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Helpful Votes: 99




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Pentalic Sketch Book, Hardbound, 8-1/2-Inch by 11-Inch
Pentalic Sketch Book, Hardbound, 8-1/2-Inch by 11-Inch
Price: $11.16
8 used & new from $9.65

32 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful for writing, November 3, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I use these as journals since I hate writing on lined sheets. The paper is heavy and smooth without being slick, so it takes a great line from my pen. The binding is sturdy but flexible enough not to have a deep gutter, so while the pages don't lie as flat as a spiral notebook can, they are still very usable and the whole thing is much more durable. I love this.

Mine did not have the California Prop 65 warning about which the previous reviewer complained. I really doubt this actually contains lead or whatever (the warning is often used to protect against litigation because it's far cheaper than maintaining lead-safe certification), but as I don't intend to EAT the book, I don't really care.

Love this book.


The Amy Vanderbilt Complete Book of Etiquette, 50th Anniversay Edition
The Amy Vanderbilt Complete Book of Etiquette, 50th Anniversay Edition
by Letitia Baldrige
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $27.26
248 used & new from $0.10

67 of 69 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A disappointment, but still an authority, October 13, 2003
My mother has a copy of the original edition, so I grew up treating Vanderbilt's work as a constant reference for social graces. Naturally, I was overjoyed to learn that a new edition had made an appearance. Unfortunately, I was disappointed.
With no disrespect intended to Tuckerman et al for their fine work, this once-great guide is a shadow of its former self. It is no less accurate than it once was, but is unfortunately much more base. Do people really need to be told not to leave dirty dishes lying about, for example?
As a guide to minimal civilized behaviour--how not to behave like a spoiled child--it carries the tradition of excellence. However, for the finer points of etiquette, I strongly recommend tracking down a copy of the 1978 (Baldrige ed.) edition of this great reference.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 2, 2012 2:17 PM PDT


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