Profile for N. B. Kennedy > Reviews

Browse

N. B. Kennedy's Profile

Customer Reviews: 617
Top Reviewer Ranking: 646
Helpful Votes: 3222




Community Features
Review Discussion Boards
Top Reviewers

Guidelines: Learn more about the ins and outs of Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
N. B. Kennedy RSS Feed (Hopewell, NJ USA)
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20
pixel
John Boos Chop-N-Slice 16-by-10-Inch Maple Cutting Board
John Boos Chop-N-Slice 16-by-10-Inch Maple Cutting Board
Price: $27.95
9 used & new from $27.95

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My Boos block... my BFF!, April 10, 2014
Seeing all the bad reviews, I have to believe that I just lucked into a good cutting board. I've had this Boos block for three years. It's on the counter at all times (except when the counter's wet) and I use it every day. Other than washing by hand and not immersing it or letting it sit in water, I didn't know I was supposed to take care of it by oiling it. So... my board has been sorely neglected. And, yet, I looked at it closely today and see just one split at a joint on one end, about 2 inches long and only hairline depth. Yes, I have gouged the board while cutting, and I see that people sand (and re-oil) their board when that happens. So, I guess going forward, I'm going to be a better board caregiver. This morning, I oiled it with Viva Labs Coconut Oil. I really do love this board. When I visit my parents, I cook meals to store in their freezer, and even though the car is packed full enough as it is, I always take my cutting board and Wusthof 7" Santoku knife. I'm that picky! I don't understand how people can cut with dull knives on plastic boards... it's too easy for the knife to slip and cut you.


Oreck XL Classic Heritage Series U3840
Oreck XL Classic Heritage Series U3840
Offered by Galaxy Vacuum
Price: $219.00

4.0 out of 5 stars Lightweight, clean and easy to use, April 5, 2014
The last vacuum cleaner I bought was a bagless Hoover Wind Tunnel canister. I thought I wanted to go bagless, because I am notoriously "careful" with my money (i.e., cheap) and I knew I wouldn't want to buy bags. But my strategy backfired -- having to dump out the bin and clean the filter after every use means that I don't vacuum very much. What a dirty, dusty business that is!

So... here I am with my bagged Oreck. It's easy to operate -- just an on/off switch, and a touch of the foot to angle the handle down. The best thing about it is that it is indeed lightweight. I vacuum on two levels, and the Hoover is a bear to heft up and down stairs. I can even vacuum the stairs with the Oreck, juggling it with both arms, although I feel a little like Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Suction is pretty good, although I notice that it couldn't handle some bigger and heavier items (e.g., bits of paper, a splinter of wood). Also, because of the single speed, I don't plan to use it on my antique wool rug. The Hoover has a gentle low speed. The Oreck's cord is really long, which I like because I can do several rooms without pulling the plug. But I do have to wrap the extra cord around my hand sometimes to keep the vacuum from going over it.

Bottom line... I'll use this vacuum for everyday use (or really, every week, or every other week!), and the Hoover for a really good cleaning once in a while and to baby my wool rug. I have a third vacuum, an old hand-held Royal that I use for furniture, which I'll go back to using on the stairs if I start to think I look too ridiculous wrestling with the Oreck. All these vacuums and I used to get along just fine with only an ancient Electrolux! (Check the other listing for this vacuum on Amazon. It's less expensive and eligible for Prime.)


Oreck Classic Heritage Bagged Upright Vacuum, U3840HHS
Oreck Classic Heritage Bagged Upright Vacuum, U3840HHS
Price: $199.99
3 used & new from $161.21

4.0 out of 5 stars Lightweight, clean and easy to use, April 5, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
The last vacuum cleaner I bought was a bagless Hoover Wind Tunnel canister. I thought I wanted to go bagless, because I am notoriously "careful" with my money (i.e., cheap) and I knew I wouldn't want to buy bags. But my strategy backfired -- having to dump out the bin and clean the filter after every use means that I don't vacuum very much. What a dirty, dusty business that is!

So... here I am with my bagged Oreck. It's easy to operate -- just an on/off switch, and a touch of the foot to angle the handle down. The best thing about it is that it is indeed lightweight. I vacuum on two levels, and the Hoover is a bear to heft up and down stairs. I can even vacuum the stairs with the Oreck, juggling it with both arms, although I feel a little like Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Suction is pretty good, although I notice that it couldn't handle some bigger and heavier items (e.g., bits of paper, a splinter of wood). Also, because of the single speed, I don't plan to use it on my antique wool rug. The Hoover has a gentle low speed. The Oreck's cord is really long, which I like because I can do several rooms without pulling the plug. But I do have to wrap the extra cord around my hand sometimes to keep the vacuum from going over it.

Bottom line... I'll use this vacuum for everyday use (or really, every week, or every other week!), and the Hoover for a really good cleaning once in a while and to baby my wool rug. I have a third vacuum, an old hand-held Royal that I use for furniture, which I'll go back to using on the stairs if I start to think I look too ridiculous wrestling with the Oreck. All these vacuums and I used to get along just fine with only an ancient Electrolux!


Love Idol: Letting Go of Your Need for Approval - and Seeing Yourself through God's Eyes
Love Idol: Letting Go of Your Need for Approval - and Seeing Yourself through God's Eyes
by Jennifer Dukes Lee
Edition: Paperback
Price: $9.67
61 used & new from $8.97

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Knowing where your need for approval lurks, April 1, 2014
Sometimes I think the beauty of the passing years is that gradually you begin to care less about what other people think about you. It's very freeing. Although, come to think of it, maybe it's a bad thing, too!

So, perhaps you think you don't have anything to learn from this book. But you would be so wrong! Jennifer Dukes Lee writes about the many ways we seek approval, and how destructive that need can be. And it isn't always about beauty or personality or even the desire to be loved by friends and family.

In Jennifer's case, she writes of a moment in her professional life when she realized she was trying to be a certain kind of person for the benefit of her co-workers. As a reporter for the Des Moines Register, she was sent to vie for a viewing slot for the execution of Timothy McVeigh, who killed 168 people at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City with a truck bomb.

While making her way to the signup sheet for the press lottery, she realized she didn't want to be there; she didn't want this so-called opportunity. "My feet stopped moving," she writes. "I stood under the late-afternoon sun, near the prison, feeling like another kind of prisoner."

Can anyone relate to wanting to uphold an image in front of your colleagues? I sure could! A newsroom is one of those places you absolutely have to maintain a facade of toughness, if not cynicism. Jennifer also writes about trying to gain approval in the home, at church, in front of other moms, and in many other places and situations where self-judgment and recrimination lurk.

Reading Jennifer's book, you'll have a chance to think of where your need for attention, or love, or approval lies. And she urges us to finally let go. "I want to let people know that they matter to God, they matter to others, and they matter to me," she concludes. "Not because of the size of their jeans, their bank accounts, or their influence, but simply because of the size of their God."


Electric Beverage Warmer
Electric Beverage Warmer
Offered by Hold N Storage
Price: $11.80
12 used & new from $11.80

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A workhorse coffee warmer, March 31, 2014
This review is from: Electric Beverage Warmer
I have an even older coffee warmer from this maker, Norpro, same features. It's been chugging along for decades. I've tried other warmers (like Beverage Warmers Candles Warmers Cozy Up Warmers), but the bases can be so large they don't fit between my keyboard and monitor. My Norpro warmer is slightly squared off, instead of round, so it fits just right. It's very basic -- on/off switch and a light to indicate it's on. The warming surface is 3 1/4 inches in diameter. Yes, I wish it had an automatic off switch. I've left it on inadvertently a few times, but it doesn't get hot enough to ignite a fire (whew!), just glues any coffee left in the mug to the bottom.


The Good Spy: The Life and Death of Robert Ames
The Good Spy: The Life and Death of Robert Ames
by Kai Bird
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $19.90
89 used & new from $12.87

27 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A good spy story for the spy-averse reader, March 31, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I wanted to read this book solely for its chapter on the 1983 Beirut embassy bombing. I've read several accounts of the Marine barracks bombing that same year, but nothing in much depth of the embassy tragedy. I have to admit I turned to this chapter first and then went back for the backstory.

As always, I am amazed when a journalist can put his or her hands on so much material that a story like this one can be told almost minute by minute. I'm not sure any of us truly understands the copious amounts of dogged research that goes into a book whose writing seems effortless and a story whose tension mounts with every sentence. I am a new fan of Kai Bird!

When I went back to start at the beginning, I was surprised at how quickly the author's story pulled me in. I'm not a reader of spy fiction or a viewer of spy movies -- I'm so dense when it comes to figuring things out that I'm usually lost and feeling grouchy within minutes. Add to that the difficulty of understanding the politics of the Middle East, and this book could have been a tough slog. But through his focus on the personalities that populate this complex world, Mr. Bird spins a tale not only of intrigue but also of down-to-earth, day-to-day life that will appeal to readers even as clueless as me.


Delancey: A Man, a Woman, a Restaurant, a Marriage
Delancey: A Man, a Woman, a Restaurant, a Marriage
by Molly Wizenberg
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $18.63
72 used & new from $13.07

30 of 38 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars More about the restaurant than the marriage, March 31, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I absolutely loved My Korean Deli: Risking It All for a Convenience Store by Ben Ryder Howe. So I was looking forward to this read that promised a similar, riveting story about a young couple whose marriage is stretched (almost to the breaking point) when they decide to open a pizzeria.

But, sadly, the narrative is bland and gets bogged down in details. It starts out great, as the author sketches out her personality and that of her hobby-loving (but usually hobby-abandoning) husband. But soon after her husband announces his intention to open a pizzeria, the book descends into long passages about learning to make pizza, scouting for a location and opening and running a restaurant. The author, obviously a blogger, includes very few viewpoints from anyone else, including her husband. She talks about her husband, but scenes and dialog including him are sparse, almost nonexistent, except for one dramatic moment when he wants to back out.

I was hoping for more of these moments, but like many blogs turned books, the book has little narrative drive and no story arc. Editors should have had her turn some of the narrative into scenes and dialog, to give the story energy: the old adage "show, don't tell" should be every storyteller's goal. The author does describe the train wreck the restaurant almost made of her life, but it's buried in all the verbiage about restaurant ownership. If you're interested in what it's like to open a restaurant, go for it. But if you're looking for a compelling story of the twists and turns of a young marriage, this isn't it. I would like to read the author's first book, though, the bestselling A Homemade Life: Stories and Recipes from My Kitchen Table, which got great reviews.


Hell Before Breakfast: America's First War Correspondents Making History and Headlines, from the Battlefields of the Civil War to the Far Reaches of the Ottoman Empire
Hell Before Breakfast: America's First War Correspondents Making History and Headlines, from the Battlefields of the Civil War to the Far Reaches of the Ottoman Empire
by Robert H. Patton
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $21.56
66 used & new from $5.96

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A dream book for lovers of journalism, March 31, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I'm a news nerd who jumped up and down with glee when I spotted Ernie Pyle's typewriter at the Newseum in Washington, D.C. So, yes, I loved this book. I'd never considered that the job of war correspondent predated World War II (or even Anderson Cooper). In this book, you'll become familiar with the precursors of today's well-known war reporters -- William H. Russell, Henry Villard, John Russell Young, Januarius MacGahon, Frank Millet, Stephen Bonsal and more.

You'll learn lots of interesting tidbits about the news business from the mid-1800s to early 1900s. Did you know that Alfred Lord Tennyson's famous poem, "The Charge of the Light Brigade," was inspired by a dispatch from William Howard Russell of the London Times? Me neither. That American journalist Stephen Bonsal won the Pulitzer Prize in 1945 for his book about the Treaty of Versailles, Unfinished Business? Another fun fact. That Civil War photojournalist Matthew Brady was a successful society portraiture photographer in New York City?

But, of course, war reporting is not all glamour and fame. It was difficult to read this book. These early journalists were reporting on the most savage global conflicts of their day. The military assumed (wrongly) that the writers would couch their dispatches in glowing terms of glory and heroism. Instead, they had the courage to look and look hard at the carnage and report on the ugliness and tragedy of war.

After you read this book, you might want to read the recent book Stringer by Anjan Sudaram, an AP freelancer who reported from war-torn Congo or War Torn: Stories of War from the Women Reporters Who Covered Vietnam. Definitely read Chris Hedges' classic War Is a Force that Gives Us Meaning for a philosophical look at man's troubling love affair with war from a former war correspondent.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 7, 2014 12:54 PM PDT


OXO Good Grips Garlic Press
OXO Good Grips Garlic Press
Price: $15.99
41 used & new from $6.30

2.0 out of 5 stars Nothing you need to buy, March 30, 2014
I've always appreciated the Good Grips line because of the comfort handles. I have a lot of their kitchen tools. Unfortunately, I'm not so crazy about this one. It's comfortable, yes, but as a time-saver, it fails. The surface area of the press is so large (1 1/4" x 1 1/2") that the garlic simply spreads out on the inside when you press. I think the big square holes diminish the pressure that squeezes the garlic out, too. I'd say not even half comes out of the press. The rest I have to fish out with a knife and cut by hand. Before the garlic even emerges, you get a splashing of garlic juice, and if you're not prepared for it, it'll end up all over you. The red pad that you flip up to clean the press is a great feature. Maybe you make up your time there, without the hassle of cleaning those tiny chambers with a brush. But, bottom line, for me it's back to the generic press that I've used for decades.


OXO Good Grips Garlic Press
OXO Good Grips Garlic Press
Price: $15.99
8 used & new from $12.94

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Just makes more work for me, March 29, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I've always appreciated the Good Grips line because of the comfort handles. I have a lot of their kitchen tools. Unfortunately, I'm not so crazy about this one. It's comfortable, yes, but as a time-saver, it fails. The surface area of the press is so large (1 1/4" x 1 1/2") that the garlic simply spreads out on the inside when you press. I think the big square holes diminish the pressure that squeezes the garlic out, too. I'd say not even half comes out of the press. The rest I have to fish out with a knife and cut by hand. Before the garlic even emerges, you get a splashing of garlic juice, and if you're not prepared for it, it'll end up all over you. The red pad that you flip up to clean the press is a great feature. Maybe you make up your time there, without the hassle of cleaning those tiny chambers with a brush. But, bottom line, for me it's back to the generic press that I've used for decades.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 29, 2014 5:53 PM PDT


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20