Your Garage Best Books of the Month Amazon Fashion Learn more nav_sap_plcc_ascpsc $5 Albums Fire TV Stick Subscribe & Save Patriotic Picks Shop-by-Room Amazon Cash Back Offer AnnedroidsS3 AnnedroidsS3 AnnedroidsS3  Amazon Echo  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Amazon Echo Introducing new colors All-New Kindle Oasis Segway miniPro
Profile for takingadayoff > Reviews

Browse

takingadayoff's Profile

Customer Reviews: 946
Top Reviewer Ranking: 446
Helpful Votes: 11951


Community Features
Review Discussion Boards
Top Reviewers

Guidelines: Learn more about the ins and outs of Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
takingadayoff "takingadayoff" RSS Feed (Las Vegas, Nevada)
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20
pixel
Outlast Temperature Regulating Sheet Set in White, Queen
Outlast Temperature Regulating Sheet Set in White, Queen
Offered by GuyGifter
Price: $131.01
6 used & new from $131.01

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Soft and Cool, June 23, 2016
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I like these sheets a lot. They are so soft and very light. Our current summer 110+ temps (even with air conditioning, we can only get the temp in the bedroom down to around 84 when it's that hot outside) keep us warmer than we'd prefer overnight and these are the coolest sheets we've tried. I can't vouch for the thermal regulating feature -- we both seem to be about the same as before. But I'm still quite happy with the sheets and although I normally try to find sheets on sale since they are so expensive, I will gladly pay a little extra to use Outlast. Be sure to wash them in cold water and dry at low temperature to keep them from shrinking and pilling.


White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America
White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America
by Nancy Isenberg
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $16.80
42 used & new from $16.80

149 of 158 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Snobs Among Us, June 21, 2016
White Trash is a massive social history of class in America, starting with the European settlers up to the present day. Despite the provocative title, it's not just about white people -- after all, the fact that there's a phrase that specifies color means the default must be not white, which is rather a disturbing thought. And it isn't so much about what life was like for poor people, it's about attitudes of the middle class and upper class toward working class and poor people. Again, the title says a lot about that.

My interest was more with 20th century than with the settlers and 18th and 19th century Americans. That's almost half the book and it is outstanding. Isenberg talks about eugenics and veterans and the Depression and war. The pop culture portrayals are fascinating and she goes into some depth about the movie Deliverance and about politics in the late 20th century.

It's all quite thought provoking, especially as the 2016 Presidential election plays out around us. Pundits and politicians are playing the class game but this time they have divided America into college graduates and those who have no degree. "Uneducated" voters or "poorly educated" voters are wreaking havoc on the race with their uninformed opinions.

It's an interesting and timely book, check it out.
Comment Comments (6) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 25, 2016 1:24 PM PDT


Housebroken: Admissions of an Untidy Life
Housebroken: Admissions of an Untidy Life
by Laurie Notaro
Edition: Paperback
Price: $12.03

5.0 out of 5 stars Best Yet, June 17, 2016
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
It's been a pleasure to read a new collection of Laurie Notaro essays every year or so, as she, um, "matured" doesn't seem to be quite the right word here. In the old days we saw her as a single girl willing to try a wide variety of recreational amusements, then as a newlywed adapting to married life, and now as an established and successful writer with twenty years of marriage under her belt.

Even though her experiments have shifted from dabbling in various pharmaceuticals to trying out different handicrafts, there's still an unpredictable quality to her experiences. Anything can happen and it's usually embarrassing or chaotic or both. Her adventures in Housebroken are often about people -- her neighbors, her family back in Arizona, and her husband. In fact, her husband is a major character in this collection rather than the bit player he's been in previous books.

Of course I enjoyed the tales of Notaro trying to clone Twinkies, teaching her nephew some basic life lessons, and the Kiss Cam Saga. But my favorite piece was the final essay in which she tells her twenty-five year old self a few things she wishes she had known back then. Come to think of it, "matured" is exactly the right word.


This Is Your Brain on Parasites: How Tiny Creatures Manipulate Our Behavior and Shape Society
This Is Your Brain on Parasites: How Tiny Creatures Manipulate Our Behavior and Shape Society
by Kathleen McAuliffe
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $25.65
51 used & new from $14.02

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Parasites Made Me Do It, May 21, 2016
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Simultaneously fascinating and disgusting, This is Your Brain on Parasites introduces a horrifying prospect -- that parasites (bacteria, worms, insects) could be changing the way we behave and think. It isn't revolting enough that they take up residence in and around our homes and bodies, there is evidence that they can be infecting our brains and changing our behavior to their benefit. It's a provocative theory, but some scientists have found evidence that it is not only true but quite widespread. It's not all bad, the probiotics in yogurt are very good for you, for instance. I have to warn you that if you are squeamish, as I am, the first few chapters are a rough ride. Still, it is so revolutionary and so amazing, that you just have to read through. If you have any doubts, read the article that made this book possible, How Your Cat is Making You Crazy. McAuliffe updates the article for this book and it gives you a taste of the subject and McAuliffe's style, which is reminiscent of Mary Roach.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 22, 2016 7:59 PM PDT


NYDJ Women's Barbara Boot Cut Jeans In Stretch Indigo Denim, Heyburn, 12
NYDJ Women's Barbara Boot Cut Jeans In Stretch Indigo Denim, Heyburn, 12
Price: $124.00

4.0 out of 5 stars Comfortable, flattering, but a bit too long, May 18, 2016
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
These jeans fit (almost) perfectly and feel great, launder with little shrinking. They look dressy enough to wear with heels, which brings me to the one thing I don't like about them -- they are too long. I normally wear a 31 or 32 inch length for wear with sneakers or other casual shoes, but these jeans need three or four inch heels. Or I can roll them up, which is what I will do since they are otherwise rather flattering, if I do say so.


Mother Tongue: My Family's Globe-Trotting Quest to Dream in Mandarin, Laugh in Arabic, and Sing  in Spanish
Mother Tongue: My Family's Globe-Trotting Quest to Dream in Mandarin, Laugh in Arabic, and Sing in Spanish
by Christine Gilbert
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $17.77
73 used & new from $6.08

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Watch Your Languages, May 17, 2016
Christine Gilbert and her husband decided to take their toddler to China, Lebanon, Mexico, and Spain to expose him to different languages and cultures while he was young enough to become fluent. It's a bit of a pipe dream, but it makes for a pretty good story. Both parents were freelancers (writing, film making) so they could work from anywhere there's an internet connection. Beijing was challenging, but pollution was what finally drove them to their next destination. Beirut was more to their liking, but daily car bombs and anti-American sentiment encouraged them to try elsewhere. Mexico was perfect and after Arabic and Mandarin, Spanish seemed like a breeze. They even had another child while they were there!

Christine Gilbert is a genial tour guide and she uses her documentary film background to research language learning and multilingualism. She read many books on the topic and interviewed some of the experts in the field and it's quite illuminating.


The Great Suppression: Voting Rights, Corporate Cash, and the Conservative Assault on Democracy
The Great Suppression: Voting Rights, Corporate Cash, and the Conservative Assault on Democracy
by Zachary Roth
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $20.16

0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Voting -- Not for Everyone?, May 16, 2016
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
How many ways is our democracy flawed? We've seen how the Electoral College makes the popular vote almost irrelevant, how the primary and caucus votes make a mockery of giving people a say in the choice of nominee, and how many people are shut out of the system altogether by restrictive "voters' rights" laws. In this short but jam-packed book, Roth describes how there is even a growing philosophy that questions the "right" to vote at all. Maybe, some say, voting should be harder, not easier. Maybe people should have to pass a test or somehow prove that they are worthy of voting. It's not all bad news -- there are movements to encourage people to vote, to help them register, to lower the voting age. Good thoughtful book that'll get you thinking about what's wrong and right about our system and how we can make it better.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 23, 2016 9:33 PM PDT


Writings on the Wall: Searching for a New Equality Beyond Black and White
Writings on the Wall: Searching for a New Equality Beyond Black and White
by Raymond Obstfeld
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $19.61

3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The View From Seven Feet Up, May 14, 2016
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Until recently I was unaware that Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was a writer. But it seems he has written several books for children and adults, as well as opinion columns for Time Magazine and others. And he has a lifelong interest in history. This new collection of essays about politics, racism, sexism, getting old, and more, is very opinionated, as you'd expect of essays, and well argued. I can't say if they are especially convincing, since I already agree with most of what he says, but they were fun to read as well as thought provoking. He often uses song lyrics and movie dialogue to punctuate his points and has a disarming style. The political essays are quite current -- he talks about Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders and has some interesting insight as to why people could support them. It's a short collection that you can read in small chunks or all in one gulp.


Devoured: From Chicken Wings to Kale Smoothies--How What We Eat Defines Who We Are
Devoured: From Chicken Wings to Kale Smoothies--How What We Eat Defines Who We Are
by Sophie Egan
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $19.63
66 used & new from $7.03

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Pac Man Nation (chomp, chomp, chomp), May 10, 2016
Covers a lot of the same ground as Pandora's Lunchbox, Salt Sugar Fat, The Dorito Effect, but if you enjoy those books, as I have, you'll like this one too. Sophie Egan has a conversational style and seems ready to try anything. A few of the topics in Devoured that I don't recall seeing in the other books of this type are "stunt foods" such as KFC's Double Down, and products that promote what they DON'T contain, such as gluten-free.


Jackson, 1964: And Other Dispatches from Fifty Years of Reporting on Race in America
Jackson, 1964: And Other Dispatches from Fifty Years of Reporting on Race in America
by Calvin Trillin
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $17.89

0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The More Things Change..., May 7, 2016
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Jackson, 1964 is a collection of articles that Calvin Trillin wrote for The New Yorker over the years on the topic of race. That makes it sound like some fifty years worth of reportage, but most of the articles are from the 60s and 70s, one article from the 80s, one from the 90s, and one from the 2000s. I'm a fan of Trillin, of The New Yorker, and of anthologies and collections. Somehow though, this volume didn't strike me as having much of a purpose. I think it would be interesting to read a collection of Civil Rights journalism from The New Yorker, or from other magazines, but limiting it to one reporter gives a somewhat narrow view. Perhaps I'm being too critical -- the articles are excellent and read individually are quite interesting as history and as a reminder of how much has changed and how much remains the same.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20