Facility Spring Cleaning BDD_MSW16 Amazon Fashion Learn more nav_sap_cbcc_7_fly_beacon $5 Albums Fire TV Stick Grocery Made in Italy Amazon Gift Card Offer out2 out2 out2  Amazon Echo  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Amazon Echo Introducing new colors Kindle Paperwhite UniOrlando ReadyRide Bikes from Diamondback STEM
Profile for Bruce I. Kodish > Reviews

Browse

Bruce I. Kodish's Profile

Customer Reviews: 36
Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,323,887
Helpful Votes: 283


Community Features
Review Discussion Boards
Top Reviewers

Guidelines: Learn more about the ins and outs of Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Bruce I. Kodish RSS Feed (Pasadena, CA United States)
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4
pixel
50 Reasons to Vote for Donald Trump
50 Reasons to Vote for Donald Trump
Price: $1.95

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Trump Is For Real!, March 20, 2016
The Pope, the Chinese Communist government, Mexican globalist Vicente Fox, and the Republican and Democrat establishments, and controlled mainstream media detest him. He speaks straight from the shoulder without a teleprompter and says he will help us make America great again and I believe Donald Trump can actually do it. This book gives some of the reasons you should vote for him to replace the globalist puppet in chief we have now. This book, though short and sweet, is long on quotes and specifics.


No Title Available

3.0 out of 5 stars Cheap hollowed underside defeats good design on top, July 25, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Top part very well designed so person's bottom doesn't fall into their 'business' but the cheap underside of the piece (should be solid but isn't) makes it difficult to slide on bed under person.


Self Warming Pet Bed - Perfect for Dogs or Cats between 11-25 pounds - Heated Cat Bed - Heated Dog Bed - Chocolate Brown Color
Self Warming Pet Bed - Perfect for Dogs or Cats between 11-25 pounds - Heated Cat Bed - Heated Dog Bed - Chocolate Brown Color

3.0 out of 5 stars We'll see how it works., July 15, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
The cat hasn't decided to bed down in it yet.


On the Move: A Life
On the Move: A Life
Offered by Random House LLC
Price: $12.99

5.0 out of 5 stars A must for Sacks fans, May 22, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Here you will find the amazing man behind some of the most important books ever written on personal experience and the human nervous system. Sack's writings are essential reading for transforming the dead, reductionist approach that has held back our understanding and care of the mind-brain into a more personal, individualized and ultimately more scientific approach, what Sacks has called "romantic science". As Korzybski often said 'If you want to understand a book, study the author' so On The Move is especially recommended for anyone who has enjoyed Sack's work.


The Posturality of the Person: A Guide to Postural Education and Therapy
The Posturality of the Person: A Guide to Postural Education and Therapy
by Ronald J. Dennis
Edition: Paperback
Price: $7.95
22 used & new from $7.95

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Clear, practical principles of dynamic posture, May 17, 2013
Posture, as Ron Dennis defines it, "comprises the flow through space and time of all activity of bodily support and movement in the course of living." A study of posture in this dynamic sense leads not only to a descriptive understanding of the state of any person's posture, but also to prescriptive guidelines for assessing the "posturality of the person", the term Dennis has coined for the quality of postural use and the title of this important book. Dennis, a veteran teacher--and teacher of teachers--of the Alexander Technique of postural education, received the 2012 Certificate of Merit from the American Society for the Alexander Technique. His incisive yet brief book (112 pages) is worth multiple readings--but not just for students and teachers of the Alexander Technique. Although the influence from his study and teaching of the Alexander Technique is certainly not negligible, this book is not specifically about that well-known approach to 'posture' and 'movement'. Rather in the notion of posturality, Dennis connects and extends the core concerns of Alexander Technique teachers to those of physical therapists, physicians, chiropractors, personal trainers, psychotherapists, as well as contemporary movement scientists and other students of human physiology and behavior, including students of Korzybski's general semantics (GS)--but more on that connection shortly.

After his opening "Introduction" which outlines the aim and content of the book, Dennis' Chapter 2--"Conceptual Foundations"--provides a list of "22 foundational statements" on "the physiological and developmental issues relevant to the approach of posturality being advocated." The remainder of the book does not thoroughly cover all of these premises, which would require a much larger book or even multiple encyclopedic volumes. Instead, Dennis focuses his remaining chapters on statements 19 through 22, which deal with the notion of "lengthening", the process of arriving at an "optimal structural dimension" of the skeleton, especially the spine, for the least amount of unnecessary strain in movement and support. Subsequent chapters on lengthening include: "Length and Lengthening"; "Why Lengthen?"; "Good Grief, How Do I Lengthen?"; "Dynamic Posturality ~ Moving with Length"; "Breath as Postural Process"' and "Where Do We Go from Here", which surveys various manipulative, exercise, and awareness-based approaches to musculoskeletal health, seen through the lens of posturality. The final chapter 9, "Bibliographic Essay", provides valuable recommendations for further reading, including Science and Sanity and my wife's and my book Drive Yourself Sane: Using the Uncommon Sense of General Semantics. Three appendices follow including a case report by Julie Orta, who describes how--through her work with Dennis--she resolved her personal problems with chronic debilitating neck and shoulder pain; and two articles written by Dennis: "Poise and the Art of Lengthening", and "Muscles and Mentals: How We Get Tense".

The relevance of Dennis' notion of posturality to Korzybski's GS seems clear in Dennis' sharp denial of dualism. Korzybski formulated the problem of dualism in terms of what he called "elementalism", unconsciously dividing up what we don't find divided in the non-verbal, process world. In performing this unconscious isolation of related elements, we are likely to thereby neglect important relationships, contexts, and connections. Our language use can express such elementalistic evaluating by suggesting false-to-fact, static, isolated structures. Dennis, who has studied Korzybski's work, demonstrates throughout the book his consciousness of this problem and resolutely and explicitly emphasizes the relatedness of 'support' and 'movement', as well as the non-separability of 'mechanical'/'physiological' factors from our 'emotional'/'intellectual' life. Dennis' "non-elementalism" is also apparent in his emphasis, following scientist-epistemologist Michael Polanyi, on the importance of personal, phenomenological experience in the study and correction of posturality. In so doing, Dennis suggests the need to resolve the radical split between 'objectivity' and 'subjectivity', which has long remained at the center of Western assumptions about human knowledge. Korzybski, who had F. M. Alexander's books in his personal library, definitely considered the relevance of 'posture' to his own work: clearly expressed in his development of the technique of "neuro-semantic relaxation" (See Korzybski: A Biography, pp. 344, 414-415, 646).

In conclusion, The Posturality of the Person will reward those with professional and theoretical interests in musculoskeletal health as well as general readers looking for a sound, clear and practical basis for dramatically improving their own postural use. As psychologist Kurt Lewin suggested, there is nothing so practical as a good theory. Dennis shows that the split between the 'theoretical' and 'practical' can and must be bridged. Although short and simple, this is not "Posture for Dummies". Wise up and get The Posturality of the Person.


Ayn Nation Under God
Ayn Nation Under God
Price: $2.99

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Veteran Journalist Treats Ayn Rand's Work With The Respect It Deserves, April 9, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
The full title of Hart William's book of connected essays, Ayn Nation Under God: A Rational Examination As To Why Ayn Rand Is Full Of It, indicates his intent and point of view quite well. The essays (most of which appeared in slightly different form on Williams' blog from 2005 to 2012) do not pretend to any faux 'objectivity'. But despite his generally negative opinion of Ayn Rand's work, her fans and followers will make a mistake if they dismiss Williams' ebook, available in Amazon Kindle format, as not worthy of their reading time and effort. For them, and for the non-fans of Rand--in and out of academia--many of whom have dismissed her work as unimportant, Williams provides a most valuable service by treating Rand with the respect she deserves as one of the most influential figures of mid-20th Century to early 21st Century American thought. Indeed, Williams adduces a great deal of evidence to show that Rand--founder of a philosophical school she called "Objectivism"--has become a revered figure and a major inspiration for the Republican Right (especially its more secular wing representing finance and banking) and the allied Libertarian movement, both of which cherish and feel bolstered by Rand's uber-individualist, anti-government, but pro-corporate outlook. Williams has carefully studied Rand's work and his "rational examination" focuses on her basic premises: her view of 'reason', which he finds inadequate, and her basic understanding of human nature, which he finds lacking, indeed monstrously so. His criticism seems to me--a student and advocate of Alfred Korzybski's non-aristotelian viewpoint--devastatingly apt.

Although Williams has not studied Alfred Korzybski's work, he has clearly been influenced by some of the ongoing non-aristotelian currents that Korzybski saw developing in the scientific, intellectual culture of his time, which he sought to systematize and enhance by means of the teachable system that he called "general semantics". (See Selections from Science and Sanity.) "Non-aristotelian" I should emphasize was not for Korzybski anti-Aristotle, not even anti aristotelian logic. Aristotle's logic, for example, may still remain useful--where it applies. But Korzybski did reject the essentialist structural assumptions or metaphysics which Aristotle's logic in particular embodies when interpreted, as Ayn Rand did, as the overarching basis for human 'rationality' and 'reason' rather than as a limited set of guidelines for some forms of discourse. In his first chapter (written especially for the book), Williams--who as a college philosophy major studied mathematical logic--gives his take on Rand's trumpeting of the aristotelian 'laws of thought' and 'pure logic' as the basis for 'reason'. In Atlas Shrugged, she entitled the three sections of the book "Non-Contradiction", "Either-Or", and "A is A". Williams writes that when he first saw her "A is A" years ago, he said "When?": "A is A sometimes, but other times it's not exactly A. In fact, when you say A, you are just specifying THIS A at THAT exact moment in time, which that A will never be again. But it's close enough for government work, or, in this case, anti-government work." Williams further discussion of aristotelian logic seems quite in keeping with Korzybski's take: overdependence on it by using it as a general orientation, as Rand and her followers do, leads to evaluational rigidity and inflexibility.

Williams' critique of Rand's view of human nature also appears quite devastating. Rand cut her heroes from a cartoonish mold where, just as with the fabled politician, they built with their own two hands the log cabin they were born in. She elevates to sacred doctrine an extreme individualism that takes little to no account of the social matrix upon which any individual human accomplishment is based. Perhaps Williams doesn't know much about Korzybski's characterization of humanity as the time-binding class of life (see Manhood of Humanity: The Science and Art of Human Engineering (Dodo Press), but throughout the book he demonstrates his implicit understanding of the time-binding character of humanity and its incompatibility with Rand's extreme version of individuality, embodied in the title of one of her books The Virtue of Selfishness (Signet). Rand erroneously embraces "[a]n almost universal human trait...the ability to discount the endless contributions of others to our thinking process, while magnifying our own 'original' thinking beyond all measure. This is the basis of the American mythos of the 'Self-made man.'..." Rand's extreme elevation of the virtue of selfishness has no place for altruism--at all, at all. According to Rand, Williams notes, "[o]nly when this awful, ridiculous moral notion of self-sacrifice and altruism is rejected will the thinkers/creators/Atlases be free to create. Until then, Galt [one of Rand's heros in Atlas Shrugged] says, they're out." Williams writes that on the contrary, "Man is a SOCIAL animal," "but Ayn Rand and her adherents insanely reject this fundamental truth. As a result, while a few have enriched themselves, our society is falling apart, and our infrastructure is rotting." Thus Rand's work provides the perfect theoretical basis for the current extreme view of individualism supported by 'tea-party' advocates, 'libertarian' think tanks, and the right-wing Republicans, among others. An example of the latter is former Republican Vice-Presidential candidate, Paul Ryan, a staunch right-wing Catholic, who during the campaign attempted to distance himself from the staunch atheist, Rand, he once admired and touted. But despite his new found love for St. Thomas Aquinas, Ryan still seems to be pushing the virtue of selfishness. Not very christian according to some christian's measures, but then again, as Williams points out, "nobody ever went broke providing millionaires with a rationalization for the morality of greed." At the moment, Congressman Ryan seems to be doing quite well.

The book's title, Ayn Nation Under God, might have been better titled Ayn Nation Under Galt, but then again maybe Hart Williams' title is appropriate if we understand Albert Ellis's affirmative answer to the question that was also the title of his book critiquing Rand, Is Objectivism a Religion? At any rate, Hart Williams' book provides a remarkably non-aristotelian look at what is unfortunately becoming (at least to me) Ayn Nation Under Rand. If you want to understand a great deal more about the polarizing belief system that seems to dominate the present political climate in the U.S., you can't do better than read Hart William's book. My summary and quotes don't do justice to his writing. He tenders his conclusions with a large portion of supporting detail served with verve and wit in a book of much greater value than its incredibly low price.


Stop Me If You've Heard This: A History and Philosophy of Jokes
Stop Me If You've Heard This: A History and Philosophy of Jokes
by Jim Holt
Edition: Hardcover
78 used & new from $0.01

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What makes us laugh?, September 15, 2011
Books about what makes us laugh have the reputation of not being particularly funny. At least this one has some jokes and the virtue of shortness. A good introduction to the history and philosophy of jokes.


The Hidden Side of Babel
The Hidden Side of Babel
by Laura E. Bertone
Edition: Paperback
13 used & new from $15.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Contagiously Exciting!, April 17, 2009
Five stars seem inadequate for this fine book. Author Laura Bertone's work as a simultaneous interpreter at major United Nations' meetings and other international conferences goes beyond "translating," since she must capture and convey not just the words but the intended sense of the speaker. In The Hidden Side of Babel, she provides practical wisdom for each of us to similarly understand the intended sense of others and help them to understand us. Cartoons, illustrations and a varied layout enhance the reader's pleasure. I, who usually don't like to reread books, have an urge to dig in once again as soon as I have Babel in my hands. I find Bertone's excitement about language contagious, a contagion which I urge you to expose yourself to.
--Reviewed by Susan Presby Kodish


Metaphors We Live By
Metaphors We Live By
by George Lakoff
Edition: Paperback
Price: $9.08
287 used & new from $1.98

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Case For Experientialism, April 7, 2009
This review is from: Metaphors We Live By (Paperback)
This 1980 book by Lakoff (a linguist) and Johnson (a philosopher) represents an early effort in what they call "cognitive linguistics." In the authors' view, we live our lives according to our "conceptual" systems or systems of understanding. 'Meanings' are constructed by each of us in the course of our interactions with our environments which include our society and culture.

For Lakoff and Johnson, a major aspect of our conceptual systems consists of metaphor, not a matter of "mere language" but of "understanding and experiencing one kind of thing in terms of another."(p. 5) Metaphors such as "good is up" and "bad is down" have a natural basis in our biological experience. Lakoff and Johnson contend that metaphors permeate science, business, politics, and everyday life. Metaphors such as "argument is war" provide assumptive underpinnings for much of our actions. Awareness of such metaphors can help us live more consciously and creatively.

The authors use their view of metaphor to build a case for a philosophy of the human sciences which they call "experientialism." Experientialism rejects "objectivist" claims of absolute 'meaning' or 'truth' separate from human conceptual systems. It also rejects "subjectivist" accounts which deny any standards for agreement or belief other than personal preference. The authors recommend that we see human understanding as a function of our interactions with the world--somewhat plastic, somewhat constrained by the metaphors we live by.


Toward Non-Essentialist Sociolinguistics (Contributions to the Sociology of Language, Vol 56)
Toward Non-Essentialist Sociolinguistics (Contributions to the Sociology of Language, Vol 56)
by Karol Janicki
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars A Ground-Breaking Effort, March 20, 2009
Janicki, a Polish linguistic researcher, explores the background of "cognitive" or "prototype"-oriented linguistics and finds early predecessors in Korzybski's general semantics and the philosophy of Karl Popper.

The terms "essentialist" and "non-essentialist" come from Popper, who viewed the search for eternal 'essences' in definitions and in questions such as "what is truth?" or "what is language?" as a fruitless search for verbalistic certainty that goes back at least to Plato and Aristotle.

According to Janicki, non-essentialism, by contrast, sees 'concepts' as social creations built upon prototypes, each individual's idiosyncratic best example of a term built from personal experience.

This leads to a non-mystical approach to knowledge and language studies. Janicki reports on research he has done based on these notions. He believes that greater tolerance and reduced misunderstanding can result if more people can realize that there is not 'one true meaning' to a word or statement.

Although he seems more heavily influenced by Popper, Janicki notes the contribution of general semantics to his views, although in this 1990 effort he seems to confuse Hayakawa's views with those of Korzybski. With Popper, Janicki continues to talk about the 'mind' and 'concepts', perhaps reintroducing essentialism as he tries to expunge it.

These criticisms aside, Janicki's readable book--after almost twenty years--still seems like a ground-breaking effort in bringing together Popper, Korzybski and cognitive linguistics and in suggesting new research possibilities.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4