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James Gallen RSS Feed (St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A.)
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MeasuPro TF1000 ThermoFast Waterproof IPX7 Pen Shape Digital Stem Thermometer, Perfect for Barbecue, Home and Professional Cooking
MeasuPro TF1000 ThermoFast Waterproof IPX7 Pen Shape Digital Stem Thermometer, Perfect for Barbecue, Home and Professional Cooking
Offered by MeasuRite
Price: $22.95

5.0 out of 5 stars Accurate and Sensitive Thermometer, July 27, 2014
This Measupro thermometer is programmable to measure in Celsius of Fahrenheit and can be turned on or off to save the battery. It has a clean, white plastic exterior and an easy to read digital display. The sensor is easy to insert into meat or whatever you are cooking. It is dishwasher safe.

I am really impressed with its quick and accurate adjustment to changing temperatures. You might not be sure about the temperature of cooking meat but it swiftly reported the correct ambient temperature in the house when not being used for cooking. A sample was given to me for testing and review and I am very pleased that it worked as well as it did. I could not have asked for more.


Unves Good Use Julienne Peeler & Slicer - Stainless Steel Fruit Vegetable Peeler & Slicer - Public Loved Professional Peeler - Precision Kitchenware Vegetable Cutter Every Family Needs to Have One
Unves Good Use Julienne Peeler & Slicer - Stainless Steel Fruit Vegetable Peeler & Slicer - Public Loved Professional Peeler - Precision Kitchenware Vegetable Cutter Every Family Needs to Have One
Offered by Unves
Price: $25.95

4.0 out of 5 stars Great For Eye Pleasing Salads, July 27, 2014
This Julienne Peeler/Slicer is a better slicer than a peeler. It is excellent for cutting vegetables like carrots into thin strips for salads. For simple peeling, such as of a potato, it leaves ridges rather than a smooth surface. If you want to prepare food to be treat for the eye as well as the palate, this is the item for you.

This peeler is of stainless steel construction, has a fist size handle for secure grasping and is dishwasher safe easy and thorough cleaning.


OXA Perfume 2600mAh SAFE External Battery 18M WTY Premium Samsung Cells Key Chain charger external portable power supply (Check Amp for tablets) for Smartphones and other electronic devices
OXA Perfume 2600mAh SAFE External Battery 18M WTY Premium Samsung Cells Key Chain charger external portable power supply (Check Amp for tablets) for Smartphones and other electronic devices
Offered by bravolink
Price: $9.99
5 used & new from $8.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly Quick Charge, July 26, 2014
I was given a sample of this for review. This OXA external battery is light and compact. I measure it at 3 ¾" by ¾" by 7/8". Its back and white design is stylish and the key chain is handy. It fits easily into a pocket or purse. I used it to recharge my iPhone and was surprised at how quickly it took the charge. I plan to use this the next time I go on a trip that will require a recharge of my phone.


Twilight
Twilight
by Sherryl Woods
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: $7.19
230 used & new from $0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars An Enjoyable And Intriguing Read, July 25, 2014
This review is from: Twilight (Mass Market Paperback)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I always share Sherryl Woods’ books with the women in my house to get a feminine perspective. “Twilight” is a murder mystery/romance novel. The main character, Dana Miller, a private investigator tries to uncover the mystery behind the murder of her late husband, Ken Miler. Rick Sanchez, Ken’s friend, joins Dana in her investigation. Dana and Rick do not get along at the beginning of the book but they eventually resolve their differences. Author Sherryl Woods does a great job of describing her characters and the events leading up to the surprising ending. “Twilight” is a different type of Sherryl Woods book it is a quite enjoyable and intriguing read.


A Nation Like No Other: Why American Exceptionalism Matters
A Nation Like No Other: Why American Exceptionalism Matters
by Newt Gingrich
Edition: MP3 CD
Price: $23.10

5.0 out of 5 stars A Refresher Course In American Exceptionalism, July 25, 2014
In “A Nation Like No Other” Newt Gingrich gives his views on American Exceptionalism, why America is different from all other countries, where it has strayed from its exceptional path, what it will take to get it back on track and why it is necessary that we do so. He treats the reader to a history lesson about a country built on the idea of freedom country that has fought to defend its ideals and that has voluntarily contributed more to the needy than any land in history. He blasts the Obama Administration for its lack of belief in American Exceptionalism and tells us what we need to do, individually and collectively to reclaim our heritage. He identifies the 2012 elections as a choice between a return to greatness or a continued slide into American mediocrity and increased world-wide danger.

Although the 2012 elections have come and gone and we did not elect Newt President, an unstated but certainly primary goal of the book, it is still an interesting and inspiring read. It reminds me a bit of “Going Rogue” by Sarah Palin (see my review) and Ronald Reagan’s Farewell Address in its unabashed pride in America, and recipe for preserving and improving it. It does us good to read a book like this every once in a while to be reminded, encouraged and energized. Read it, go out and do your part.


Sergeant Stubby: How a Stray Dog and His Best Friend Helped Win World War I and Stole the Heart of a Nation
Sergeant Stubby: How a Stray Dog and His Best Friend Helped Win World War I and Stole the Heart of a Nation
by Ann Bausum
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $18.13
73 used & new from $10.28

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Soldier And His Dog, July 25, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
War Dogs have played a larger role than most people realize (see my review of “Rin Tin Tin: The Life And The Legend by Susan Orleans) Some sniff out bombs, others find the wounded and then there are those who do what a dog does naturally, just be the warriors’ best friends. “Sergeant Stubby” was one of those. He was a stray who adopted a soldier, Robert Conroy of the 102nd Infantry of the 26th, “Yankee” Division, (who probably thought he adopted Stubby) at the training camp at Yale University. Stubby was an American Bull Terrier who shared the chow, returned salutes, was smuggled aboard the troop ship, came under fire and became the mascot of the 102nd Division. He got his own uniform, shared Conroy’s medals and returned home to become the mascot of the mascots. It was he who represented all those canines who comforted the warriors in times of loneliness in shows, at Victory Bond rallies and as he shook the hand of every President of his lifetime. In death Conroy had Stubby’s remains preserved and today they are on display at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History.

Author Ann Bausum’s writing is a narration of war, the soldier’s life and the dog. It is a light, easy read that familiarizes the reader with day to day routine of the American troops in World War I and the surprising role that pets played in their days. Much of the details of Stubby’s life is based on conjecture, “he would have” or “he must have” although many of its appearances are documented. A real dog lover would probably find it to be a heartwarming story. For me it is history-lite.


Disobeying Hitler: German Resistance After Valkyrie
Disobeying Hitler: German Resistance After Valkyrie
by Randall Hansen
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $22.19
28 used & new from $15.30

4.0 out of 5 stars To Whom Did They Owe Their Allegiance?, July 20, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
“Disobeying Hitler” tells the stories, great and small, of resistance to Hitler and the German war machine by both the military and civilians in the latter stages of World War II. The book begins with the status of the war, primarily in the East, leading up to 1944. It uncovers the threads of opposition to the regime that existed in the military, the churches and political parties. It then turns to the attempt on Hitler’s life on July 20, 1944.

Author Randall Hansen examines the assassination attempt in the context of the plans for a coup in the aftermath of its success. He talks about the officers who were, or who might have been involved, those who sat on the fence until word of Hitler’s death or survival was received and those who remained loyal to the regime. He reveals a more extensive web than I had realized and a gamut of motivations for the resisters. Some had been opponents of Hitler and National Socialism from the beginning who were looking for an opportunity to install a more liberal government. Others gradually shifted allegiances as the results of Hitler’s policies became apparent and there were those motivated by sheer pragmatism. When it became apparent that Germany would lose, work out the best peace possible. On the “Jewish Question” resisters ranged from those horrified by the “Solution” to enthusiastic participants in it.

A big question for any student of the German Resistance is the role of Rommel in the July 20 plot. Hansen depicts Rommel Hitler’s golden boy, who, like the Fuehrer, came from a lower class background who was a supporter of Hitler and National Socialism until defeat became inevitable. He then supported some sort of an accommodation with the Western Allies, even contemplating ceasing combat in the West to permit the Americans and British to reach Berlin before the Russians. What did Rommel know about the plot? Hansen seems to think that he probably knew of it and gave some support to the plotters but not necessarily the assassination attempt. In its wake, Rommel paid, as did so many others, with his life. This work follows the path of Hitler’s revenge after the blast.

The July 20 attack at Valkryie occurred as the American and British forces were marching across northern France and Americans would soon invade southern France. Hitler issued his “Nero Order” that every city and position should be defended to the last man and last cartridge. This put every German commander on the spot. Was he to aid the death of the German people who, according to Hitler, had let their nation down and who could have no life after defeat? Of what value were the lives of his men? What of the cultural treasures in harms’ way? When the tide of battle rolled into Germany, to whom did the commander owe his duty? His superiors in Berlin, or the people in the towns he was charged to defend and the German nation that would have to rebuild when the war was over? Should all bridges be destroyed, even those carrying water and electricity to the city to be defended? Hansen displays the roles played by the local civil officials who pleaded with the German officers and negotiated with and guided the Allies to take their communities with the least damage. Ultimately, what difference did the cooperation of those officials make? The swift surrender of Marseilles and Toulon aided the Allies in importing the supplies that fueled their march into Germany. The intact bridges carried the invaders into the heart of the Fatherland, and later sped their recovery of the regions they served. Some resisters were executed and others became civic leaders.

The story is an eye opening one that broadens the readers’ perspectives on the nature of German attitudes and actions in the final throes of the Third Reich. Being generally unfamiliar with German figures I found the book a bit difficult to follow as it moves from one actor to another. The maps are helpful in keeping track of where the actions took place. I would recommend “Disobeying Hitler” for a reader with a fairly good understanding of the course of World War II but not for one just beginning a study of the war.


Ozera 4 Colors of 12 Sets BPA Free Silicone Baking Cup Cupcake Liners Perfect for Muffin, Mini Cakes, Snacks, Frozen Treats and Any Dessert - Quick Baking & Cooling - Easy Loaf Removal - 100% Food Grade Silicone Baking Molds
Ozera 4 Colors of 12 Sets BPA Free Silicone Baking Cup Cupcake Liners Perfect for Muffin, Mini Cakes, Snacks, Frozen Treats and Any Dessert - Quick Baking & Cooling - Easy Loaf Removal - 100% Food Grade Silicone Baking Molds
Offered by Ozera
Price: $19.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great For Parties, July 17, 2014
We tested these Cupcake Liners for purposes of this review. They are colorful and sturdy and hold up well during baking and washing, either by hand or in the dishwasher. The one drawback to them, as reusable liners, is that they must be collected after use, as opposed to tearing open and discarding the paper ones. I doubt that the reusable ones would be our first choice for daily use but they would be particularly attractive for use in ceremonial occasions, such as in a display at a party, or for someone who values reusable items for ecological reasons.


Mickey and Willie: Mantle and Mays, the Parallel Lives of Baseball's Golden Age
Mickey and Willie: Mantle and Mays, the Parallel Lives of Baseball's Golden Age
by Allen Barra
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $17.30
69 used & new from $3.05

4.0 out of 5 stars Baseball Heroes, July 16, 2014
“Mickey and Willie” is a dual biography of two contemporaries who defined baseball excellence during their careers. Their lives had remarkable similarities, friendships, rivalries and personal failures. One thing they had in common was a father who pushed them into baseball. Mickey was the son of a miner from Commerce, Oklahoma and actually rode a horse to school. Willie was the son of a steel worker in a black section of Birmingham, Alabama. Willie played for the Birmingham Black Barons in the Negro leagues while Mickey spent a short time in the minors before making the Big Leagues in New York: a Yankee and a Giant.

Both were power-hitting, fast centerfielders who were the class of their leagues for years. Mickey starred in the World Series and Willie in the All-Star Games. Author Allen Barra delves deeply into statistical comparison trying to determine who the better player was and how many more MVP awards each, particularly Willie, deserved. Mickey was plagued by injuries while Willie remained healthier but claimed to be plagued by his ballparks, the cavernous Polo Grounds and the windswept Candlestick Park. Mickey was the favorite of New York writers while Willie had a long wait for appreciation in San Francisco. Fading is a part of life that each endured, Mickey in Yankee pinstripes while Willie ended up back in New York with the Mets. Willie would always resent that Mickey’s collectibles were more valuable and sought after than his.

Their personal lives make for contrasts with Willie seeming to come out on top. Mickey is depicted as an alcoholic and a skirt chaser. Willie was a teetotaler and loyal to his wives although neither were successful as fathers. Barra treats Willie harshly for his absence from the Civil Rights Movement.

I had known that both were great players, but now have a better understanding of their baseball qualities and personal failings. I think that this book spends too much time trying to quantify their career accomplishments. I came out of this book with a greater appreciation of Willie and less of Mickey and a greater familiarity with the baseball world of their era. I had enjoyed Barra’s earlier book “Yogi Berra: Eternal Yankee” (see my Amazon review). “Mickey and Willie” is a worthy addition to baseball’s story.


Gunsmoke
Gunsmoke
7 used & new from $18.60

5.0 out of 5 stars Return To Dodge, July 12, 2014
This review is from: Gunsmoke (Audio CD)
Between childhood memories of TV’s Gunsmoke and an adult appreciation for radio drama I decided to give “Gunsmoke, Return to Dodge” a try. Good Choice! These 20 radio episodes, aired 1955-1957 present the good, the bad, the ugly and humorous and a bit of heartwarming goodness. There is a lot of shooting, but more reasoning, investigation and action in each half hour program.

The characters are well developed. William Conrad portrays a Matt Dillon we can recognize. I was surprised by the degree of pro-active police work initiated by Marshall Dillon. Parley Boer is the same Chester we remember, but I never knew his last name, Proudfoot. Listeners can draw their own vision of Kitty and Doc Adams is more irritable than I remember him being.

Each story held my interest from start to finish. At times AI did not want to leave the car. Do not skip over the commercials, at least until you are sure that you have heard them. The, and the Public Service Announcements, are glimpses into the world of the 1950s.


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