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Norton Security with Backup (For 10 Devices) [Old Version]
Norton Security with Backup (For 10 Devices) [Old Version]
Offered by Geekzany
Price: $65.98
9 used & new from $45.50

11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Dead on Arrival, September 9, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I was really looking forward to being one of the early reviewers for this Norton security product. I've owned and reviewed several of their other security products, and have generally been very happy with them. I was also happy that this product did not include any installation media (CD, USB stick, etc), as it seemed to suggest that it would be a very easy and universally accessible installation for all of my devices. Well, here I am, two days later and after countless hours spent with Norton's online support staff and I am still unable to install this product to a single one of my devices. I've tried it both on my Mac and Windows computers, and each time I enter my activation code and log into my online Norton account I get an error message. I was told to try again after 24 hours, but the same problem has recurred. I have pretty much given up on this product. They might be able to fix this issue by the time they go out with the official mass release, but I personally don't feel comfortable trusting any company with my most valuable files that is unable to figure out how to make their own software work without a major hassle.


Norton Antivirus for Mac [Old Version]
Norton Antivirus for Mac [Old Version]

1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Software, but an Overkill for Most Mac Users, March 7, 2013
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
One of the chief selling points of Apple computers is their relatively high level of security. The combination of a highly closed and integrated operating system on one hand and a relatively low market penetration on the other are for the most part sufficient deterrents that thwart the development and the spread of most computer viruses and other forms of malware. Nonetheless, a few highly publicized security breaches in recent years (mostly involving third-party software) have made me want to take additional steps in trying to protect my Mac computers. Norton Antivirus for Mac seemed like a reasonable and comprehensive Mac security software package, and for the most part it worked as advertised.

**** Installation ****

I installed this software package on my old (2009) Mac Mini running OS X 10.8. Because of this I was happy to install it from a CD, but I think for most users with more recent Macs online installation might be a better and more efficient option. The installation was smooth and it didn't take too long. I had it running within 10 - 15 minutes.

**** Virus Protection ****

For this function you essential have two options: a quick scan and a more thorough system scan. The quick scan was indeed very quick - less than half an hour for my 160 GB hard drive. It did find a few viruses, but all of those were Windows-based viruses. It did not find a single Mac-specific virus. The system scan took substantially longer - three full days for both my internal hard drive and an equivalently sized external backup drive. This is probably the kind of scan that you will do one, or maybe once every few months. It came up with just one suspicious file, which was then removed.

**** Background Operation ****

The security software runs in the background, and it supposedly doesn't interfere with your other functions. I personally don't know how true this is, there probably is some slowdown, but I personally did not notice any significant drop in speed of my work.

**** Conclusion ****

I think that as far as it goes this Norton package does a fine job of scanning for viruses and malware, as well as identifying safe and unsafe Internet sites. However, a relative dearth of Mac-specific viruses, and a single-machine only license make this a bit of an overkill for most users. If you value very highly your peace of mind while working on your Mac then this Norton antivirus package will be worth it. For me, though, it doesn't seem like such a great deal.


Norton Internet Security for Mac [Old Version]
Norton Internet Security for Mac [Old Version]
Offered by Joes Lot
Price: $24.99
7 used & new from $16.92

29 of 33 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Software, but an Overkill for Most Users, March 7, 2013
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
One of the chief selling points of Apple computers is their relatively high level of security. The combination of a highly closed and integrated operating system on one hand and a relatively low market penetration on the other are for the most part sufficient deterrents that thwart the development and the spread of most computer viruses and other forms of malware. Nonetheless, a few highly publicized security breaches in recent years (mostly involving third-party software) have made me want to take additional steps in trying to protect my Mac computers. Norton Internet Security for Mac seemed like a reasonable and comprehensive Mac security software package, and for the most part it worked as advertised.

**** Installation ****

I installed this software package on my old (2009) Mac Mini running OS X 10.8. Because of this I was happy to install it from a CD, but I think for most users with more recent Macs online installation might be a better and more efficient option. The installation was smooth and it didn't take too long. I had it running within 10 - 15 minutes.

**** Virus Protection ****

For this function you essential have two options: a quick scan and a more thorough system scan. The quick scan was indeed very quick - less than half an hour for my 160 GB hard drive. It did find a few viruses, but all of those were Windows-based viruses. It did not find a single Mac-specific virus. The system scan took substantially longer - three full days for both my internal hard drive and an equivalently sized external backup drive. This is probably the kind of scan that you will do one, or maybe once every few months. It came up with just one suspicious file, which was then removed.

**** Background Operation ****

The security software runs in the background, and it supposedly doesn't interfere with your other functions. I personally don't know how true this is, there probably is some slowdown, but I personally did not notice any significant drop in speed of my work.

**** Internet Security ****

The first thing I noticed about the Internet security is that it only works with Safari and Firefox browsers. I use Chrome, and I think Chrome has recently become an overall number one browser for all computer operating systems. (I am not talking about mobile browsers here.) I am not sure if this is due to Chrome's own features (or lack thereof), or if it's Norton's fault, but the effect is the same: it excludes a large proportion of users. I was able to enable the Norton plugin in Safari very quickly and easily. The Safari then acquires and additional Norton tab with a "safe search" input box, powered by Ask.com. I did not use their service in a while, but it seemed like it's doing a decent job of searching the web and presenting their results. The search returns the usual list of websites, but now there are small Norton icons on the side identifying safe sites. You also get the same icons if you use any other major search engine. Most of the sites that I came across in my searches were "green," with perhaps one or two "question" ones. So far I have not come across a single "red," or unsafe, site. I think that the search engines in their own right already do a fairly good job of filtering out unsafe sites.

**** Conclusion ****

I think that as far as it goes this Norton package does a fine job of scanning for viruses and malware, as well as identifying safe and unsafe Internet sites. However, lack of Chrome support, still a relative dearth of Mac-specific viruses, and a single-machine only license make this a bit of overkill for most users. If you value very highly your peace of mind while working on your Mac then this Norton security package will be worth it. For me, though, it doesn't seem like such a great deal.


Corel PDF Fusion
Corel PDF Fusion
Price: $34.96
23 used & new from $23.50

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bare-bones Limited PDF Creation Software, August 1, 2011
This review is from: Corel PDF Fusion (CD-ROM)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
PDF has gradually become the dominant standard for sharing the documents online. PDF documents are highly portable, and can be viewed on virtually any platform. However, the creation of PDF documents remains tricky, and unless you use one of the free but complicated typesetting tools (such as LaTeX), you will need to purchase separate PDF-creation software. Adobe Acrobat is considered the gold standard in this realm, but this program is fairly expensive and not very accessible for quick creation of simple PDF documents.

Coral PDF Fusion is nice bare-bones PDF editing and creation software. The program allows you to create PDF files from a variety of standard sources (Word documents, PDF files, picture files), but not quite the same variety that you would get with Acrobat. Merging several files is fairly straightforward, as is excision of pages from PDF files. The program comes with a limited number of text editing and annotating tools, such as the typewriter, strike-out, highlighter, etc. These are somewhat limited in their functionality, but they get the job done.

If you try to export a PDF document you will be presented with essentially two options: MS Word 1997-2003 format (i.e. .doc files), or a picture format (only .png format). These are far fewer options than what you would have with Adobe Acrobat. The export into a word document works fine for the most part. The problems arise if you edit your PDF document. The highlighted text will disappear, and the striked-through text may look slightly off. Other than that though, the result of exporting was on par with the same exports by Acrobat.

*** The Bottom Line ***

If you just need a program that will let you to smoothly create PDF files from various sources, then Corel PDF Fusion will work for you. However, if you need a program that will have more sophisticated PDF editing and annotating options, as well as a wider range of supported file formats, then you will be better off with a more powerful software package such as Adobe Acrobat.


Office Mac Home and Business 2011 - (1 User/2 Installs)  [Download] [OLD VERSION]
Office Mac Home and Business 2011 - (1 User/2 Installs)  [Download] [OLD VERSION]

25 of 30 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Major Overhaul of Office for Mac, but Still a Poor Stepbrother to the Windows Version, May 27, 2011
Before I start with the review, I would like to say a few things about myself and my experience with Microsoft Office products. I have been using various components of Microsoft Office for almost a couple of decades, on both Windows and Macintosh computers. Right now, I have a copy of Office 2008 on my Mac Mini , as well as Office 2007 on my Windows 7 (formerly Vista) laptop. I also occasionally use iWorks on my iPad, Google docs, and have had some experience with OpenOffice. I use word processing software on a daily basis, PowerPoint more or less regularly for the lectures that I give, Excel for various laboratory exercises, and Apple Mail or Outlook for part of my e-mailing needs.

I obtained my copy of Office 2011 through Amazon Vine products a day ahead of the official release, and have spent most of my first day playing with it and figuring out all of its new and noteworthy features. It is definitely a more than worthy successor of Office 2008, and a huge improvement across the board in almost every category. However, based on my experience, MS Office for Windows is still the gold standard in the category of business productivity software. This version of Office for Mac was supposed to be the first "real" Office in over a decade, and although it comes tantalizingly close to the equivalent Windows version, it is still far from a full-fledged clone. It will, however, make Macintosh computers respectable members of the professional business environment. The biggest improvement in that regard is the final inclusion of Outlook into the Mac version of the Office. Microsoft has also reinstated Visual Basic, which is

Some General Observation

Installation was very smooth and quick. There was no need to remove the previous version of the Office. The full install took up about 1.3 GB of hard drive space.

Office 2011 feels more powerful, more feature-rich and faster than its predecessor. The increase in speed is definitely noticeable, and if you use Office a lot in your line of work, this in itself will make it well worth the upgrade.

In terms of look and feel, the greatest new addition to all Office components is the introduction of Ribbon. Ribbon is an interface where a set of toolbars is placed on tabs in a tab bar. It is highly customizable, and it is context sensitive - various tasks have different ribbon configuration. Microsoft started using Ribbon in Office 2007 in place of taskbars. However, their ribbon has caused a lot of confusion since it was a radical departure from the usual taskbars. Even though the exclusive use of Ribbon declutters the look of various Office applications, it was not too intuitive to use at first. Office 2011 uses both the Ribbon as well as the taskbars, thus making a better and smoother transition to the new functionality. In this sense Office 2011 seems a hybrid of Office 2007 for Windows and Office 2008 for Mac.

One of the major behind-the-scenes improvements of Office 2011 is the return of Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), which was missing from previous versions of Office for Mac. This will facilitate creation of event-driven templates for all of the components of Office 2011. However, the greatest impact of the reintroduction of VBA will undoubtedly be felt in Excel, especially in creation of more sophisticated spreadsheets.

In recent months Microsoft has come up with an online version of Office that is sophisticated enough for most of one's everyday needs, and is positioned to compete directly with Google Docs. Office 2011 is designed to take a full advantage of this new online environment, including online and real-time collaboration with remote colleagues, as well as ample (25 GB as of this writing) online storage in form of SkyDrive. It is possible to directly save and open SkyDrive files from any Office application, as well as drag-and-drop them using Microsoft Document Connection which comes as standard with this version of Office. Personally, I would have liked if it were possible to access SkyDrive through Finder, but overall I am fairly satisfied with its functionality.

Word

One of the great new features is the publishing layouts. They turn Word into a serious desktop publishing tool, as well as a decent website editor. It will not replace Dreamweaver any time soon, but it will be more than effective for small-scale websites.

Word comes with many new themes and styles, which make publication of any sort of new document a breeze. Obtaining new themes and styles from the net has been streamlined, and can be done directly in Word itself.

Documents can now be viewed in a full screen view, which hides all the desktop background as well as both the taskbar and the Ribbon. The latter can still be accessed by moving the cursor to the top of the screen. Full screen is useful when you just want to concentrate on the document itself, whether you are reading it or writing a new one.

My biggest disappointment with this version of Word for Mac was the failure to include the blogging support. Ever since I discovered blogging support in Word 2007 this has been my favorite way of writing and publishing my blog posts. It brought together the full force of a powerful word processor with the simplicity of publishing with a press of a button. I was hoping that this feature will be incorporated into Office 2011, in which case I could start to completely rely on my Mac for all of my authoring needs. Unfortunately, this has not been the case. I guess it would be possible to use website templates to create my blog posts and then upload all the files and the generated html into my site, but this is a rather cumbersome hack to say the least. Microsoft may release a blogging add-on in the near future, but right now I am not counting on it.

Excel

The biggest and most noticeable changes in Excel that will affect majority of users are in terms of new visual aids and presentation styles. Now you can pepper even your datasheets with visual icons, graphics and other tools that help present the information in a much more intuitively accessible ways. Excel 2011 also uses Sparklines, a tool that highlights trends in your data. As mentioned earlier, you are now able to use VBA for more advanced data analysis and table formatting features. VBA is cross-platform compatible and your work should look and feel the same whether you are using it or viewing it on a Mac or a PC.

PowerPoint

Aside from the new look and feel that it shares with other Office 2011 apps, the new PowerPoint seems to have undergone the least amount of change. There are many new templates and visual tools, but some of these (such as video recording) are very limited in their usability. PowerPoint now allows you to directly publish your presentations online, even without Windows Live account. You can share the link to the online presentations with others, and they can view them directly in their browsers. However, it doesn't seem that all browsers are supported, and some of the more media-intense PowerPoint presentations may not play accurately.

Outlook

This is by far the snazziest and most user-friendly version of the Outlook that I have ever used. This is also probably the only Office component which truly feels native in OS X, which may be the reason why it feels so user-friendly. As mentioned earlier, Microsoft did not include Outlook as a part of the Office suite since 1998, and relied instead on a much weaker Entourage for its desktop mail client. This version of Outlook works well with both regular email accounts (such as Gmail, Hotmail, etc.) although I did have some trouble figuring out the correct server/account/password syntax. The same holds for the exchange server connections: most of the trouble usually stems from the obscure documentation for the particular exchange server that you are attempting to connect with. Once you are up and running, though, it is as smooth of a mail client as they come. The bad news is that this version of Outlook is only compatible with Exchange Server 2007 or the later editions. If your company still uses Exchange Server 2003 (or an earlier version) you will not be able to use Outlook with it.

Other Apps

Some other apps that are of interest are the already mentioned Microsoft Document Connection, as well as Microsoft Messenger and Remote Desktop Connection. Microsoft Document Connection is very useful for storing various files onto SkyDrive, including non-Office files such as pdf documents. However, even though SkyDrive comes pre-configured with folders titled "Music" and "Pictures" I was unable to upload jpeg or mp3 files. This is rather odd, but hopefully it will change in the future.

I don't really get to use Microsoft Messenger all that much, but from what I can tell this is more or less the standard version of the app, with a few small tweaks here and there.

Remote Desktop Connection is a neat way of connecting with Windows machines on your local network. However, it does require that you are familiar with what sorts of computers you have connected locally, as well as that all of them are set up correctly for network-sharing.

Conclusion

This is definitely a major upgrade of the Office for Mac, and if you are a power user getting the latest version of this product is a no-brainer. This is especially true if you collaborate on documents and projects with others a lot, or need Outlook for your e-mailing needs. However, if you are more of a casual user you will perceive Office 2011 more as an evolution than a true leap forward. You will probably do just fine for now by sticking to Office 2008.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 23, 2012 7:15 AM PST


BitDefender Total Security 2011 Value Edition - 3 PC/2 year [Old Version]
BitDefender Total Security 2011 Value Edition - 3 PC/2 year [Old Version]

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The Worst Computer Virus Ever, December 18, 2010
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I have owned the previous version of BitDefender Internet security software, and had found it to be a pretty decent program. When I first installed this year's version everything seemed to be just as good if not better than with the previous version - smooth and painless installation, snazzy user interface, small footprint on my hard drive, quiet low-key operation in the background. However, not long ago after I installed BitDefender my computer started acting funny. My programs took forever to run, I couldn't get online, and my computer was acting extremely sluggishly. I thought that maybe I had been infected with a virus, so I tried running the virus detection in BitDefender. To my great surprise, the virus scan wouldn't run and I was being urged to go to the company website. Since I couldn't get online to begin with, this seemed like a completely useless suggestion. When I discovered that other users of this software were having the same problems that I was having it finally dawned on me that BitDefender itself was to blame. First I tried directly removing it through the control panel, but not surprisingly this didn't work. Then I disabled BitDefender and prevented it from starting up at boot time, and this finally did the trick. I was able to reclaim my computer.

It is truly astounding that a major software developer would create such a harmful and dysfunctional product. I really have no idea what had gone wrong with this year's edition, but I am afraid this experience has forever soured my attitude towards BitDefender. I think I'll stick with some more familiar names from now on.


Office Mac Home and Business 2011 - (1 User/2 Installs)
Office Mac Home and Business 2011 - (1 User/2 Installs)
Offered by Juptier Technologies
Price: $279.00
5 used & new from $229.00

375 of 391 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Major Overhaul of Office for Mac, but Still a Poor Stepbrother to the Windows Version, October 26, 2010
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Before I start with the review, I would like to say a few things about myself and my experience with Microsoft Office products. I have been using various components of Microsoft Office for almost a couple of decades, on both Windows and Macintosh computers. Right now, I have a copy of Office 2008 on my Mac Mini , as well as Office 2007 on my Windows 7 (formerly Vista) laptop. I also occasionally use iWorks on my iPad, Google docs, and have had some experience with OpenOffice. I use word processing software on a daily basis, PowerPoint more or less regularly for the lectures that I give, Excel for various laboratory exercises, and Apple Mail or Outlook for part of my e-mailing needs.

I obtained my copy of Office 2011 through Amazon Vine products a day ahead of the official release, and have spent most of today playing with it and figuring out all of its new and noteworthy features. It is definitely a more than worthy successor of Office 2008, and a huge improvement across the board in almost every category. However, based on my experience, MS Office for Windows is still the gold standard in the category of business productivity software. This version of Office for Mac was supposed to be the first "real" Office in over a decade, and although it comes tantalizingly close to the equivalent Windows version, it is still far from a full-fledged clone. It will, however, make Macintosh computers respectable members of the professional business environment. The biggest improvement in that regard is the final inclusion of Outlook into the Mac version of the Office. Microsoft has also reinstated Visual Basic, which is

Some General Observation

Installation was very smooth and quick. There was no need to remove the previous version of the Office. The full install took up about 1.3 GB of hard drive space.

Office 2011 feels more powerful, more feature-rich and faster than its predecessor. The increase in speed is definitely noticeable, and if you use Office a lot in your line of work, this in itself will make it well worth the upgrade.

In terms of look and feel, the greatest new addition to all Office components is the introduction of Ribbon. Ribbon is an interface where a set of toolbars is placed on tabs in a tab bar. It is highly customizable, and it is context sensitive - various tasks have different ribbon configuration. Microsoft started using Ribbon in Office 2007 in place of taskbars. However, their ribbon has caused a lot of confusion since it was a radical departure from the usual taskbars. Even though the exclusive use of Ribbon declutters the look of various Office applications, it was not too intuitive to use at first. Office 2011 uses both the Ribbon as well as the taskbars, thus making a better and smoother transition to the new functionality. In this sense Office 2011 seems a hybrid of Office 2007 for Windows and Office 2008 for Mac.

One of the major behind-the-scenes improvements of Office 2011 is the return of Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), which was missing from previous versions of Office for Mac. This will facilitate creation of event-driven templates for all of the components of Office 2011. However, the greatest impact of the reintroduction of VBA will undoubtedly be felt in Excel, especially in creation of more sophisticated spreadsheets.

In recent months Microsoft has come up with an online version of Office that is sophisticated enough for most of one's everyday needs, and is positioned to compete directly with Google Docs. Office 2011 is designed to take a full advantage of this new online environment, including online and real-time collaboration with remote colleagues, as well as ample (25 GB as of this writing) online storage in form of SkyDrive. It is possible to directly save and open SkyDrive files from any Office application, as well as drag-and-drop them using Microsoft Document Connection which comes as standard with this version of Office. Personally, I would have liked if it were possible to access SkyDrive through Finder, but overall I am fairly satisfied with its functionality.

Word

One of the great new features is the publishing layouts. They turn Word into a serious desktop publishing tool, as well as a decent website editor. It will not replace Dreamweaver any time soon, but it will be more than effective for small-scale websites.

Word comes with many new themes and styles, which make publication of any sort of new document a breeze. Obtaining new themes and styles from the net has been streamlined, and can be done directly in Word itself.

Documents can now be viewed in a full screen view, which hides all the desktop background as well as both the taskbar and the Ribbon. The latter can still be accessed by moving the cursor to the top of the screen. Full screen is useful when you just want to concentrate on the document itself, whether you are reading it or writing a new one.

My biggest disappointment with this version of Word for Mac was the failure to include the blogging support. Ever since I discovered blogging support in Word 2007 this has been my favorite way of writing and publishing my blog posts. It brought together the full force of a powerful word processor with the simplicity of publishing with a press of a button. I was hoping that this feature will be incorporated into Office 2011, in which case I could start to completely rely on my Mac for all of my authoring needs. Unfortunately, this has not been the case. I guess it would be possible to use website templates to create my blog posts and then upload all the files and the generated html into my site, but this is a rather cumbersome hack to say the least. Microsoft may release a blogging add-on in the near future, but right now I am not counting on it.

Excel

The biggest and most noticeable changes in Excel that will affect majority of users are in terms of new visual aids and presentation styles. Now you can pepper even your datasheets with visual icons, graphics and other tools that help present the information in a much more intuitively accessible ways. Excel 2011 also uses Sparklines, a tool that highlights trends in your data. As mentioned earlier, you are now able to use VBA for more advanced data analysis and table formatting features. VBA is cross-platform compatible and your work should look and feel the same whether you are using it or viewing it on a Mac or a PC.

PowerPoint

Aside from the new look and feel that it shares with other Office 2011 apps, the new PowerPoint seems to have undergone the least amount of change. There are many new templates and visual tools, but some of these (such as video recording) are very limited in their usability. PowerPoint now allows you to directly publish your presentations online, even without Windows Live account. You can share the link to the online presentations with others, and they can view them directly in their browsers. However, it doesn't seem that all browsers are supported, and some of the more media-intense PowerPoint presentations may not play accurately.

Outlook

This is by far the snazziest and most user-friendly version of the Outlook that I have ever used. This is also probably the only Office component which truly feels native in OS X, which may be the reason why it feels so user-friendly. As mentioned earlier, Microsoft did not include Outlook as a part of the Office suite since 1998, and relied instead on a much weaker Entourage for its desktop mail client. This version of Outlook works well with both regular email accounts (such as Gmail, Hotmail, etc.) although I did have some trouble figuring out the correct server/account/password syntax. The same holds for the exchange server connections: most of the trouble usually stems from the obscure documentation for the particular exchange server that you are attempting to connect with. Once you are up and running, though, it is as smooth of a mail client as they come. The bad news is that this version of Outlook is only compatible with Exchange Server 2007 or the later editions. If your company still uses Exchange Server 2003 (or an earlier version) you will not be able to use Outlook with it.

Other Apps

Some other apps that are of interest are the already mentioned Microsoft Document Connection, as well as Microsoft Messenger and Remote Desktop Connection. Microsoft Document Connection is very useful for storing various files onto SkyDrive, including non-Office files such as pdf documents. However, even though SkyDrive comes pre-configured with folders titled "Music" and "Pictures" I was unable to upload jpeg or mp3 files. This is rather odd, but hopefully it will change in the future.

I don't really get to use Microsoft Messenger all that much, but from what I can tell this is more or less the standard version of the app, with a few small tweaks here and there.

Remote Desktop Connection is a neat way of connecting with Windows machines on your local network. However, it does require that you are familiar with what sorts of computers you have connected locally, as well as that all of them are set up correctly for network-sharing.

Conclusion

This is definitely a major upgrade of the Office for Mac, and if you are a power user getting the latest version of this product is a no-brainer. This is especially true if you collaborate on documents and projects with others a lot, or need Outlook for your e-mailing needs. However, if you are more of a casual user you will perceive Office 2011 more as an evolution than a true leap forward. You will probably do just fine for now by sticking to Office 2008.
Comment Comments (29) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Dec 30, 2012 9:28 AM PST


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