Profile for J. R. Anderson > Reviews

Browse

J. R. Anderson's Profile

Customer Reviews: 2
Top Reviewer Ranking: 2,590,224
Helpful Votes: 73




Community Features
Review Discussion Boards
Top Reviewers

Guidelines: Learn more about the ins and outs of Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
J. R. Anderson "JRAnderson" RSS Feed
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Michael Jordan: The Life
Michael Jordan: The Life
Offered by Hachette Book Group
Price: $14.99

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Comprehensive!, June 5, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
The content itself is great. This issue here is how much you want to read about Jordan's ancestors and early life. I think some of the negative reviews I've read have overstated it, though. By about 15% into the book, you're already dealing with Jordan's high school (varsity) playing, and his recruitment to UNC. From there, the remaining 80-85% is lots of new tidbits about the life you already know: college, the NBA, and post-pro life.

If you're really looking to jump into an inside look at the parts of Jordan's life that you're already somewhat familiar with, skip the first 10-15%. That said, slogging through the early stuff makes the later stuff feel more satisfying.


1776: The Illustrated Edition
1776: The Illustrated Edition
by David G. McCullough
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $43.57
110 used & new from $5.75

68 of 74 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Far from "biased" or "defective", October 8, 2007
It's wildly off the mark to call this book "defective," or David McCullough a "biased historian." The focus here is just far more on the military aspects of The Revolutionary War. This focus lent itself to far more coverage of Washington than Jefferson or Franklin. Other books have covered the political climate and events of that time in spades.

Seeing as "1776: The Illustrated Edition" is not about the political side of America's founding, it seems reasonable (and, I thought, beneficial to the book) to keep the focus narrower, and the depth greater. David McCullough's account of 1776 is no more biased than the writer of a Civil War book who chose to focus on the South, and thus did not give in-depth insights into the role of Ulysses S. Grant in the war.

I would imagine the fact that the previous reviewer has written a book on Benjamin Franklin might be a reason for the preference on seeing Franklin covered in all books about the war. It might also point to the reason for such undue scorn directed at the gorgeous illustrated version of an insightful, enjoyable (and successful) book like "1776."
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 19, 2009 3:00 PM PDT


Page: 1