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Orthofeet Men's Bismarck Black Fashion Loafers 11 W
Orthofeet Men's Bismarck Black Fashion Loafers 11 W
Offered by OutdoorEquipped
Price: $97.75
5 used & new from $97.75

4.0 out of 5 stars OK, June 20, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Arrived on the last allowable day set by Amazon. Shoes are so-so but that's not necessarily the vendor's fault. My shoe requirements are not quite normal, and I have problems getting ones that fit properly.


Botony 500 - Mens Long Sleeve Broadcloth Pajama, Blue 29635-Large
Botony 500 - Mens Long Sleeve Broadcloth Pajama, Blue 29635-Large

1.0 out of 5 stars These PJs weren't made for me., November 4, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
First of all, all my clothing, including pajamas, are size large. They fit me just fine. This pair of pajamas was too tight in the chest; the arms were too short; the pants fit, but I've seen better; light weight providing limited warmth. You'll notice that I used the words "was", and "were". Those are the right words as the set is now residing in our garbage can. Included in this particular Amazon order was another set of PJs, brand name "Noble Mount" (my wife looked askance at me, and then laughed when I told her the name). These pajamas were also "large" and fit perfectly. While also light weight they provide warmth for a cold night.

In short, you can do a lot better than buy these Botany PJ's. The brand name isn't even spelled correctly in this listing. A real dud.


Ulysses (The Gabler Edition)
Ulysses (The Gabler Edition)
by James Joyce
Edition: Paperback
Price: $15.89
164 used & new from $0.46

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One Excellent Reason to Buy The Gabler Edition, January 12, 2013
One can dispute various things regarding the Gabler edition of Ulysses, but, for me, there was one compelling reason to purchase it.

If a reader wishes to purchase one or more books that discuss and/or annotate Ulysses, then this, the Gabler edition of Ulysses, should be given prime consideration. Many of these supplementary books are line coded to the Gabler addition, such as:

1. Ulysses Annotated by Don Gifford. This is a large book that annotates almost everything in Ulysses.
2. Ulysses Revised Edition by Hugh Kenner. Another book of annotations.
3, Reading Joyce's Ulysses by Daniel Schwarz.
4. New Bloomsday Book, by Harry Blamires. Line coded to Gabler, but also has line codes for 1961 Random House and 1992 Penguin.
5. Ulysses and Us by Declan Kiberd is an exception as it refers to the 1992 Penguin version of Ulysses. But this book doesn't use line codes.

I own all of the above books (+James Joyce and Ulysses by Stuart Gilbert, and am grateful that I bought Gabler.


580 Color Paintings of Paul Cezanne (Cézanne) - French Post-Impressionist Painter (January 19, 1839 - October 22, 1906)
580 Color Paintings of Paul Cezanne (Cézanne) - French Post-Impressionist Painter (January 19, 1839 - October 22, 1906)
Price: $2.99

4.0 out of 5 stars What a ratings problem.., January 5, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
The paintings are great. Give them five stars. There is no contents or indexing. That's a one star. You can find a painting if you know its title, and then type it in using "search". So, on balance, when you consider the price this collection rates about four stars.

One further note: quality might vary depending on which Kindle you have. I have an HD8.9 so I assume I have the highest quality that the Kindle can provide.


The Birth of the Republic, 1763-89, Fourth Edition (The Chicago History of American Civilization)
The Birth of the Republic, 1763-89, Fourth Edition (The Chicago History of American Civilization)
by Edmund S. Morgan
Edition: Paperback
Price: $10.71
68 used & new from $5.40

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 Stars, But Don't Buy It!, December 14, 2012
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Don't buy it if you have the 1992 third edition of this book. Word for word the text is the same as the 3rd edition. Well, what's new then? A 3 and 1/2 page introduction by Joseph Ellis, and at the end a brief essay on the scholarship of the American Revolution by Rosemarie Zagarri. Not even the bibliography has been updated for this "edition". It even states in the book that the text hasn't been changed.

I won't write a review of the text. There are many fine reviews that you can read for the 3rd edition, and I mostly agree with the four and five star reviews. It's a great, although brief book on the political aspects of the history of the period. My only qualification is that if you are truly interested in the Revolutionary era you need more books than just this one. Unfortunately the 20 year old bibliography isn't an awful lot of help...although there are some still in print classics listed by authors such as Bailyn (Ideological Origins of the American Revolution), Fischer (Albion's Seed), Wood (Radicalism of the American Revolution), Middlekauff (The Glorious Cause), and others.

I am really concerned about the ethics of a growing trend among publishers who have become too enamored of words like "new", "revised" and "anniversary" placed in front of "edition" when there really has been no modification of the text.

If you don't own any edition of this book, then by all means buy it. If you have the 3rd edition my recommendation is to save some money, and don't buy it.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Dec 21, 2012 10:50 AM PST


No Title Available

93 of 167 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars You Can't Set Up Collections For Books on this Kindle, November 20, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I have four other Kindles, and am quite pleased with them. I am a serious reader, and have over 1500 books already on my Kindles. When you have that many books you need to be able to organize them by subject matter, i.e. fiction, mysteries, history, science, medicine, psychology, etc.

All of my other Kindles allow you to set up such a library using its "collections" feature. The HD8.9 does not allow you to do this. Sure, you can arrange your books by author or title, but most people, including myself, cannot memorize the author or titles or even subject matter of a large number of books. I wanted to use the HD8.9 for my books that have a lot of pictures and/or maps e.g art, history, military history, science, photography and the like. I have perhaps 700 books in those categories, and this new Kindle won't allow me to organize them. Other than this problem the HD8.9 works just fine. Wonderful. I've read comments re this in some Amazon forums. Some say that this new kindle is oriented more toward other things like movies. That's OK, but their site ads mention its book use repeatedly.

OK, why the one star? I Think that the lack of a collection function is a near fatal problem to people like myself, and ONLY to those using a Kindle to amass a large book library. It's not suitable for this purpose. It is of interest to note that one of my older Kindles did not have collection capability, and at one point Amazon developed and sent owners a software upgrade to enable collections. It would seem that Amazon had realized the need or value of providing this feature. So why now is it no longer a valued component for the HD8.9?

I probably will find a use for it on a limited basis, especially for books on art and photography. If I limit its use to one or two categories I can probably deal with it OK.

It's still a disappointment in that I had high hopes of building a large library of books on it.
Comment Comments (34) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Dec 25, 2012 6:37 PM PST


The Buried Sky
The Buried Sky
by Keith Hartman
Edition: Paperback
Price: $9.48
28 used & new from $7.25

2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Dystopia Lite, October 18, 2011
This review is from: The Buried Sky (Paperback)
The world as we know it has ended; the great "Burn" has scorched the earth. Knowing that humanity was about to destroy itself in cataclysmic warfare a prescient American filled a huge cave with everything needed to sustain life, and persuaded a group of people to follow him into the cave, and then slammed the door shut on surface earth. Now it's twenty years later, and everything seems to be just fine with the 200+ citizens of the underground world.

Well there are some problems, first of which is that the cave seems to be infested with pests: adolescents. Mind you I am not a kid hater, having three of my own, but this group seems to be a feckless lot. Most of them seem to pass the day in idleness, except when they are having sex with someone else's parents. The novel seems to be written in the young adult category, but I am not about to buy extra copies for my kids to read.

Shortly after the story starts the novel's narrator is informed that his father has been murdered, and our hero, Calvin, is the prime suspect. Calvin runs around trying to solve the murder while the cave's leaders run around trying to find Calvin.

As in most SF novels you are going to have to have a big helping of belief suspension. My mind kept interrupting me with the question of "How is that possible?" All in all, though, it is a serviceable plot with a nice surprise ending. Some will say they guessed the outcome early on, but in all modestly, I admit that I didn't figure it out.

Some readers have mentioned a simile to Plato's philosophy regarding his cave allegory, but, while I find that comparison extremely far fetched, the concept does not add nor detract from the story. Why did I give this book just three stars? While both entertaining and somewhat amusing, I found the novel to be fairly lightweight.


Free Kindle Books and Tips
Free Kindle Books and Tips
Price: $0.99

50 of 61 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not My Area of Interest, April 24, 2011
I'll be blunt about it. I'm not at all interested in the religious orientation, and I'm not interested in books that seem to be holding on to the bottom rung of literature. There are a lot of wonderful works of literature free or almost free on Kindle, but you won't find them in this blog. I don't mean to be a snob; it's just that my interests don't fit this particular niche.
Comment Comments (9) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 25, 2012 7:26 PM PST


The history of England ... to the revolution in 1688The history of England
The history of England ... to the revolution in 1688The history of England

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Evaluation of the e-book, August 6, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I'm too modest to attempt to review the works of the greatly esteemed David Hume, but thought those contemplating buying this book might like to know some facts about it.

First of all this seems to cover just the the period from the Commonwealth through the revolution (1660ish to 1689ish). I thought it covered more, but it doesn't. Secondly, there is no "contents" page that helps you go from chapter to chapter by simply pushing the enter key. It's easy enough to read, but I didn't go through it page by page to see if there were major flaws. There are various typos which I wouldn't dare to blame on Mr. Hume.

The frustrating thing about these downloads are that you are never sure what you are getting. Of course at this price you can just toss it out if it's not what you want.


Friend of the Devil (Inspector Banks Novels)
Friend of the Devil (Inspector Banks Novels)
by Peter Robinson
Edition: Hardcover
215 used & new from $0.01

7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars I can name that tune in......, July 3, 2008
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Peter Robinson writes easy going British police procedurals that are generally quite well done. Alas author Robinson seems to be losing it in some regards. I recoiled in horror when I was informed that main series character Chief Inspector Banks has purchased an ipod. Robinson has this strange literary gimmick of telling the reader what music is playing when we ride along in Bank's car, when we stop to have lunch with him in a pub, when we are riding in an elevator, when he is at a party, and when he is about to go to bed. And now that Banks has an ipod we can constantly be informed as to what notes are flooding the Inspector's brain. It's bad enough that I usually don't like a single bit of the music that seems to entrance Mr. Banks, but when the musical program information intrudes constantly you want nothing more than to grab his ipod and smash it against a wall.

Well enough of that. Here's my other problem with this particular novel. It is a continuation of a novel that Robinson wrote about seven years ago. While bits and pieces of the original book's plot are scattered throughout this book, there is no thorough exposition of the original book's plot. I did read the source book (Aftermath), but sometimes couldn't remember enough parts of it to make Friend of the Devil a completely understandable read. One of the characters in the book Aftermath seems to be on a killing spree, and Banks and his on again off again girl friend Inspector Cabbot are trying to find the killer.

Many of Robinson's novels, like this one, could be done as a play, because much of what goes on in the books are interrogations. We are forever, with or without music, sitting down and interviewing suspects or witnesses. In this book Robinson brings in two male-female relationships that just go nowhere. Chekov once said "If in the first act you have hung a pistol on the wall, then in the following one it should be fired. Otherwise don't put it there." This book starts out with Annie Cabbot having a one night stand with someone much younger than her. The aftermath of that encounter gets stranger and stranger, and you wonder where this is going to lead. Well it turns out to be a "pistol" that shouldn't have been hung on the wall.

I've always liked Robinson's easy going crime novels, but this one wasn't much fun. The reader really should be better informed about the story in Aftermath that preceded this book. The music problem? It sounds trivial, but it's not especially when you consider that the author also seems obligated to tell you exactly how each character is dressed, and to describe in detail the décor of each house he walks into. Even books have to be discussed. I was surprised when I found out that Annie Cabbot is reading the same book that I am: Tony Judt's modern history book "Post War." Does that spike your interest? I didn't think so, but that's about exciting as this book gets.


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