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Self-Coaching: The Powerful Program to Beat Anxiety and Depression, 2nd Edition, Completely Revised and Updated
Self-Coaching: The Powerful Program to Beat Anxiety and Depression, 2nd Edition, Completely Revised and Updated
by Joseph J. Luciani
Edition: Paperback
Price: $9.95
96 used & new from $3.61

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent self help, July 30, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I haven't written a review in a few years but felt compelled to do so in this case. A few months ago I started experiencing anxiety because of things happening at my job. I bought Dr. Luciani's book and found it very self-empowering and helpful. He explains how feelings of anxiety are based on insecurities, irrationalities and fears, and gives a clear method on how to couteract it. While I can't say that I'm completely over my anxiety, the book certainly helped and was easy to read and understand.

I also should mention that Dr. Luciani has a very fine web site where an entire lecture he gave is on line. Even more impressively, there is a forum where you can e-mail him your concern and he will e-mail you back the next day (I've corresponded with him in this manner twice). He obviously puts a lot of thought and effort into what he does, which is to attempt to eliminate anxiety and depression in people's loves.


The Day the War Ended: May 8, 1945 - Victory in Europe
The Day the War Ended: May 8, 1945 - Victory in Europe
by Martin Gilbert
Edition: Paperback
50 used & new from $2.44

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A collection of personal experiences, December 6, 2009
There are probably very few people who have ever lived who can write about World War II with the same authority that Martin Gilbert can. Here, he focuses on the individual, asking the question: what was it like when the war ended for you and what were your circumstances? For instance, a prisoner in a concentration camp had a far different experience at the "war's end" than did a family living in London. The book covers in detail the days leading to the surrender by the Nazi's and a few days thereafter (The surrender by the Japanese is only covered briefly). Gilbert, as always, brings to the forefront the horrors of the Nazi regime, and the collaboration of so many others in their plans to conquer Europe and wipe out the "degenerates," especially the Jews. When I read accounts of the Holocaust, the evilness never ceases to astonish me, nor the incomprehensible numbers involved. Gilbert also does a magnificant job bringing to light how the Nazis, in their final days, tried to cut a deal with the West to invade the Soviet Union, and how important it was to the West to make sure that Germany could never again wreak havoc on the World. Even as the Nazis were being utterly defeated, still it was important to them to kill prisoners.

A difficult subject to read, but well worth it. From the commentary, it was Gilbert's original intention to write more of a straight narrative, but since he was getting so much feed-back from people involved in the war, he decided to highlight the stories of individuals.


The Well and the Mine
The Well and the Mine
by Gin Phillips
Edition: Paperback
Price: $12.69
280 used & new from $0.01

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars poignant and deceivingly simplistic, December 6, 2009
This review is from: The Well and the Mine (Paperback)
For the first half of "The Well and the Mine," I thought I might be reading a book better targeted to the "Young Adult" reader. However, it soon became clear to me that the author's themes were quite complex and mature. Although sometimes the characters seemed a bit cookie-cutter to me (inquisitive younger sister, angelic innocent older sister, tough-as-nails dad but a softie at heart, etc.), I feel that Gin Phillips did a fine job evoking a particular time period while telling a compelling story about finding a dead baby in a well. I will definitely follow this author and read her next novel.


Suttree
Suttree
by Cormac McCarthy
Edition: Paperback
Price: $10.68
125 used & new from $2.39

3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Get out your Oxford dictionary., December 6, 2009
This review is from: Suttree (Paperback)
I say Oxford dictionary because the dictionary I usually rely on did not have a number of the words contained in "Sutree" which I not only did not know the meaning of but, often, did not even recognize. Look, I'll admit I need to look up maybe two or three words when I'm reading any typical novel. But a few times on every page? I'm pretty sure McCarthy simply made some of these words up. Still, this story of a moral intelligent drifter living a life of poverty near the bank of a river was compelling and memorable. McCarthy's goal is to portray a colorful cast of characters and, for the most part, he succeeds. The rawness of the conversational language seems even starker as compared to the flowery descriptive language, but sometimes it seems the author is simply showing off. However, McCarthy writes in an exceptionally unique voice.

I should also mention that some of the description of certain ethnicities, especially blacks, was borderline racist. I guess since we're talking about the great Cormac McCarthy though, I should give that a pass.
Comment Comments (6) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 2, 2010 7:06 AM PDT


Alive in Necropolis
Alive in Necropolis
by Doug Dorst
Edition: Hardcover
29 used & new from $1.58

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars (three and a half stars) A nice debut, September 26, 2009
This review is from: Alive in Necropolis (Hardcover)
"Alive in Necropolis" combines a small town story of relationships with the supernatural and, I believe, does so fairly effectively. The story flows nicely and keeps our interest even though it does get somewhat strange. I definitely think Doug Dorst has potential to be one of the better modern novelists assuming he keeps on writing. Too often, though, I've seen an author write an off-beat first novel like this one and then sort of disappear from the scene. Dorst can obviously tackle several different genres, so I would be disappointed if we don't hear from him again. In fact, it would be nice if someday Dorst writes a sequel to "Necropolis" with the same principle character, whom I found intriguing.


Hominids
Hominids
by Robert J. Sawyer
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: $7.19
196 used & new from $0.01

3.0 out of 5 stars three and half stars - a quick entertaining read, August 3, 2009
This review is from: Hominids (Mass Market Paperback)
Much more "fiction" than "science," "Hominids" is one of those breezy scifi books for which one needs to suspend belief and not demand too much sense from. (The concept of a "parallel universe" always runs into problems). Since I'm fascinated with Neanderthals, the story was fairly compelling for me, but you would learn alot more about these fascinating creatures by googling it and finding a scholarly article. The characters are cookie cutter (even in the Neanderthal world) and none of the concepts introduced are particularly thought through carefully. Nevertheless, for this genre "Hominids" isn't bad and I might even read the next two in the trilogy.


JBL Duet Speaker System for Portable Music and PC - White (Pair)
JBL Duet Speaker System for Portable Music and PC - White (Pair)

5.0 out of 5 stars Incredible value, July 2, 2009
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Until now, I've only rated books and cds, but I thought I would take time to express my opinion on this rather remarkable product. For thirty something bucks you get speakers with surprising crisp sound and high volume capacity. Attach it to your home or office computer, or directly to your portable cd player, ipod, etc. - anything that uses headphones - and you'll be astonished by the sound you get for such a cheap product. I bought two - one for home and one for the office.

About 30 years ago, I bought these huge speakers for $500 (huge speakers were all the rage at the time). Now I won't say that these speakers - which are less than one-tenth the size, weight and price - are as good, but they're not much worse either.

Highly recommended for listening to music through a computer or any sort of portable player, and it won't to put a dent in your wallet.


House of Cards: A Tale of Hubris and Wretched Excess on Wall Street
House of Cards: A Tale of Hubris and Wretched Excess on Wall Street
by William D. Cohan
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $19.10
318 used & new from $0.01

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Could have been better, June 28, 2009
"House of Cards," divided into three major sections, describes the last days of Bear Stearns and the decades leading up to it. The author attempts to convince the reader that the demise of Bear Stearns was caused by the big personalities who led the company and the recklessness by which they pursued Wall Street generated wealth. But, of course, the author was wrong: similar companies, that the author claimed were more solidly grounded, also ended up collapsing, and for the same reason: they all decided it was a good idea to rely on the myth that real estate values would keep rising and that mortgages given to individuals with credit risks, collateralized by this real estate, was a safe investment. Of course, we all know what happened.

In any event, "House of Cards" could have greatly benefitted from two features: first an appendix summarizing/defining the players involved, the financial tool being discussed, etc. I simply could not keep track of it all and really could have used this. In fact, I think the natural audience for this book is people who have worked in the financial industry. Second, I really can't understand why photographs of the major individuals weren't included. Jimmy Cayne, Ace Greenberg, etc, etc - it would have been nice to be able to accessibly visualize these people while reading. (Pictures also nicely give the reader a break from the narrative).

In fact, I think before one reads "House of Cards," one should look up some information of Bear Stearns and the principle characters involved. That will help the reader get through this sometimes overly challenging book. Then again, if one researches Bear Stearns on the internet, s/he probably doesn't need to read the book at all.


Decipher
Decipher
by Stel Pavlou
Edition: Paperback
Price: $15.45
165 used & new from $0.01

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Muddled and silly, June 28, 2009
This review is from: Decipher (Paperback)
"Decipher" is not a very good science fiction book, to put it simply. Some of the characters are virtually interchangeable and others worn out cliches (the tough edged military man; the beautiful sassy explorer). Each chapter ends off with some amazing fact or conclusion and old conspiracy-type theories are milked for all they're worth (Atlantis! Fabulous thousands year old technology! Mayan and Egyptian Symbolism!). Frankly, it all became so confusing and obtuse that early on, I just felt it wasn't worth the journey and I started to skim quite a bit. And, by the way, alot of the author's so-called incredible knowledge on esoteric facts had less basis than most Wikipedia entries.

I don't recommend "Decipher."


4:13 Dream
4:13 Dream
Price: $9.00
89 used & new from $0.12

10 of 14 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I'm sorry -- but it's awful, May 4, 2009
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: 4:13 Dream (Audio CD)
Ask me what my favorite band is and I'll answer without hesitation (and have been so saying for the past 15 or so years) "The Cure." "Disintegration" - one of my top ten favorite albums. Best concert of any band I've ever seen (I've been to at least a hundred starting from 1975) - The Cure last year at Madison Square Garden, NYC. But I regret to say that The Cure's music after "Bloodflowers" has been dreadful. And I don't say this lightly: even writing it is difficult. But it's the truth, and all of you devoted Cure fans know it. That doesn't mean I won't keep buying their albums as they release them, though they may be drek like these last two. But let's not try to pretend anymore: until he can prove differently, Robert Smith, while still a great performer of his old stuff, simply put, hasn't written a really good song since "Bloodflowers," or a truly great one since "Wish."

I'm sorry about the above, because I really love the band. Robert Smith is easily one of the most influential rock musicians of the last three decades, but not lately.
Comment Comments (6) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 21, 2010 11:48 AM PDT


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