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Taming Text: How to Find, Organize, and Manipulate It
Taming Text: How to Find, Organize, and Manipulate It
by Andrew L. Farris
Edition: Paperback
Price: $33.36
99 used & new from $20.84

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Intro for Getting Serious about NLP, October 7, 2013
I love this book. I also love Python. My first into into Natural Language Processing (NLP) was with NLTK for Python. After getting my hands dirty and starting to get some real work done I realized that I had to move to Java. This book is a great intro into that world. The chapters are organized well into tasks that you probably will need to do at some point when working with text. Chapter 4 is worth the price of this book alone.

The examples are easy to follow and the theory is clearly explained.

I was already familiar with OpenNLP when I read this book so I cannot comment on how it feels as a beginner.


Learning OpenCV: Computer Vision with the OpenCV Library
Learning OpenCV: Computer Vision with the OpenCV Library
by Gary Bradski
Edition: Paperback
Price: $39.99
65 used & new from $9.82

68 of 73 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Lacking the C++ API, November 18, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I really love OpenCV. I bought this book and read about 50% of it before starting a project. Initially I found some code on the internet that looked like OpenCV code but was lacking pointers and casts. I learned that this clean code is actually C++ code with heavy use of templates in OpenCV 2.0. Sadly the book is based on OpenCV 1.0, so very little of the code in the book is useable.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 27, 2014 10:59 PM PST


Hadoop: The Definitive Guide
Hadoop: The Definitive Guide
by Tom White
Edition: Paperback
37 used & new from $9.74

27 of 37 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Outdated by the Time it hit the shelf, November 18, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
The APIs in this book were all outdated by the time the book hit the shelf. The authors did recognize this and mention it in the book, however you don't need 400 pages to understand the map-reduce concepts.
I think it's a bad idea trying to publish a book on a rapidly changing community project like Hadoop. I found the Cloudera (free) training materials much more helpful.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 22, 2011 4:26 PM PDT


Nerds on Wall Street: Math, Machines and Wired Markets
Nerds on Wall Street: Math, Machines and Wired Markets
by David Leinweber
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $32.17
45 used & new from $7.92

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Helpful but Could Use Some Editing, August 12, 2010
I liked this book, and I actually spent a few nights reading it in the bookstore before deciding to buy it. As many people point out there are some repetitions in the book. That gets annoying, there are even figures repeated! The author is funny, and provides some insights to the history of wired markets. That's what the cover of this book promises to do and I think it delivers well. I didn't read the chapter on "NOWS Going Green" the whole idea turned me off, and I'll gladly tear out the pages and send them to anyone who is interested.


Quantitative Trading: How to Build Your Own Algorithmic Trading Business
Quantitative Trading: How to Build Your Own Algorithmic Trading Business
by Ernest P. Chan
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $32.66
105 used & new from $24.97

6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Intro to Stat Arb If You Like Matlab, August 12, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I think this is a great book and being an engineer with 10+ years of Matlab I thought the code was very helpful. I can't imagine it being very helpful if you don't know Matlab or another matrix language. The book is a good introduction to quantitative trading for people unfamiliar with the subject. The author is also very active and keeps a blog and provides new material to people have purchased the book. The book has a lot of great refrences that I have turned to get more in-depth knowledge as well. I would buy this book again.


Data Mining: Practical Machine Learning Tools and Techniques, Second Edition (Morgan Kaufmann Series in Data Management Systems)
Data Mining: Practical Machine Learning Tools and Techniques, Second Edition (Morgan Kaufmann Series in Data Management Systems)
by Ian H. Witten
Edition: Paperback
52 used & new from $2.35

5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect Introduction to Data Mining, April 5, 2010
This book is a great introduction to the field of Data Mining. I read it cover to cover, and found it hard to put down. The Weka platform is easy to use and well explained in this book. I have since journeyed into other Data Mining and Machine Learning tools, but I fall back on this book for reference. Every data scientist should have this book on their shelf.


Programming Collective Intelligence: Building Smart Web 2.0 Applications
Programming Collective Intelligence: Building Smart Web 2.0 Applications
by Toby Segaran
Edition: Paperback
Price: $24.73
115 used & new from $8.23

5.0 out of 5 stars Bold New Writing plus best O'reilly book ever, March 29, 2010
This book is spectacular, I love the way that the Author approaches a "new middle" ground of writing books. That is a book that is somewhere in between pure theory, and pure practice. That observation and follow through is simply genius. Python is an excellent choice for this as it can be easy to read. I had to study Python a little before I could totally digest the code. The book is around 300 pages but it is very dense, if someone else wrote it, it would be 600 pages.
Most O'reilly books are boring, useless documentation that you could find on the internet. This book is full of useful examples, showing you how to use "real" data, even how to get the "real" data. For that reason if you are not fond of O'reilly books, don't worry this one is different.

The downside: this book has over 1000 proposed errors and not 1 accepted errors on the O'reilly web site. Some of the code simply does not work as it's written in the book. You can download the code examples but even those do not work 100%. Check the O'reilly site to get the latest code updates. Also the book was published in 2007 and the internet has changed since then so the API's are a little out of date. By not updating this book they are doing the community and they author a huge disservice.


Microsoft® Visual Web Developer™ 2005 Express Edition: Build a Web Site Now! (Developer Reference)
Microsoft® Visual Web Developer™ 2005 Express Edition: Build a Web Site Now! (Developer Reference)
by Jim Buyens
Edition: Paperback
100 used & new from $0.01

3.0 out of 5 stars Don't judge a book by it's cover, July 29, 2007
The cover looks great, that's why I bought this book. I was thinking of publishing a book and really liked the form factor of this book.
-Don't judge a book by it's cover.--
Yeah I knew that, and I actually read this book after reading an O'Reilly book on ASP.NET and a Wrox book on ASP.NET. In essence the MS book covers the same topics as those other two books with much less detail and more colorful pages. The section on data bases is not very helpful for an independent web developer. The MS Now! book on C# has a great introduction to databases if you are interested in that.
Also my printing was missing at least two chapters, and it didn't look like a printing blunder.
Ok, don't buy this book if you want a good ref, but if you are not into books get this one, and look up everything online.


Signals & Systems Demystified
Signals & Systems Demystified
by David McMahon
Edition: Paperback
Price: $20.69
55 used & new from $4.06

24 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book, February 4, 2007
Over all I thought this was a great book. It reviewed the basics I learned in signals and systems over six years ago and taught me some new concepts I wasn't yet aware of. One piece of evidence I have for the quality of this book is: after reading it I was able to pick up a technical journal and felt like I understood most of what they were talking about. Before reading the book I was lost in the technical journals. The math was a little frustrating, but that was simply because I needed to refresh on some things I've forgotten. If you get this book, make sure you work through the problems, it will help out a lot.

Now, I did feel that the book had a few superficial flaws that should be cleaned up for the next printing. The biggest flaws were the lack of tables. The book even refers to Appendix A and Appendix B, and they don't exist in the book I have. (Page 220 refers to Appendix B, and page 118 refers to Appendix A.) These tables really aren't needed, if you are sitting in front of a computer, but if you are reading this book on the plane during takeoff you may feel lost without those tables. I also feel it would be helpful to add a third appendix of common trig identities.

Overall it is a great book.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 29, 2010 6:40 PM PST


The Blind Watchmaker: Why the Evidence of Evolution Reveals a Universe without Design (Reissued in 2006 and 1996)
The Blind Watchmaker: Why the Evidence of Evolution Reveals a Universe without Design (Reissued in 2006 and 1996)
by Richard Dawkins
Edition: Paperback
Price: $18.95
239 used & new from $0.44

26 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars use the tricks of the advocate's trade, December 21, 2005
Awesome, this book really opened my eyes to how natural selection is automatic, how basic and inherent it is. The really profound moments were when Dawkins talks about the origins of DNA and some possibilities with clay, or the "natural sorting" done by simple physics, such as pebbles getting sorted on a beach. The beginning of the book is inspiring, where Dawkins talks about his passion for explaining evolution. As someone involved with explaining technical details from time to time, this comment was very helpful; "You have to become an advocate, and use the tricks of the advocate's trade."

I was also happy to learn about unique animals on the planet, such as the bat's echolocation, and the electric eel. One other big "ah ha" moment was when he defines what it means to be alive, the reasons of this being helpful may not be obvious to everyone today but in 10 years I bet you'll think differently.

The only negatives I remembered were; I felt the last 1/5 of the book was a little slow, and at times the generalizing comments about Americans being truth-hiding Neanderthals was too broad. Come on Richy - not everyone is like that, only 99%.


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