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Eclipse: Building Commercial-Quality Plug-ins (2nd Edition)
Eclipse: Building Commercial-Quality Plug-ins (2nd Edition)
by Eric Clayberg
Edition: Paperback
34 used & new from $0.01

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent book with lots of tips and detailed diagrams, August 2, 2004
I bought this book at Java One a few weeks ago and have been very happy with it. It is well organized and very easy to read. I have dabbled in writing Eclipse plugins in the past, but never felt like I had a really good grasp of the entire process. This book presents a very clear and concise road map for how to build and package a complete plugin. The book is full of useful tips and words of wisdom that obviously come from years of experience. The authors have also put together some incredibly useful diagrams illustrating how various elements fit together that I had never seen presented anywhere else. While the authors state up front that the book was completed before Eclipse 3.0 was finalized, I found only a couple of places where the material presented was out of sync with the final Eclipse 3.0 release. The main point of this book is to teach you how to write high-quality, 'commercial grade' plugins. In detail, here is what I liked about some of the chapters:

[Chapter 1] This is a very nice intro to using the Eclipse 3.0 tool set for anyone new to Eclipse. Some nice tips are provided for how to make Eclipse run faster and better configure it for use in Java development. As a former VisualAge Java user, I appreciated the authors' tips on how to set up Eclipse to replicate some of my favorite VA Java features.

[Chapter 2] This is a very quick, short tutorial on how to get a quick plugin up and running. Here the authors introduce the 'Favorites' example that they enhance through out the book. It is a well chosen example that, while simple on the surface, provides a great deal of opportunity later in the book for deeper enhancements.

[Chapter 4 & 5] These are excellent overviews of the Eclipse SWT and JFace libraries and provide just enough info to get you started building a plugin. I found the section on the history of SWT to be fascinating given all of the Swing vs. SWT discussions in the press over the last couple of years.

[Chapter 6, 7 & 8] These chapters cover Eclipse Actions, Views and Editors in great detail and helped solve several difficult problems I had with a plugin I am working on. These chapters also included numerous tips and several excellent diagrams showing how the various plugin.xml entries relate to what you see in the workbench.

[Chapter 19] What can I say? I *loved* this chapter the most. I had been struggling horribly with the problem of how to get my plugin working under both Eclipse 2.1 and 3.0. This chapter provides some very easy and elegant solutions to problem of how to build and deploy a plugin on multiple versions of Eclipse from a single source base.


Ender's Shadow (The Shadow Series)
Ender's Shadow (The Shadow Series)
by Orson Scott Card
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: $7.70
282 used & new from $0.01

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating Companion to Ender's Game, July 31, 2004
While this is a great book in its own right, it is also a fascinating companion piece to Card's award-winning Ender's Game. Card seamlessly intertwines Bean's story with Ender's, and this book provides some interesting insight into the events in Ender's Game. If you decide to read this book, you should (re)read Ender's Game first.


Ender's Game (The Ender Quintet)
Ender's Game (The Ender Quintet)
by Orson Scott Card
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: $5.99
465 used & new from $0.01

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Book for All Ages, July 30, 2004
This is a great book for all ages and a great story regardless of whether you like SciFi or not. I've read it and its sequels several times and it never gets boring. I have also given several copies away as gifts and been told that each recipient was quite pleased with the book.

Card's "parallel" book Ender's Shadow is also a great read to get the flip side of the Ender story. Both stories blend seamlessly and complement each other nicely.


SWT: The Standard Widget Toolkit, Volume 1
SWT: The Standard Widget Toolkit, Volume 1
by Steve Northover
Edition: Paperback
30 used & new from $17.88

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Definitive Guide to SWT, July 30, 2004
This is one of two books that I purchased at Java One a few weeks ago (I also have the Gamma/Beck book which is also part of the same series). It is written by the chief architects of SWT itself and provides some wonderful insight into the internals of SWT. The examples are well chosen and easy to follow and lots of tips are provided for dealing various arcane SWT issues.

The book intro includes a section on the history of SWT which I found to be fascinating given all of the Swing vs. SWT discussions in the press over the last couple of years. Every widget and layout manager is discussed in considerable detail and there is a nice discussion on creating custom widgets and using custom graphics.

Ultimately, this is a great reference that you will want to keep close by, if you are planning to build any SWT apps, Eclipse plugins or Eclipse RCP apps. I very much look forward to reading Volume 2!


Contributing to Eclipse: Principles, Patterns, and Plug-Ins
Contributing to Eclipse: Principles, Patterns, and Plug-Ins
by Kent Beck
Edition: Paperback
Price: $36.63
46 used & new from $0.36

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Zen and the Art of Eclipse, July 30, 2004
Once you get past the interesting writing style, this is a pretty cool book written by two of the giants in the industry. This is a particularly good book, if you are interested in Eclipse plugin development and JUnit testing. The tutorial is pretty comprehensive and the book example evolves in a natural way. The only downside is that this book is targeted at Eclipse 2.1 rather than 3.0 (which is no wonder given that it predates 3.0 by more than six months). This doesn't really detract from the book because most of the examples are fairly generic and can be made to run in Eclipse 3.0 with minimal effort.


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