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1940: FDR, Willkie, Lindbergh, Hitler—the Election amid the Storm
1940: FDR, Willkie, Lindbergh, Hitler—the Election amid the Storm
by Susan Dunn
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $30.00
82 used & new from $2.68

5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book, would recommend., February 16, 2014
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There is a lot of great books out there on Roosevelt-Willkie election of 1940. I was skeptical that this book would contribute anything to the vast amount of work already available out there however I was surprised. Dunn does an admirable job of praising Willkie for putting election year politics aside and uniting in the belief that the United States should show unwavering support to Great Britain in it's struggle against Nazi Germany.

She also doesn't spare any criticism of Charles Lindbergh, who it can never be pointed out enough was very naive and misguided in his support for Nazi Germany (not to mention he shared similar racial beliefs with Hitler). He doubted the ability of the greatest country in a potential war with Germany and for that he can't be forgiven.


FDR Goes to War: How Expanded Executive Power, Spiraling National Debt, and Restricted Civil Liberties Shaped Wartime America
FDR Goes to War: How Expanded Executive Power, Spiraling National Debt, and Restricted Civil Liberties Shaped Wartime America
by Burton W. Folsom
Edition: Hardcover
67 used & new from $0.01

13 of 25 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Burn your money instead, October 29, 2012
This book some how damns FDR as both a warmonger and as an ardent isolationist. Also expanding powers during a time of war is something that every US president has done but that obvious fact somehow escaped the author.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 3, 2014 9:23 AM PDT


New Deal or Raw Deal?: How FDR's Economic Legacy Has Damaged America
New Deal or Raw Deal?: How FDR's Economic Legacy Has Damaged America
by Burton W. Folsom
Edition: Paperback
Price: $11.60
121 used & new from $0.62

27 of 104 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Glenn Beck be damned, November 21, 2011
The lack of objectivity in this book is astounding and makes it difficult to read. This book is just typical of the mindless drivel that you can hear any day of the week by tuning into Rush, Hannity, etc. except substitute FDR for Obama or any Democrat for that matter. In fact if you want to save your time and money, I recommend just doing that.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 10, 2013 8:45 PM PDT


The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Civil War (The Politically Incorrect Guides)
The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Civil War (The Politically Incorrect Guides)
by H. W. Crocker
Edition: Paperback
Price: $13.63
61 used & new from $6.20

11 of 45 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Sour grapes from a pathetic wretch, September 13, 2011
150 years later, some people just can't except the fact that the South lost the war and have to make every excuse in the world as to why it happened and this author is no exception. This book was a gift and will otherwise make a good doorstop.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 6, 2015 12:48 PM PDT


Leading Men: The 50 Most Unforgettable Actors of the Studio Era
Leading Men: The 50 Most Unforgettable Actors of the Studio Era
by Frank Miller
Edition: Paperback
56 used & new from $0.70

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not a serious book but does the job., October 26, 2007
Published by TCM, this book aims at profiling the "50 most unforgettable actors of the studio era". The book is not meant to be a serious scholarly work. Move history buffs will find little new information revealed in this book. Instead we are given concise profiles of the leading men from Hollywood's golden era.

Each star gets about a page long blurb highlighting their careers, lives as well as their five most memorable pictures according to the editors. Each proflie also includes multiple pictures and several bits of interesting trivia related to each star.

The criticism of this book undoubtedly is who was left off the list. The books publishers acknowledge it would have been impossible to compile a list that would be completely satisfactory to everyone. I think they were spot on for the most part however I did disagree with some of their selections. Steve McQueen's heyday took place after the Studio Era. Harold Lloyd was an exceptional comedian but not a leading man in my opinion. James Dean is an icon however 3 films is too short of a career to include him on the list. Joel McCrea and Mickey Rooney were great actors but did not have as great careers as some of those left of the list. I thought Robert Montgomery, Fred MacMurray, Tony Curtis, Douglas Fairbanks Jr. and Joseph Cotten (who wasn't even mentioned in the honorable mention list) had stronger resumes and deserved recognition in this book.

But again, everyone will surely want to substitute at least a name or two on the list but I wouldn't let it stop you from purchasing this book.


Chancellorsville
Chancellorsville
by Stephen W. Sears
Edition: Paperback
Price: $11.72
100 used & new from $0.77

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Debunking some myths of the battle, October 17, 2007
This review is from: Chancellorsville (Paperback)
Steven Sears' book is a well detailed account of the events surrounding the Union and Confederacy in early 1863, culminating in the battle of Chancellorsville in May of that same year.

Most historians would argue that until Ulysses S. Grant came from out West in 1864 to prod George Meade, the Army of the Potomac was led by a series of promising but ultimately inept battlefield generals. Following the infamous "Mud March" in January of '63 president Lincoln, despite reservations, replaced the incompetent Ambrose Burnside with Joseph Hooker. Inadvertently nicknamed "Fighting Joe" by a reporter, Sears points out that there could not have been a more appropriate nickname for the general. Sears details how Hooker set about to restore the morale that had been sorely lacking in the Union Army following the defeat at Fredricksburg in the previous December. Within a couple months of his appointment, Hooker had cut desertion rates dramatically and inspired a sense of pride that was long missing in the Army of the Potomac.

With most of Longstreet's Corps detached from the Army of Northern Virginia and a number of Union regiment's service set to expire within weeks, Hooker decided to begin his offensive in early May. Sears argues that Hooker made one of the most successful feats of the War, when he managed to cross his army of over 100,000 men over the Rappahannock and maneuver into the rear of the Lee's army without a shot being fired. Despite the promising start for Hooker, what followed as Sears points out was some less then stellar decisions made on the Union side, some bad luck, and a series of bold moves by Robert E. Lee. The battle would end with yet another Union offensive on Richmond being halted in it's tracks by Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia.

Most emphatically, Sears dispels the notion that the battle was lost mainly because Hooker "lost his nerve". Sears rightfully points out that the battle was lost mainly because of the actions of 3 Union generals, Sedgwick, Stoneman and Howard, a concussion that knocked Hooker out of commission during crucial moments of the 2nd day's battle and most importantly the daring actions of Robert E. Lee. Sears points out that Lee simply "outgeneraled" Hooker and in that respect he wasn't alone.

The book argues that the outcome of the battle wasn't the resounding Confederate victory that some would lead us to believe. The disparity in casualties wasn't vast, with the Confederates actually suffering more dead, and Lee losing perhaps his best lieutenant in Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson. The Union army while certainly on the losing end wasn't necessarily demoralized like in their previous battle.

Overall, I would consider this the definitive book on the Chancellorsville campaign and would recommend it to all Civil War buffs out there.


The Genius of the System: Hollywood Filmmaking in the Studio Era
The Genius of the System: Hollywood Filmmaking in the Studio Era
by Thomas Schatz
Edition: Paperback
Price: $30.00
94 used & new from $0.01

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must for anyone interested in hollywoods's golden age, March 7, 2005
Thomas Schatz argues in this brilliantly detailed book that even more remarkable then the motion pictures Hollywood produced from the early 20's through about the end of the 40's, was the detailed process of how Hollywood was able to churn out these quality films on a routine basis.

Schatz does a remarkable job of diagraming the rise of the studio system in Hollywood. The book is remarkably easy to follow (compared to any of Andrew Sarris's works) and includes numerous photographs. He focuses most on the trials and tribulations of Universal Studios, Warner Bros. and MGM and their distinct, integrated studio styles (RKO is mentioned to a lesser extent as well).

Producers Irving Thalberg, David O. Selznick, Daryl Zanuck and director Alfred Hitchcock are featured prominently and rightfully so. Also, includes many of the behind the scene battles between studios and directors/producers.

There are some minor criticisms though. He almost completely ignores Paramount and Colombia Pictures. Paramount was as much a factory set-up as MGM and deserves more attention. And the decline of the studio system is sparse compared to the rise of. But aside from that, this book is an enjoyable read and recommend it to anyone who is fascinated with early Hollywood.


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