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SonarTech "SonarTech" RSS Feed (Seattle, WA USA)

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Logitech G15 Gaming Keyboard
Logitech G15 Gaming Keyboard
4 used & new from $59.99

2.0 out of 5 stars Logitech Gaming Keyboard software is incompatible with Windows Remote Desktop (RDP)!, September 3, 2014
The Logitech Gaming Software is incompatible with Windows Remote Desktop (RDP), but Logitech couldn't be bothered to print this fact on the box. When you connect to a machine running the Logitech Gaming Software, the software will crash on the local system sometimes giving you a "KHAL Process Terminated Unexpectedly" error message, or the LCD and Macros on the keyboard will just stop working completely when you unlock the machine locally. You have to kill the process and re-start it to make the keyboard work again. Logitech knows about this problem and couldn't care less. Here's a direct quote from their so-called "customer support" team:

"We do apologize for what happen but using the Logitech Gaming Software on a computer which is remotely controlled is a setup that is not supported by the Logitech Gaming Software."

You don't need to actually try and use the gaming software to cause the crash - it crashes the instant anyone connects to the machine over RDP.

So, instead of fixing this problem, Logitech just says it's an unsupported scenario. So, technically, Logitech's Gaming Software is incompatible with some standard Windows services including RDP.

This $100+ keyboard apparently comes with free "unsupported scenarios" and software crashes. Thanks, Logitech!


Logitech Gaming Keyboard G510
Logitech Gaming Keyboard G510

2.0 out of 5 stars Logitech Gaming Keyboard software is incompatible with Windows Remote Desktop (RDP)!, September 3, 2014
The Logitech Gaming Software is incompatible with Windows Remote Desktop (RDP), but Logitech couldn't be bothered to print this fact on the box. When you connect to a machine running the Logitech Gaming Software, the software will crash on the local system sometimes giving you a "KHAL Process Terminated Unexpectedly" error message, or the LCD and Macros on the keyboard will just stop working completely when you unlock the machine locally. You have to kill the process and re-start it to make the keyboard work again. Logitech knows about this problem and couldn't care less. Here's a direct quote from their so-called "customer support" team:

"We do apologize for what happen but using the Logitech Gaming Software on a computer which is remotely controlled is a setup that is not supported by the Logitech Gaming Software."

You don't need to actually try and use the gaming software to cause the crash - it crashes the instant anyone connects to the machine over RDP.

So, instead of fixing this problem, Logitech just says it's an unsupported scenario. So, technically, Logitech's Gaming Software is incompatible with some standard Windows services including RDP.

This $100+ keyboard apparently comes with free "unsupported scenarios" and software crashes. Thanks, Logitech!


Logitech G19 Programmable Gaming Keyboard with Color Display
Logitech G19 Programmable Gaming Keyboard with Color Display
Offered by TMall
Price: $139.50
17 used & new from $93.14

2.0 out of 5 stars Logitech Gaming Keyboard software is incompatible with Windows Remote Desktop (RDP)!, September 3, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
The Logitech Gaming Software is incompatible with Windows Remote Desktop (RDP), but Logitech couldn't be bothered to print this fact on the box. When you connect to a machine running the Logitech Gaming Software, the software will crash on the local system sometimes giving you a "KHAL Process Terminated Unexpectedly" error message, or the LCD and Macros on the keyboard will just stop working completely when you unlock the machine locally. You have to kill the process and re-start it to make the keyboard work again. Logitech knows about this problem and couldn't care less. Here's a direct quote from their so-called "customer support" team:

"We do apologize for what happen but using the Logitech Gaming Software on a computer which is remotely controlled is a setup that is not supported by the Logitech Gaming Software."

You don't need to actually try and use the gaming software to cause the crash - it crashes the instant anyone connects to the machine over RDP.

So, instead of fixing this problem, Logitech just says it's an unsupported scenario. So, technically, Logitech's Gaming Software is incompatible with some standard Windows services including RDP.

This $100+ keyboard apparently comes with free "unsupported scenarios" and software crashes. Thanks, Logitech!


Logitech G19s Gaming Keyboard with Color Game Panel Screen
Logitech G19s Gaming Keyboard with Color Game Panel Screen
Price: $144.99
35 used & new from $114.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Logitech Gaming Keyboard software is incompatible with Windows Remote Desktop (RDP)!, September 3, 2014
The Logitech Gaming Software is incompatible with Windows Remote Desktop (RDP), but Logitech couldn't be bothered to print this fact on the box. When you connect to a machine running the Logitech Gaming Software, the software will crash on the local system sometimes giving you a "KHAL Process Terminated Unexpectedly" error message, or the LCD and Macros on the keyboard will just stop working completely when you unlock the machine locally. You have to kill the process and re-start it to make the keyboard work again. Logitech knows about this problem and couldn't care less. Here's a direct quote from their so-called "customer support" team:

"We do apologize for what happen but using the Logitech Gaming Software on a computer which is remotely controlled is a setup that is not supported by the Logitech Gaming Software."

You don't need to actually try and use the gaming software to cause the crash - it crashes the instant anyone connects to the machine over RDP.

So, instead of fixing this problem, Logitech just says it's an unsupported scenario. So, technically, Logitech's Gaming Software is incompatible with some standard Windows services including RDP.

This $100+ keyboard apparently comes with free "unsupported scenarios" and software crashes. Thanks, Logitech!


Logitech G510s Gaming Keyboard with Game Panel LCD Screen
Logitech G510s Gaming Keyboard with Game Panel LCD Screen
Offered by WindyHub
Price: $90.98
48 used & new from $65.00

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Logitech Gaming Keyboard software is incompatible with Windows Remote Desktop (RDP)!, September 3, 2014
The Logitech Gaming Software is incompatible with Windows Remote Desktop (RDP), but Logitech couldn't be bothered to print this fact on the box. When you connect to a machine running the Logitech Gaming Software, the software will crash on the local system sometimes giving you a "KHAL Process Terminated Unexpectedly" error message, or the LCD and Macros on the keyboard will just stop working completely when you unlock the machine locally. When the software doesn't "fully" crash, it slowly bleeds to death, consuming more and more memory as it leaks. You have to kill the process and re-start it to make the keyboard work again. Logitech knows about this problem and couldn't care less. Here's a direct quote from their so-called "customer support" team:

"We do apologize for what happen but using the Logitech Gaming Software on a computer which is remotely controlled is a setup that is not supported by the Logitech Gaming Software."

You don't need to actually try and use the gaming software to cause the crash - it crashes the instant anyone connects to the machine over RDP.

So, instead of fixing this problem, Logitech just says it's an unsupported scenario. So, technically, Logitech's Gaming Software is incompatible with some standard Windows services including RDP.

This $100+ keyboard apparently comes with free "unsupported scenarios" and software crashes. Thanks, Logitech!


No Title Available

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Try-before-you-buy if you can! These are deceptively small headphones!, December 21, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I'm not a big fella with giant ears. I'm not a Cardigan Welsh Corgi. I'm no Hobbit, either. Or an Ogre, or a Vulcan. I have normal-ish ears, and I was certain Sennheiser's technical description of Ear Coupling as being "circumaural" would be wholly accurate, especially since the price suggests these are some exceedingly premium "top of the line" headphones. Boy was I wrong.

Wikipedia describes the term "circumaural" as follows:

"Circumaural headphones (sometimes called full size headphones) have circular or ellipsoid earpads that encompass the ears. Because these headphones completely surround the ear, circumaural headphones can be designed to fully seal against the head to attenuate external noise."

The MM 550-X headphones are only truly circumaural if you're 15 years old or younger, or you have smaller than average ears. They most definitely are not "full-sized" headphones, either. This is why I heartedly suggest that you try before you buy, if possible, so that you can avoid the huge disappointment of paying hundreds of dollars for premium headphones that don't fit as advertised.

In my case, I stuff the Helix of my ears inside the headphones and then the bottom part of the ear pads end of resting on my ear lobes. That is not "circumaural" as Sennheiser suggests in their technical data. Have you ever gone to sleep with your ear slightly folded forward, then had to deal with that nasty ache for several hours afterwards? That's the same kind of feeling I got after wearing these on my head for 1 hour since they were resting on part of my ears. To be sure they sucked, I wore them for an additional hour the following day, just to make sure I wasn't just being unusually obtuse. They still made my head ache, and I was quite relieved when I took them off. That's not exactly the experience $300+ headphones should deliver.

OK, I'll stop ranting on the crappy fit and move on to the rest of the design.

Did I mention these things were deceptively small? Oh, sorry. Well, they are. Just sayin'. Ahem...

Let's start with the accessories. The headphones come with a pretty complete set of gizmos to get you going. An small proprietary battery (more on that later), requisite audio cable (2.5mm to 3.5mm), a Micro-USB wall charger, in-flight adapters (3.5mm double mono and a 6.3mm adapter) and a "meh" user manual.

The battery is a very lightweight and small 1" x 1" x 0.25" proprietary module (Sennheiser part #BA 370 PX) with built-in USB charging electronics. The headphone-side of the battery uses gold-plated contacts to resist corrosion, and even the mating contacts inside the headphone are gold plated. The 3.7v/1.0Wh Lithium Polymer battery can be charged via the built-in Micro-USB jack, in or out of the headphones, and has a small bi-color LED built-in letting you know when the charge is complete. A small rubber cover hides the USB receptacle when not in use. You get 1 of these proprietary batteries with your $300+ purchase. The battery itself is made in China by Amperex Technology Limited, part #ATL452626. The obvious complaint about the battery is that it's proprietary. Replacements cost around $40 (or $50, if you buy directly from Sennheiser). Considering the battery itself is only 1.0 Wh (which converts to 270mAh), this isn't a reasonable price to pay for a 270mAh Li-Pol battery. You can buy a new 270mAh Li-Pol battery cells for less than $8. And it's wasteful - since Sennheiser integrated the Micro-USB jack AND the charging electronics (5v USB to 4.2v battery charge) into the same battery module, you're paying for a lot more than just the actual Li-Pol battery. So even after the cell fails over time, you'll end up trashing good electronics just to replace a tiny, cheap 270mAh battery. The only real upside to this is if you're hard on USB jacks, and you manage to destroy the Micro-USB jack, it's easy to replace without sending your headphones in for service.

The battery has an additional design "note". The Micro-USB jack fits SUPER snug in the charging receptacle. If you pull the jack out without holding the battery module itself inside the headphones, the entire module will come out before the jack does. The little plastic hook that locks the battery in place will release the battery module without damage.

Oh, by the way - make sure you remember to charge your headphones before you leave. You'll get anywhere from 6 to 10 hours of use out of one fully charged battery, depending on how you have them configured. It's a real shame these "top of the line" headphones don't support AA/AAA batteries, so let's hope you have the means to recharge that one precious battery they give you.

Now for the performance. I was a little underwhelmed by the performance of the Noise Canceling feature on these headphones (aka "NoiseGard"). It's not bad, per se, but it completely eats the legs off anything with any bass, in any mode. It's VERY noticeable. So it does more than cancel the external noise, it also goes to work on whatever audio you're piping in over Bluetooth or hardwire (!!!). That was very disappointing. Bose for the win on the Noise Canceling...

The SRS feature was interesting, and its usefulness will be quite subjective according to each person. It definitely changes the audio, but I can't decide if it's better or worse - I think it'll greatly depend what you're listening to. The noise canceling eats some of the SRS additions, too, so what these headphones end up leaving you with are the following 4 audio modes:

* SRS On / NoiseGard Off: More perceived bass, pretty decent sound
* SRS On / NoiseGard On: Noise canceling is effective, but is costs you bass, but the audio quality is still a bit better (I think)
* SRS Off / NoiseGard Off: Good audio quality, but not $300+ good
* SRS Off / NoiseGard On: Again, bass is significantly reduced, even from the content being supplied over BT or wire

So, 4 flavors of audio to choose from. Each person will have to decide which one they like the most... Still, I was hoping the design of the Noise canceling would be to eliminate ONLY the noise from the outside of the headphones, and not from the audio being sent in over Bluetooth or connected hardwire. That's a pretty significant design fail in my opinion, and again, unworthy of $300+ headphones. One thing I didn't like about the NoiseGard/SRS buttons was the placement: I constantly had to take the headphones off to see where the buttons were and which one I was pressing (maybe you'll get used to the location over time...) I do like how the lights in the buttons turn off after a few seconds to conserve battery life - I don't need a throbbing blue beacon on my head letting everyone know I'm wearing headphones.

The Bluetooth functionality was easy to pair and use. These headphones work well for general-purpose A2DP use, aside from the aforementioned fit issues which would preclude me from wanting to wear these anywhere but on the Airplane - for a flight lasting less than 1 hour. The phone support works well, and the built-in Mic captured my voice effectively. The person on the other end of the call didn't note any issues with the audio quality, and it sounded great on my side, too.

The headphones support APTX audio, which does make a HUGE difference with quality of sound, but unfortunately, most devices don't support APTX. I didn't have an opportunity to evaluate what SRS and NoiseGard does to APTX audio, but I'm sure someone else will cover that.

The headphones fold-up into a nice, compact package, and the 550's come with a decent storage case.

All-in-all, I wasn't impressed for $300+. These headphones should cost no more than $200. They aren't $300+ comfortable, they aren't truly circumaural, they use an over-priced proprietary battery instead of something common like a AA/AAA battery, the NoiseGard features consumes ALL of the bass from anything you're listening to, and they don't fit my (apparent) Ferengi-like ears.

As of 12/21/2013, Sennheiser thinks you should play $399.96 for these things. That's a bunch of _______. Absolutely not worth that much money.

PS: No Corgis were harmed in the writing of this review.


NITECORE NL189 3400mAh Protected 18650 Rechargeable Battery - Designed for TM26 TM15 TM11 and other High Drain Devices
NITECORE NL189 3400mAh Protected 18650 Rechargeable Battery - Designed for TM26 TM15 TM11 and other High Drain Devices
Offered by Join You
Price: $32.15
4 used & new from $21.69

4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars These batteries are SUPER fragile!, October 24, 2013
When loading my LED light on a counter, 3 of these batteries accidentally rolled off the counter on to the hard wood floor. We're talking 3-4 feet... Two of the batteries literally tore open on the end, and the 3rd battery looked like someone had hammered the top button into the battery - it too split open. Absolutely ridiculous. My friend and I were completely stunned that these things are as fragile as they are. They seemed to work fine, but they very clearly aren't durable AT ALL. Don't drop these things! They clearly have no internal structural reinforcement whatsoever.


NITECORE Tiny Monster TM26 QuadRay 3500 Lumen Quad CREE XM-L LED Flashlight / Searchlight with 4 X Nitecore NL189 3400mAh 18650 rechargeable batteries, Nitecore car charging adaptor, Nitecore wall charger, Nitecore holster, EdisonBright Batteries sampler pack and Smith & Wesson Red Carabeamer Clip Light Package
NITECORE Tiny Monster TM26 QuadRay 3500 Lumen Quad CREE XM-L LED Flashlight / Searchlight with 4 X Nitecore NL189 3400mAh 18650 rechargeable batteries, Nitecore car charging adaptor, Nitecore wall charger, Nitecore holster, EdisonBright Batteries sampler pack and Smith & Wesson Red Carabeamer Clip Light Package
Offered by EdisonBright®
Price: $299.95
2 used & new from $299.95

10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great LED light, but watch out for the 3400mAh 16850 batteries - they're very fragile!, October 24, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This is a great kit - the light itself is incredibly bright and very well made. There's plenty of review on the TM26 light available online, but what I want you to know about is how fragile these NiteCore 3400mAh 16850 batteries are. When loading my light on a counter, 3 batteries accidentally rolled off the counter on to the hard wood floor. We're talking 3-4 feet... Two of the batteries literally tore open on the end, and the 3rd battery looked like someone had hammered the top button into the battery. Absolutely ridiculous. My friend and I were completely stunned that these things are as fragile as they are. They seemed to work fine, but they very clearly aren't durable AT ALL. Don't drop these things! They clearly have no internal structural reinforcement whatsoever.


Plugable 7-Port USB 3.0 SuperSpeed Hub with 20W Power Adapter (VIA VL812 Rev B2 Chipset with Latest v9091 Firmware. Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux support. Full USB 2.0 Backwards Compatibility.)
Plugable 7-Port USB 3.0 SuperSpeed Hub with 20W Power Adapter (VIA VL812 Rev B2 Chipset with Latest v9091 Firmware. Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux support. Full USB 2.0 Backwards Compatibility.)
Offered by Plugable Technologies
Price: $29.95

13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars PCB QA could use some work; electronic safety devices are missing..., September 3, 2013
Functionally, this is a good hub. The VL812 is one of the best, coming from the only company to currently have (as of this writing, anyway) a certified USB 3.0 KGH (Known-Good Hub). This may only mean something to you if you're into USB device certification. Anyway, the hub itself is pretty straight-forward. Internally, however, there are some things you may want to be aware of.

All of the through-hole parts are very light on solder. In fact, most of the through-hole mounts for the Type-A USB jacks are very anemic; the holes are not filled as they should be. Additionally, the differential pairs for all of the jacks are very light on solder, and although I didn't find any pins that were open, a few came very close (< .25mm). Most disturbing, however, is that I discovered that all 3 of the poly-fuses (F1, F2 and F3) had been replaced with 0-Ohm Resistors (direct shorts), removing any hope that poly-fuses would be available in-circuit to protect against any shorting that might occur on any given output. That means that you could potentially pull all 4 amps of power from the power supply through a single USB port, causing severe damage to the jack, the cable and whatever caused the short. This is particularly frustrating with this hub because even on the PCB, these parts are labeled as F1, F2 and F3, which means the manufacturer was just being cheap and decided to sacrifice safety for cost savings. I consider that offense alone worth 3 stars, if not more, especially after claiming this as a feature printed on the box. Poly-fuses acting as a safety devices serve a very valid purpose in this design, and getting rid of them to save 15 cents is lame, any way you cut it. The box states that the unit provides "USB overcurrent detection and protection", but this is very misleading since the 5V/4A power supply is now directly hard-wired to each of the 7 output ports, making that claim a lie (even if the controller detects a short or overcurrent condition, you can't cut the current to the affected port - all you can do is ASK the USB device to terminate the connection and hope that it stops). This is why poly-fuses are important safety devices. Very lame.

The Power Adapter is branded Plugable, Model SW-050400. The label claims a rating of 5V/4A. My testing showed that the supply can actually provide 6A with no significant jitter, and I was able to actually pull 7.15A before the supply shut down (hiccup, actually). So 5V/4A is a way-safe margin IF THIS WAS A USB 2.0 HUB. USB 2.0 rates a maximum of 500mA per port, times 7 ports = 3500mA (3.5A), however, this is a USB 3.0 hub, meaning each port has an enumerated max rating of 900mA per port, or 6300mA (6.3A) total. As a result, the included power supply is "technically" under-rated by the label, which claims a maximum of only 4 Amps. Again, however, my testing shows that the supply can reliably provide closer to 6 Amps without any apparent short-term issue, so you can probably load this hub to USB 3.0 maximum power spec without any problem. Just please keep in mind that the power supply included in your box may differ in performance from the one in my box. Also keep in mind that without Poly-Fuses in the output circuit, you could potentially pull 7 Amps of current through a single port, and that would most definitely cause catastrophic damage to the hub, the jack, the cable and possibly the attached peripheral as well. This also means that you could mistakenly plug-in an incorrect power supply into this hub (i.e. 12VDC), and the hub would do nothing to protect itself OR any of the attached devices - all of them would burn.

The electronics of the included 5V/4A power supply were "MEH", and although I wouldn't call it "high quality", nothing inside caused me to raise a red flag. As I mentioned earlier, the power supply will hiccup if overloaded (i.e., automatically reset and try to power-up if more current's being pulled than it can supply) at around 7 Amps.

Summary: Buyer beware.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 10, 2013 5:46 AM PDT


Mango Ginger Habanero Sauce
Mango Ginger Habanero Sauce
Offered by Fischer & Wieser Specialty Foods, Inc.
Price: $8.95

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Pure sugar! Nothing but sweeeeeeeet!!!! BLECH!, October 28, 2012
Three of us recently purchased a bottle of this sauce, looking for and expecting a Mango sauce base with a ginger and a habanero kick. Instead, we were punched in the face with probably some of the sweetest, most uninteresting and obnoxious sauce we've ever had the displeasure of tasting. One of my friends actually rinsed his mouth out after tasting a teaspoon of this stuff. At > $8 a bottle, we expected a heck of a lot more than 16oz of toxically-sweet goop. This stuff would make excellent ant poison, if you were to add just a little Borax to the mix... or perhaps hummingbird nectar, if diluted 1:100 with water. Seriously, though, we have no idea what these guys were thinking when they came up with this monstrosity. There's ZERO Mango, ZERO Ginger, and absolutely no Habanero anywhere to be found in this sauce. As naturally sweet as Mangoes are, it seems very strange to us that Fischer & Wieser felt the first ingredient in this sauce needed to be "sugar" - and boy, they weren't kidding.

This sauce was incredibly far off the mark. The rest of this so-called "handcrafted goodness" was dumped down the drain with a promise that we won't be making THAT mistake again.

Ingredients: Sugar, Sugar, Sugar, Sugar, Sugar, Mango (allegedly), Water (allegedly), Apple Cider Vinegar (allegedly), Honey, Ginger (allegedly), Red Pepper Flakes (allegedly), Habanero Pepper (yeah, right!!).


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