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The Wright Brothers (text only) by R. Freedman,W. Wright,O. Wright
The Wright Brothers (text only) by R. Freedman,W. Wright,O. Wright
by W. Wright,O. Wright R. Freedman
Edition: Paperback
20 used & new from $7.50

5.0 out of 5 stars How They Invented the Aeroplane, July 16, 2016
The Wright Brothers

The airplane was the first major invention to be fully documented by photography. This book contains original photographs taken by the Wright Brothers. They solved the problems of controlling a heavier-than-air flying machine. They learned by doing not from formal schooling. Their father encouraged them in hard work, resolve, and determination (Chapter 2). They published a local weekly newspaper, then worked as job printers. They adopted the bicycle craze. They built, sold, and repaired bicycles. Bicycles allowed a person to travel freely and without using trains or trolleys, and this led to the automobile. Others were involved with flying experiments (Chapter 3).

Some of the problems of a heavier-than-air flying machine were solved, except for control (Chapter 4). The Wright Bros. watched birds adjust their wings to turn and invented “wing-warping” to do the same. Their new 1901 glider did not perform as well as its predecessor. Since the published data was inaccurate they conducted tests with a wind tunnel to measure wings (Chapter 5). A problem in flight was solved with a movable tail connected to the wing-warping wires. This three-dimensional aircraft control system is in use today (p.64). There was no gasoline engine that met their requirements so they built their own (Chapter 6). They used two propellers rotating in opposite directions to neutralize torque. They tested their Flyer in December 1903. It was the first time a machine carrying a man flew into the air and landed at a point as high as where it started (p.76).

The Wright Bros. built a new flyer with a stronger body and a more powerful motor so they could test it at home in Dayton Ohio (Chapter 7). A catapult gave enough speed for lift-off. It was the world’s first truly practical airplane (p.85). Next they applied for patents to secure their invention (Chapter 8). The US Signal Corps gave them a contract in 1908. Wilbur went to France to demonstrate their flying machine. Orville demonstrated one in Fort Myer, Virginia (Chapter 9). The Wright Bros. were honored and cheered in Europe and back in America. Wilbur flew along the Hudson by New York city. They continued to improve their Flyer (Chapter 10). A Wright Flyer flew from Long Island New York to Long Beach California in 84 days (p.113). Wilbur died of typhoid, a common disease in 1912. Orville sold his interest in the Wright Company and retired. The airplane quickly went from a novelty to a necessity (p.116).

This book provides an overview of the development of the aeroplane by the Wright Brothers. There is a list of books for further reading (pp.123-124). This book barely mentions the “prolonged lawsuits against rival inventors” (p.110). The investors behind the Wright Brothers sought overly broad patents to eliminate the competition. Glenn Curtiss invented the movable aileron which was better that wing-warping; but a lawsuit said the Wright Brothers’ patents covered this.


Wright Brothers
Wright Brothers
by Russell Freedman
Edition: Library Binding

5.0 out of 5 stars How They Invented the Aeroplane, July 16, 2016
This review is from: Wright Brothers (Library Binding)
The Wright Brothers

The airplane was the first major invention to be fully documented by photography. This book contains original photographs taken by the Wright Brothers. They solved the problems of controlling a heavier-than-air flying machine. They learned by doing not from formal schooling. Their father encouraged them in hard work, resolve, and determination (Chapter 2). They published a local weekly newspaper, then worked as job printers. They adopted the bicycle craze. They built, sold, and repaired bicycles. Bicycles allowed a person to travel freely and without using trains or trolleys, and this led to the automobile. Others were involved with flying experiments (Chapter 3).

Some of the problems of a heavier-than-air flying machine were solved, except for control (Chapter 4). The Wright Bros. watched birds adjust their wings to turn and invented “wing-warping” to do the same. Their new 1901 glider did not perform as well as its predecessor. Since the published data was inaccurate they conducted tests with a wind tunnel to measure wings (Chapter 5). A problem in flight was solved with a movable tail connected to the wing-warping wires. This three-dimensional aircraft control system is in use today (p.64). There was no gasoline engine that met their requirements so they built their own (Chapter 6). They used two propellers rotating in opposite directions to neutralize torque. They tested their Flyer in December 1903. It was the first time a machine carrying a man flew into the air and landed at a point as high as where it started (p.76).

The Wright Bros. built a new flyer with a stronger body and a more powerful motor so they could test it at home in Dayton Ohio (Chapter 7). A catapult gave enough speed for lift-off. It was the world’s first truly practical airplane (p.85). Next they applied for patents to secure their invention (Chapter 8). The US Signal Corps gave them a contract in 1908. Wilbur went to France to demonstrate their flying machine. Orville demonstrated one in Fort Myer, Virginia (Chapter 9). The Wright Bros. were honored and cheered in Europe and back in America. Wilbur flew along the Hudson by New York city. They continued to improve their Flyer (Chapter 10). A Wright Flyer flew from Long Island New York to Long Beach California in 84 days (p.113). Wilbur died of typhoid, a common disease in 1912. Orville sold his interest in the Wright Company and retired. The airplane quickly went from a novelty to a necessity (p.116).

This book provides an overview of the development of the aeroplane by the Wright Brothers. There is a list of books for further reading (pp.123-124). This book barely mentions the “prolonged lawsuits against rival inventors” (p.110). The investors behind the Wright Brothers sought overly broad patents to eliminate the competition. Glenn Curtiss invented the movable aileron which was better that wing-warping; but a lawsuit said the Wright Brothers’ patents covered this.


Compromised: Clinton, Bush and the CIA by Terry Reed (1995-09-01)
Compromised: Clinton, Bush and the CIA by Terry Reed (1995-09-01)
by Terry Reed; John Cummings;
Edition: Hardcover
6 used & new from $50.87

4.0 out of 5 stars Follow the Money, July 14, 2016
Compromised

Terry Kent Reed joined the Air Force while in college. He soon learned that "the government and the military had to deceive the American public to accomplish its national security objectives" (p.18)! The CIA relied extensively upon Air America to conduct their unstated objectives (p.20). What happened to our MIAs? POW camps were bombed by the Air Force (p.22)! The newspapers and government lied about Southeast Asia (p.23). After leaving the Air Force TKR got a commercial pilot's license and worked as a salesman in the machine industry. TKR became an asset for the FBI, then the CIA, on international sales. In 1983 he began to work for the CIA. "Insurance losses" would be used to raise untraceable funds (p.43). What happened to those old traditional values (p.14)?

A NJ arms company was bought and shipped to Arkansas to build receiver housings that converted a civilian AR-15 to a military M-16, and had no tracable serial number. The Rose Law Firm's specialty was brokering deals (p.55). Governor Bill Clinton was disliked because of his attempts to attract out-of-state businesses, and for trying to improve the state educational system (p.56). Page 86 explains how stolen aircraft are laundered if you have Government connections. Mena airport specialized in illegal modifications to aircraft. Barry Seal was used by the Reagan Administration, then thrown away (pp.97-98). Payoffs were made to Arkansas state officials (p.125). The CIA is above the law (p.133). Pages 212-4 tell how the Arkansas governor's friends and relatives were dirtied-up. Does the CIA decide who will become President (pp.231-6)? The BCCI and First American Bank were used by Arkansas banking (p.245). When dirty money is deposited in the Netherlands Antilles, it can be laundered and taxes avoided (p.249). Things went well for TKR until a C-123 was shot down (pp.289-90).

The Mexican Enterprise began Phase 2. The elite of Mexico, like in Arkansas, opposed any change unless they personally benefited. They suppressed any attempt to empower a middle class(p.330). Then TKR discovered his business was being used to ship pure cocaine to the States; the US Govt. was the biggest cocaine smuggler (p.343)! What powerful men owed their fortune to CIA drug traffic (p.346)? Was the crew on that downed C-123 killed before the crash (p.356)? Page 390 tells how a false crime can be created to destroy the credibility of a witness. The Reeds went underground with hidden identities, and traveled the country.

After the case went to trial, the judge declared Terry Reed not guilty due to a lack of evidence (p.459). This kept the story of drug trafficking hidden from the public. The Reeds tried to sue for their false prosecution, but no lawyer would take their case after the judgment against the Christic Institute (p.470). A famous legal expert took their case on contingency. Page 502 tells of the smear story created by 'TIME' magazine. Iran-Contra was not an issue in the 1992 election because both Bush and Clinton were involved! Terry Reed discovered the CIA counsel was now Attorney-General!

The Epilogue claims the Department of Justice perverted itself under Reagan, Bush, and Clinton. I think Bush picked Clinton as an opponent because Clinton would not prosecute Bush for drug trafficking; then Bush Jr to continue the cover-up. Congress failed to expose Iran-Contra (p.545) because of a pay-off. (Like the Senate failure to impeach Clinton?) The book ends by asking why Barry Seal was bumped off. Did he threaten very powerful people with exposure? Page 240 tells how dirty drug money ended up in Attorney-General Meese's personal bank account. Do these 'Black Operation' flights still continue?


Compromised: Clinton, Bush and the CIA by Terry Reed (1994-02-01)
Compromised: Clinton, Bush and the CIA by Terry Reed (1994-02-01)
2 used & new from $150.41

4.0 out of 5 stars Follow the Money, July 14, 2016
Compromised

Terry Kent Reed joined the Air Force while in college. He soon learned that "the government and the military had to deceive the American public to accomplish its national security objectives" (p.18)! The CIA relied extensively upon Air America to conduct their unstated objectives (p.20). What happened to our MIAs? POW camps were bombed by the Air Force (p.22)! The newspapers and government lied about Southeast Asia (p.23). After leaving the Air Force TKR got a commercial pilot's license and worked as a salesman in the machine industry. TKR became an asset for the FBI, then the CIA, on international sales. In 1983 he began to work for the CIA. "Insurance losses" would be used to raise untraceable funds (p.43). What happened to those old traditional values (p.14)?

A NJ arms company was bought and shipped to Arkansas to build receiver housings that converted a civilian AR-15 to a military M-16, and had no tracable serial number. The Rose Law Firm's specialty was brokering deals (p.55). Governor Bill Clinton was disliked because of his attempts to attract out-of-state businesses, and for trying to improve the state educational system (p.56). Page 86 explains how stolen aircraft are laundered if you have Government connections. Mena airport specialized in illegal modifications to aircraft. Barry Seal was used by the Reagan Administration, then thrown away (pp.97-98). Payoffs were made to Arkansas state officials (p.125). The CIA is above the law (p.133). Pages 212-4 tell how the Arkansas governor's friends and relatives were dirtied-up. Does the CIA decide who will become President (pp.231-6)? The BCCI and First American Bank were used by Arkansas banking (p.245). When dirty money is deposited in the Netherlands Antilles, it can be laundered and taxes avoided (p.249). Things went well for TKR until a C-123 was shot down (pp.289-90).

The Mexican Enterprise began Phase 2. The elite of Mexico, like in Arkansas, opposed any change unless they personally benefited. They suppressed any attempt to empower a middle class(p.330). Then TKR discovered his business was being used to ship pure cocaine to the States; the US Govt. was the biggest cocaine smuggler (p.343)! What powerful men owed their fortune to CIA drug traffic (p.346)? Was the crew on that downed C-123 killed before the crash (p.356)? Page 390 tells how a false crime can be created to destroy the credibility of a witness. The Reeds went underground with hidden identities, and traveled the country.

After the case went to trial, the judge declared Terry Reed not guilty due to a lack of evidence (p.459). This kept the story of drug trafficking hidden from the public. The Reeds tried to sue for their false prosecution, but no lawyer would take their case after the judgment against the Christic Institute (p.470). A famous legal expert took their case on contingency. Page 502 tells of the smear story created by 'TIME' magazine. Iran-Contra was not an issue in the 1992 election because both Bush and Clinton were involved! Terry Reed discovered the CIA counsel was now Attorney-General!

The Epilogue claims the Department of Justice perverted itself under Reagan, Bush, and Clinton. I think Bush picked Clinton as an opponent because Clinton would not prosecute Bush for drug trafficking; then Bush Jr to continue the cover-up. Congress failed to expose Iran-Contra (p.545) because of a pay-off. (Like the Senate failure to impeach Clinton?) The book ends by asking why Barry Seal was bumped off. Did he threaten very powerful people with exposure? Page 240 tells how dirty drug money ended up in Attorney-General Meese's personal bank account. Do these 'Black Operation' flights still continue?


Who Killed Sir Harry Oakes? by James Leasor (2001-01-01)
Who Killed Sir Harry Oakes? by James Leasor (2001-01-01)
by James Leasor
Edition: Paperback
7 used & new from $66.41

4.0 out of 5 stars A Most Scandalous History, July 14, 2016
Who Killed Sir Harry Oakes?

The 'Foreword" provides a summary. Sir Harry Oakes became one of the richest men in the world by discovering gold in Ontario. He did not inherit his fortune, or make it by exploiting any person, company, or country. His gruff crude manner masked his erudition. This book lacks an index and a table of contents. Chapter 1 tells the history of Sir Harry Oakes and Alfred de Marigny to 1943. After Sir Harry Oakes' strange death, de Marigny was arrested for the murder. The prison doctor who examined de Marigny saw "no marks of any burns" (p.25), and was immediately dismissed! Barker and Melchen poisoned Lady Oakes' mind against de Marigny (p.26). Nancy remained loyal to her husband. The most damning evidence against de Marigny was his fingerprint at the murder scene (p.29). When the Commissioner of Police could testify to de Marigny's presence earlier that day, the Commissioner was transferred far away to prevent this testimony (p.29)! De Marigny's driver was beaten to try to make him testify against de Marigny! The two watchmen on duty the night of the murder disappeared (p.31). Nancy hired Raymond Schindler, the famous private detective (p.30). A very powerful person was trying to murder an innocent victim (p.32).

Many of the witnesses that testified were not present at the time of the murder. What some witnesses claimed to know did not match what they really knew (p.35). Harold Christie was very ill at ease in the witness box, and sweated profusely as if terrified (p.39). Captain Melchen did not know of the fingerprint until the funeral (p.51). This fingerprint was not photographed in situ, but lifted. It did not show the background, unlike the example given in court (p.66). Chapter 5 tells about the Normandie fire, and suggests this sabotage was part of a scheme. The Federal Government would ally with Organized Crime. Page 90 offers and explanation of this arson; page 91 explains the death of a witness. The story of the racket in 'Engine Parts' is on page 102. Chapter 6 gives the biography of Harold Christie, a visionary businessman who was self-made. Did de Marigny remind the Duke of a former boyfriend of the Duchess (p.116)? The House of Assembly first considered how any development helped them (p.118). Captain H. Montgomery Hyde found lax security in the Bahamas (pp.130-134). The very rich could buy anything in the world, except happiness for their children (p.136). One threat of Axel Wenner-Gren was as a competitor to US investors in Mexico (p.142). Sir Harry Oakes preferred gold over paper money (p.144). Could he have been the inspiration for "Goldfinger"?

James Leasor used his writing skills to fill in the unknown parts of this story. It relates Sir Harry Oakes' murder to a bigger picture. De Marigny's 'not guilty' verdict was met with popular approval (p.219). The 'Epilogue' tells of subsequent events. The DEA estimates that 80% of the drugs smuggled into the US come through the Bahamas. Their profits are laundered through the many banks there. The Playboy Casino was constructed on the site of Sir Harry Oakes' house (p.246). Independence for the Bahamas was followed by a loss of safety and personal security. But don't other gambling locales also attract criminals?


Southward Ho (1939) by Roy Rogers
Southward Ho (1939) by Roy Rogers
DVD ~ Roy Rogers;Mary Hart;George Hayes

4.0 out of 5 stars A Story about Law and Order, July 11, 2016
Southward Ho!, 1934 film

The film shows soldiers roasting a chicken. They chase a dispatch rider, and lost the chicken. The comic scene is followed by a song. The war is over, so its back to Texas for inherited property. Why is the ranch losing money? Who is the co-owner? Can they cooperate? "You're dern tootin'." The Colonel was appointed Military Governor of the district, he will maintain law and order. What kind of troops will he get? Tax collection is needed to run the government. The troops must act properly. No receipt? There is drama in seizing property for taxes. Can they organize a resistance? "They went that way." The search continues for the girl. Roy sings another song for entertainment.

The Colonel and his men find the cabin. Ellen can't tell. Threats are exchanged. Roy tells Denby the truth. Will there be a duel? [There is comic treatment of a gunfight, a parody of some other westerns.] Is there a lone gunman with a rifle? The military will confiscate arms (for easier oppression of the people). Will taxation be halted until the investigation? The unarmed people are easy prey for Jeffries' men. Public meetings are banned. There is another song. There is a plot to recover their arms, it works. The people defend themselves against their oppressors. There will be a happy ending for Ellen and Roy.

There is a political lesson in this western about authority, freedom, and the right to keep and bear arms. After the Great Cowboy Strike of 1883 the Big Landowners sought gun control to oppress their hired hands. This is not in schoolbook textbooks.


Southward Ho! by Roy Rogers
Southward Ho! by Roy Rogers
DVD ~ Roy Rogers;George "Gabby" Hayes;Lynne Roberts;Mary Hart;Wade Boteler

4.0 out of 5 stars A Story about Law and Order, July 11, 2016
This review is from: Southward Ho! by Roy Rogers (DVD)
Southward Ho!, 1934 film

The film shows soldiers roasting a chicken. They chase a dispatch rider, and lost the chicken. The comic scene is followed by a song. The war is over, so its back to Texas for inherited property. Why is the ranch losing money? Who is the co-owner? Can they cooperate? "You're dern tootin'." The Colonel was appointed Military Governor of the district, he will maintain law and order. What kind of troops will he get? Tax collection is needed to run the government. The troops must act properly. No receipt? There is drama in seizing property for taxes. Can they organize a resistance? "They went that way." The search continues for the girl. Roy sings another song for entertainment.

The Colonel and his men find the cabin. Ellen can't tell. Threats are exchanged. Roy tells Denby the truth. Will there be a duel? [There is comic treatment of a gunfight, a parody of some other westerns.] Is there a lone gunman with a rifle? The military will confiscate arms (for easier oppression of the people). Will taxation be halted until the investigation? The unarmed people are easy prey for Jeffries' men. Public meetings are banned. There is another song. There is a plot to recover their arms, it works. The people defend themselves against their oppressors. There will be a happy ending for Ellen and Roy.

There is a political lesson in this western about authority, freedom, and the right to keep and bear arms. After the Great Cowboy Strike of 1883 the Big Landowners sought gun control to oppress their hired hands. This is not in schoolbook textbooks.


Southward Ho!
Southward Ho!
DVD ~ George ""Gabby"" Hayes,Lynne Roberts(aka Mary Hart), Wade Boteler, Arthur Loft Roy Rogers
Price: $9.98
6 used & new from $7.38

4.0 out of 5 stars A Story about Law and Order, July 11, 2016
This review is from: Southward Ho! (DVD)
Southward Ho!, 1934 film

The film shows soldiers roasting a chicken. They chase a dispatch rider, and lost the chicken. The comic scene is followed by a song. The war is over, so its back to Texas for inherited property. Why is the ranch losing money? Who is the co-owner? Can they cooperate? "You're dern tootin'." The Colonel was appointed Military Governor of the district, he will maintain law and order. What kind of troops will he get? Tax collection is needed to run the government. The troops must act properly. No receipt? There is drama in seizing property for taxes. Can they organize a resistance? "They went that way." The search continues for the girl. Roy sings another song for entertainment.

The Colonel and his men find the cabin. Ellen can't tell. Threats are exchanged. Roy tells Denby the truth. Will there be a duel? [There is comic treatment of a gunfight, a parody of some other westerns.] Is there a lone gunman with a rifle? The military will confiscate arms (for easier oppression of the people). Will taxation be halted until the investigation? The unarmed people are easy prey for Jeffries' men. Public meetings are banned. There is another song. There is a plot to recover their arms, it works. The people defend themselves against their oppressors. There will be a happy ending for Ellen and Roy.

There is a political lesson in this western about authority, freedom, and the right to keep and bear arms. After the Great Cowboy Strike of 1883 the Big Landowners sought gun control to oppress their hired hands. This is not in schoolbook textbooks.


Frontier Pony Express by Roy Rogers
Frontier Pony Express by Roy Rogers
DVD ~ Roy Rogers;Lynne Roberts;Raymond Hatton;Noble Johnson;Edward Keane

4.0 out of 5 stars Saving California for the Union, July 11, 2016
Frontier Pony Express, 1939 film

In 1861 northern leaders controlled California with its gold vital to victory. The ‘Pony Express’ carried mail from Missouri to California. Riders carried mail from one relay station to another, armed with only a revolver and a fast horse. They changed horses at relay stations. A Senator will arrive at St. Joe; he is a southern sympathizer. Roy stops a runaway stagecoach. A man opens a frontier newspaper. It is part of a plan to capture California for the Confederacy by sending phony dispatches to the Army in California. Roy dines with that newspaper editor, who offers him a way to earn more money. There is an argument and gunfire; the editor drew first but lost.

Talk in a saloon tells about the gold shipment. Later men attack this shipment and steal the gold. A man stops a woman but Roy rescues her. They hear the pony payroll was stolen! Their pay was lost. They know who did it, but can’t prove it. Word gets loose about important Army dispatches. That Senator plans to use Luke Johnson’s gang to capture the Pony Express mail; he explains why. There is a dance, men must surrender their guns. Roy sings about “rusty spurs”. There is a raid on the Pony Express office! Gunfire drives away the Confederate raiders. Brad is an agent for the Confederate Secret Service! Roy’s admission caused the raid, lives were lost. Miss Ann Langhorn is taken in for questioning, she will be tried.

Roy is transferred to Laramie. There is a plot to steal vouchers for gold. Langhorn learns about Lassiter’s plot and tells Ann about it. One rider was wounded but arrives with the mail. Roy will carry it to St. Joe, his fresh horse allows an escape from raiders. There is another ambush at a relay station, but Roy gets away. So too Trigger. Will they reach St. Joe safely? Yes, Army Cavalry meets the rider. The pursuers become the pursued. Luke Johnson escapes, but Roy captures him. Horseshoe arrived with Trigger. Miss Ann Langhorn is placed in Roy’s custody.

This is an interesting story about the conflicts of the Civil War in the West. It is not a history, but symbolizes history. One lesson is to not talk about confidential business information in a public place, or even to those who don’t have a need to know. “Loose lips sink ships.” Note the use of guns from the late 19th century in a story set around 1861. Its drama, not history. Did the Pony Express riders use that kind of saddle or a lighter one like those used by jockeys in horse races? The United States unit of currency was the eagle; a double eagle was a gold coin worth $20. In 1971 Nixon abolished this standard and all currency greater than the $100 bill. You will see old novels and movies that reference a $1,000 bill (“The Maltese Falcon”). In the late 1930's $10 was the minimum wage for a week’s work (25 cents an hour).


Frontier Pony Express
Frontier Pony Express
DVD ~ Roy Rogers
Price: $5.98
25 used & new from $0.01

4.0 out of 5 stars Saving California for the Union, July 11, 2016
This review is from: Frontier Pony Express (DVD)
Frontier Pony Express, 1939 film

In 1861 northern leaders controlled California with its gold vital to victory. The ‘Pony Express’ carried mail from Missouri to California. Riders carried mail from one relay station to another, armed with only a revolver and a fast horse. They changed horses at relay stations. A Senator will arrive at St. Joe; he is a southern sympathizer. Roy stops a runaway stagecoach. A man opens a frontier newspaper. It is part of a plan to capture California for the Confederacy by sending phony dispatches to the Army in California. Roy dines with that newspaper editor, who offers him a way to earn more money. There is an argument and gunfire; the editor drew first but lost.

Talk in a saloon tells about the gold shipment. Later men attack this shipment and steal the gold. A man stops a woman but Roy rescues her. They hear the pony payroll was stolen! Their pay was lost. They know who did it, but can’t prove it. Word gets loose about important Army dispatches. That Senator plans to use Luke Johnson’s gang to capture the Pony Express mail; he explains why. There is a dance, men must surrender their guns. Roy sings about “rusty spurs”. There is a raid on the Pony Express office! Gunfire drives away the Confederate raiders. Brad is an agent for the Confederate Secret Service! Roy’s admission caused the raid, lives were lost. Miss Ann Langhorn is taken in for questioning, she will be tried.

Roy is transferred to Laramie. There is a plot to steal vouchers for gold. Langhorn learns about Lassiter’s plot and tells Ann about it. One rider was wounded but arrives with the mail. Roy will carry it to St. Joe, his fresh horse allows an escape from raiders. There is another ambush at a relay station, but Roy gets away. So too Trigger. Will they reach St. Joe safely? Yes, Army Cavalry meets the rider. The pursuers become the pursued. Luke Johnson escapes, but Roy captures him. Horseshoe arrived with Trigger. Miss Ann Langhorn is placed in Roy’s custody.

This is an interesting story about the conflicts of the Civil War in the West. It is not a history, but symbolizes history. One lesson is to not talk about confidential business information in a public place, or even to those who don’t have a need to know. “Loose lips sink ships.” Note the use of guns from the late 19th century in a story set around 1861. Its drama, not history. Did the Pony Express riders use that kind of saddle or a lighter one like those used by jockeys in horse races? The United States unit of currency was the eagle; a double eagle was a gold coin worth $20. In 1971 Nixon abolished this standard and all currency greater than the $100 bill. You will see old novels and movies that reference a $1,000 bill (“The Maltese Falcon”). In the late 1930's $10 was the minimum wage for a week’s work (25 cents an hour).


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