or when the author up some insightful commentary. Unfortunately, this doesn't happen a lot, so the book often feels more like an illustrated timeline than the story of hip-hop's birth and rise. I can't help but think that the book would be better if it tackled less, and developed it all more deeply (They had already planned a multi-volume approach, so why not make more volumes?).

Maybe that's just me, though, trying to impose narrative on something that doesn't have narrative intentions. Maybe the intent is to pepper the reader with factfactfactfact, but if that's the case, then it feels like a missed opportunity to delve into the story-rich history of hip-hop.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Dec 24, 2014 7:41 AM PST


Better Food for a Better World: A Novel
Better Food for a Better World: A Novel
by Erin McGraw
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $25.00
30 used & new from $0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars Big Chill meets Ben & Jerry's, September 25, 2013
"Nobody likes a smartass" is the old saying, but it's not true, is it? Everyone likes a smartass. Or at least I do. If you do, too, check out this book. It's got the crackling talk and razor-wire wit you'll find in all of McGraw's books, but underneath the spiky surface of the main characters, Sam and Vivy, you'll find real pain, real desire, real and rocky love. The smartassery makes me like them; the way they struggle in a marriage makes me love them.


Dragging Wyatt Earp: A Personal History of Dodge City
Dragging Wyatt Earp: A Personal History of Dodge City
by Robert Rebein
Edition: Paperback
Price: $18.10
57 used & new from $1.98

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Man Meets City, July 6, 2013
In this book of engaging essays, Rebein deftly weaves the personal with the historical. Along with getting a sense of what it's like to grow up on the Plains (and to leave, and feel the pull to return), I learned a lot of Real Stuff about Dodge City, horses, feedlots, and much more. None of the essays feel didactic, though. They're all smart without being ponderous, wondering but not wandering, and often funny but never fluffy. I loved this book, and hope to see another book of essays from this writer.


Page: 1