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Professional C++
Professional C++
Price: $25.99

5 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good content, poor layout, February 2, 2012
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This review is from: Professional C++ (Kindle Edition)
The overall content of the book is good, but the the fact that so much space on the pages is taken up by the "available for download on wrox.com" icons is annoying. For a book that purports to be a professional publication, it gives it a very unprofessional feel. It makes the book significantly longer than it needs to be, and is distracting to the reader. Note that this review applies to the Kindle version only.The format may be different in the printed version.


Plantronics MX505 Windsmart Boom Headset - Black/Gray
Plantronics MX505 Windsmart Boom Headset - Black/Gray
2 used & new from $21.87

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars False Advertising and stupid design, February 22, 2008
Does not have answer/end button, as advertised. I don't care what other bells and whistles ti has, if I have to open the phone to and push the button while driving, what's the point. One star for wasting my time.


No Title Available

3.0 out of 5 stars Nice school pack. Not for serious outdoor use., November 6, 2007
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This pack has a very comfortable suspension system that distributes the weight well across your shoulders and hips. The bag design is good for school, with lots of pockets for organization. However, it's not suited for serious outdoor use. Very few straps for compression and attaching gear. The ice axe loop is a bit of a joke, though I have used it. The water bottle pockets are small and kind of flimsy. I wouldn't dare tie gear to the lashing strip, for fear it would tear the lightweight fabric. The only zipper without a storm flap over it is probably the one that needs it most. A lot of these features are obviously for show, and not well thought out. So if you want a more versatile bag, get a good climbing pack with a top-loader central compartment.


Mountaineering: The Freedom of the Hills
Mountaineering: The Freedom of the Hills
by Don Graydon
Edition: Hardcover
Offered by PI Quality Books
23 used & new from $17.89

2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very useful and informative; some shortfalls, October 20, 2007
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This is a very useful and informative book, though lacking in some areas. The text, in places, seems to reflect the authors' preferences, rather than conveying the broader perspective of climbers. The author of the navigation section is clearly a good navigator, but not an expert. Early in the section he says to never build rock cairns to mark the path. Then later on in the same section he suggests building them. I think a lot of experienced people would question that one either way.

He also states that a compass without a baseplate is unsuitable for mountaineering. Never mind the fact that military professionals and explorers have gotten along well without baseplate compasses for centuries, and still do today. I rarely use the baseplate on my compass. He says nothing about using protractors, which are actually easier. You can take the map in one hand and a UTM/protractor card in the other, and quickly find bearings. Using a baseplate compass requires both hands to turn the azimuth, takes longer, and provides less accurate results. A military compass works better in low-light conditions, and only requires one hand to take a quick bearing. It also works anywhere in the world.

Doesn't seem like a big deal, unless you've tried to take bearings on top of a windswept and snow-covered ridge with mittens on both hands; and your map's trying to blow away. I use a baseplate compass and a protractor, mainly because the military compass doesn't have a clinometer.

Some think having two devices is more complicated. I disagree. But in any case, it should be mentioned. Disappointing, especially when the author acknowledges that navigation is a central topic to the whole book.

The book doesn't even mention Telemark skis, lumping them with Nordic gear, which is quite different. The author is probably a Randonee gear adherent.

This is a very useful text, though it's not sufficient by itself. Definitely worth the money if you're getting into mountaineering. A good buy for hikers and rock climbers too. You won't regret buying it. It's a good intro, but ultimately you just need to get experience, and figure out what works best for you.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 2, 2012 9:44 PM PST


Delta Force: The Army's Elite Counterterrorist Unit
Delta Force: The Army's Elite Counterterrorist Unit
by Charlie A. Beckwith
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
155 used & new from $0.01

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Page turner. Essential for Spec-ops library., May 10, 2006
I first thought that this book would probably be a bit dull, since it didn't have a lot of combat experiences in it, but is mostly about the formation of Delta. But it's now one of my favorite reads. A real page-turner, it only took me a couple weeks to get through it. I admit that it's enjoyment is probably limited to those with a serious interest in special ops. It has an honest and candid tone that lacks the the egoism of Marzcinko's book about SEAL Six. If your interested in learning more about Delta, I also reccomend reading Eric Haney's book, and Blackhawk Down. All three are very interesting and informative books, that take you inside, are hard to put down, and inspire profound respect for those who serve their country in this capacity.


Inside Delta Force: The Story of America's Elite Counterterrorist Unit
Inside Delta Force: The Story of America's Elite Counterterrorist Unit
by Eric L. Haney
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
133 used & new from $0.01

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Definitely worth reading, May 10, 2006
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There's been a lot of debate over the content of this book and whether Haney should have written it. Friend's of mine in the spec ops community have called Haney a traitor for writing it. Former members of Delta have pointed out inaccuracies in Haney's book. Apparently he is persona non grata in the Delta community now. These are things worth considering when reading the book, but I don't think there's any question whether the book is worth reading. Anyone with a serious interest in specops or Delta would be foolish to pass this one over. It's full of information you're just not going to get anywhere else. Memories are fallible and vary from man to man. I don't see any justification for calling Haney a traitor from this book. He is scrupulous about not revealing sensitive tradecraft, and withholds the identities of those still active with Delta. He is patriotic and very complimentary of his former comrades. It seems to me that Haney is perceived within the Delta community the way Beckwith was perceived within the SF community in general. From his account of events at Desert One, it's clear that Haney didn't review Beckwith's account before publsihing his own. For one, he claims that the helo pilots simply lacked the guts to go ahead with the mission, but Beckwith makes it clear that he steadfastly refused to continue the mission with only five helos. He was certain the mission would fail if they attempted it. I reccomend that anyone who reads this book read Beckwith's book as well. I highly reccomend both books. I also reccomend reading the review by Mrs. Haney found just above mine.


Shadow Warriors: Inside the Special Forces (Study in Command)
Shadow Warriors: Inside the Special Forces (Study in Command)
by Tom Clancy
Edition: Hardcover
407 used & new from $0.01

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Boring!, December 17, 2005
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I labored through about half of this book, anticipating that it would begin to relate in some way to its title. The first part about the origin of SF was interesting. But it went downhill once it commenced with the biography of a former Green Beret without any special ops combat experience, and with only a very short time spent in that community. Stiner's command experience in the spec-ops world seems overstated in this book. None of the other numerous historical books I've read on spec-ops - many by the operators themselves - ever mention Stiner. Clancy seems to know what a good story is, but somehow completely missed it on this one.


Probability and Random Processes with Applications to Signal Processing (3rd Edition)
Probability and Random Processes with Applications to Signal Processing (3rd Edition)
by Henry Stark
Edition: Hardcover
46 used & new from $25.05

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Well written but lacks editing, a bit sloppy, March 12, 2005
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This book is well written, and is especially interesting for electrical engineers because it uses examples from their field almost from the start. However, it is rife with typos, which can be frustrating in a math book, where you often assume its true, then try to figure out why. Also, it exhibits the sloppy math style common to engineers, especially when it comes to the distinction between constants and variables. This can lead to alot confusion at first.


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