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HandHelditems iPad mini Ultra Lightweight Aluminum Bluetooth Keyboard Case Cover - White Key (with Integrated IOS Commands and Chocolate Style Keys, Package include a HandHelditems Sketch Stylus Pen)
HandHelditems iPad mini Ultra Lightweight Aluminum Bluetooth Keyboard Case Cover - White Key (with Integrated IOS Commands and Chocolate Style Keys, Package include a HandHelditems Sketch Stylus Pen)

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Press, wait, press harder, wait again, January 18, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This product looks fine but is worthless for typing. The rubber covered keys require a lot of force to be pressed and then you need to wait to see if the key registered or not. Useless. Refund was prompt at least.


My Pizza: The Easy No-Knead Way to Make Spectacular Pizza at Home
My Pizza: The Easy No-Knead Way to Make Spectacular Pizza at Home
by Jim Lahey
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $18.44
76 used & new from $10.60

69 of 76 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great collection of pizza ideas and bonus recipes, April 2, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Jim Lahey, of no-knead bread/ Sullivan Street Bakery fame, has published a gorgeous book he calls "My Pizza". In it, he describes his no-knead approach to pizza dough which is, not surprisingly, practically identical to the bread approach that brought him fame in 2006 when the NY Times food columnist Mark Bittman first wrote about it. While I appreciate how many more people are making good bread at home since they heard about this technique, I have to say I don't entirely understand the no-knead mania. To me, it is a bit like getting excited to find shoes you don't need to tie. A small time savings perhaps, but neither shoe tying nor bread conditioning ever seemed terribly onerous to me. Perhaps this is because I use a middle of the road approach that I learned from the Tartine Bread book. By resting the dough without salt for an hour or so, the amount of time spent conditioning the dough with a few stretches (not kneads) is minimal and sufficient.

I tried Lahey's dough recipe and I had to resist the urge to give the dough even a few stretches. The resulting dough, while acceptable, was still a bit uneven and I am certain even 30-45 seconds of stretching would have improved the dough structure and consistency. Is that too much to ask of a home cook? Mercifully, Lahey devotes about one page to this no-knead dough approach and then moves on to the task at hand: making great pizza.

I'm sounding overly critical of an excellent book on pizza. Jim seems as obsessed with flavor combinations as the best of us pizza cooks. While never fussy with the preparation of the toppings, he is specific about the how and why he has made particular combinations. For example, in the giardinaiera pie, he balances tomatoes, olive oil, garlic, hot chili flakes, arugula and fresh sweet corn. This exquisite vegan creation is purposeful in the things it omits like meat, cheese, and herbs in order to allow the included items be better perceived. Lahey follows few traditions when it comes to pizza. His "pepperoni pie" for example, has no actual cured meat product. Pepperoni is the italian plural of peppers, you see, so this pepperoni pie includes a variety of sweet and hot peppers. Lest you think he has created a book of vegetarian pizzas, I can assure you every other pizza has meat in some form. The charcuterie pie, for example, is a béchamel sauced pizza of knockwurst, bratwurst, sauerkraut and mustard. Prosciutto and lardons make frequent appearances in the book as well.

In trying to re-create the high temperatures of wood fired ovens, he encourages the home cook to pre-heat the pizza stone to 500 degrees or more and then bake the pizza with the broiler on. He aims to cook the pizza in less than 5 minutes this way. You will need to play with your oven to see what it is capable of. Mine seems to work best on the convection setting of 500° as the broiler was not as efficient for me. The pictured pizzas he creates embrace the black char one might associate with using a broiler but not quite the more reserved mahogany char that I get in the wood fired oven. I suppose black char is superior to doughy white pizzas, but it seems a bit excessive at times; for example, the pizza bianco photo on page 112 might more appropriately be titled pizza negro.

In general, his suggestions for pizza toppings are spot on. The balance he suggests in his broccoli rabe pie, for example, with the blend of two cheeses, the broccoli rabe, the béchamel and the heat of the thai chilis is perfect. The commentary next to each pizza about his thought process developing each recipe gives insight into this chef's creative mind.

Also excellent are the recipes he includes for soups, salads, and desserts. A whole section is devoted to "toasts" and the spreads that can be created for them. As a bread baker, I'm always looking for ways to use up my week old bread. I could see a dinner party of nothing more than salad, toasted bread, and toppings like "Garlic scape and lovage pesto" or "White bean and mirepoix spread".

The photos in My Pizza are stunning and mouth watering. Every page made me either hungry or want to cook. There were a couple of photos where the food styling slipped into distracting affectations. For example, on p. 78, the "cauliflower pie" is served on newspaper (who wants ink on their food?) and four pages later, the "corn and tomato pie" is shown sitting on hand made japanese paper (what a waste!). I suppose these indulgences are to be expected in the food grooming world of cookbook photography, but I think they're best when they aren't noticed.

Whether you are hoping to improve your pizza game or this will be the latest addition to your pizza library, you won't be disappointed in "My Pizza" by Jim Lahey. The pizzas are refreshingly new and well conceived while the extra recipes for salads, soups and other courses are an unexpected bonus.
Comment Comments (5) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 12, 2014 6:46 PM PDT


Forks Over Knives Presents The Engine 2 Kitchen Rescue with Rip Esselstyn
Forks Over Knives Presents The Engine 2 Kitchen Rescue with Rip Esselstyn
DVD ~ Rip Esselstyn
Price: $10.39
38 used & new from $7.42

180 of 194 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Could have been so much better, December 27, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
In this DVD, Texas firefighter and nutrition guru Rip Esselstyn visits two families and shows them how to cook a breakfast, lunch and dinner using recipes from the "Engine 2 Diet". They also go shopping and he shows the families what to look for in grocery store products. While an acceptable made-for-TV "hour" program of just over 50 minutes, it could have been so much more. This low budget production is so much less substantial than the 20 year "China Study", the" Forks Over Knives" documentary, or even Rip's father's book "Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease". The DVD was clearly shot over a few of days and edited together quickly to get the DVD out while the "Engine 2 Diet" and "Forks Over Knives" remain hot items.

The instruction given to the families is minimal and the long term outcome is never addressed. Rip shows the families how to prepare only three daily meals. Four children stand by as Rip discards their "Reeses Peanut Butter Cup Cereal" but then this program never shows how they fared months later. How much of what he advocates did they really find success with and what remained a challenge? Did the children really go from Froot Loops to fresh fruit for breakfast so easily? Can they transition from the "meat lovers pizza" to a "broccoli and nutritional yeast pizza" without complaint? This kind of superficial "reality" seems hard to swallow. One of the more convincing elements in the "Forks Over Knives" documentary is how quickly the effects of this diet can be observed in the blood tests of the subjects. Even this kind of follow up is not seen in "The Engine 2 Kitchen Rescue". It simply feels like the producers wanted to spend days not months or years on this project.

Another interesting aspect to revisiting these families would be Rip's reaction to the changes they did not make. For example, he threw out the commercial hummus that one family had in their fridge because of the fat and sodium content. If the busy housewife managed to stop buying milk and meat, but returned to store bought hummus, would Rip be sympathetic? He seems intolerant of variations to the "Engine 2 Diet" even when those modifications are so superior to the average American diet.

As an amateur chef and 20+ year vegetarian, I am critical of Rip's approach in the kitchen. He seems to advocate throwing as many vegetables as possible at every dish with minimal regard to taste. Take his "signature" lasagna with tofu, frozen broccoli, mushrooms, carrots, corn, peppers, onions, tomatoes and sweet potatoes. In my mind, this could easily be 4 meals: traditional Italian (eggplant, zucchini, garlic, onion with lasagna noodles), a tex mex lasagna (roasted peppers, corn, beans, onions layered with corn tortillas), an asian noodle dish (tofu, broccoli, carrots, cashews, asian greens with rice pasta) and then a harvest lasagna (sweet potato, mushroom, caramelized onions, whole grain lasagna and pecans). Not only would this provide 4 meal variations, I would expect any one of them would taste better than the hodgepodge of flavors that Rip seems to endorse in many of his dishes.

The DVD does offer some benefits. Learning to read food boxes carefully and the basics of low fat vegan cooking (with 6 meals) are shown. It is certainly worth the price of the digital rental here on amazon.

I am a fan of the Engine 2 Diet and want all the success for this "plant strong" movement in America. I believe heart disease, diabetes, obesity and many other illnesses are preventable. As a teacher, I see the effects of students who eat poorly vs. those who eat well in the children's attention, attitude and test scores. I just wanted a DVD like this one to do a better job spreading the message.
Comment Comments (12) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 7, 2013 10:46 AM PDT


No Title Available

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Nothing like the picture, April 8, 2011
This jacket is nothing like what is pictured. What arrived appeared to be an imitation leather jacket that had none of the quality and look shown in the picture. The subtle variation in the leather color pictured is absent. The feel is not soft and buttery as you might expect from the image but rather stiff and synthetic feeling. The jacket is poorly constructed, poorly tailored, and seems cheap. While they refunded the purchase price, I'm still out $23 in shipping costs (both ways). In the future I will only purchase leather that I can see and feel in person. Order at your own risk.


Tools Are Made, Born Are Hands: Baking True Artisan Breads in a Wood Fired Oven
Tools Are Made, Born Are Hands: Baking True Artisan Breads in a Wood Fired Oven
by Jim Wills
Edition: Paperback
Price: $26.96
25 used & new from $19.99

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Like attending one of the baker's workshops., December 12, 2010
Mary G's Artisan Bread's master baker Jim Wills offers 2 day workshops to home bakers interested in perfecting their bread and baking skills. For those of us who cannot attend his workshop in Canada, his book "Tools are Made Born are Hands" is almost like being there with him. In it, he walks us through the two day workshop from morning to night each day. The experience is like having a master baker standing over your shoulder offering advice and observations on every aspect of baking. There are plenty of bread books with dozens of recipes on the market, but as most experienced bakers know, bread is more technique and skill than a list of ingredients. Mr. Wills manages to offer up these techniques and skills from basic to advanced without either talking down to the reader or being confusing. Perhaps this ability comes from his background as an English teacher. His writing is clear and interesting while his manner patient yet passionate. He has chosen well exactly 7 recipes, but the explanation behind the mixing, forming and baking of each one offers a lifetime of wisdom. For example, if a baker can recreate the 'Ciabatta' or the 'Pain al'ancienne' they have mastered the art of wet doughs while the techniques for the 'Massa Sovada" are important for understanding enriched sweeter breads.

Jim is a wood fired baker so much of the baking advice centers on these large ovens that more and more home bakers are using. If you are not among these bakers yet, fear not as he gives detailed instructions on how to replicate the breads in a home oven. There is little to criticize in this book if you know what to expect. The intriguing title "Tools are made born are Hands" offers little in terms of knowing what in contained within. This is not a coffee table book like Reinhart's excellent offering The Bread Baker's Apprentice: Mastering the Art of Extraordinary Bread, nor a mammoth collection of recipes like Advanced Bread and Pastry. Instead, it takes us into the workshop and mind of a master baker who is an excellent teacher of his craft. If you are ready to improve your skills and understanding of the art of bread, then let this teacher be your guide.


Dansko Men's Professional Oiled Leather Clog,Antique Brown/Black,45 EU (11.5-12 M US)
Dansko Men's Professional Oiled Leather Clog,Antique Brown/Black,45 EU (11.5-12 M US)
Price: Click here to see our price
2 used & new from $114.04

4.0 out of 5 stars Slighty hard to adjust to, but..., November 10, 2009
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
At first I found these shoes hard to adjust to. The arches were high, the heel is quite high (almost 2 inches!) and my feet would hurt a little after wearing them. Now, however, they are my favorite shoes. I use them whenever I can. They look great. They feel super! They are well made and are perfect for a teacher like me who is on his feet all day.


Prepworks from Progressive GPC-4000 Fruit and Vegetable Chopper
Prepworks from Progressive GPC-4000 Fruit and Vegetable Chopper
Price: $35.74
29 used & new from $23.00

203 of 214 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Super useful kitchen prep tool!, November 10, 2009
While this product seems to scream "As seen on TV!", it really is quite useful.

This week, I used this product to prepare the following:
Sun: Pizza toppings (olives, mushrooms, peppers, onions)
Mon: Soup (celery, onions, carrots)
Tue: Salsa (tomatoes, onions, peppers)
Tue: Spanish rice ( onions, celery, peppers, tomatoes)
Wed: Pad thai (broccoli, peppers, onions)
Thur: Stuffed peppers (onions, zucchini, peppers, mushrooms)
Everyday: Salad (apples, tomatoes, mushrooms, onions, hardboiled egg)
Fri: Apple cake (apples)
Sat: Oatmeal (apples)

The chopper is a little more work to clean than a knife, but MUCH faster and still easy to clean with the included cleaning comb. (don't lose it) Cleaning is little more than rinsing usually. I run it through the dishwasher every few days.

If you don't need to prep a lot of ingredients like I listed or you don't really care if your items are minced/ diced/ sliced into identical shapes, then you don't need this. However, if you do a lot of chopping/ mincing/ slicing and you like it when your finished pieces are all identical (I do!), then this chopper can not be beat. It is very durable but requires a fairly strong push. My children can't push through the same items that I can, but if I take out half the items, then they too enjoy seeing the neatly chopped pieces. Bill - [...]
Comment Comments (5) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 9, 2012 5:02 PM PST


Brother LS2125i Easy-to-Use, Everyday Sewing Machine with 10 stitches including Blind Hem and Zigzag, and 4-Step Auto Buttonhole
Brother LS2125i Easy-to-Use, Everyday Sewing Machine with 10 stitches including Blind Hem and Zigzag, and 4-Step Auto Buttonhole
Price: $80.00
37 used & new from $70.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good sewing machine for learning to sew, December 26, 2008
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I got this machine to help my 7 year old daughter learn to sew. It has been a great machine. The ability to control the machine at very slow speeds is not great. It tends to hum and then race forward. It isn't a problem for me, the parent, but my daughter lacks the control to deal with the faster speed. The controls are simple and only what is essential. The variety of stitches is just what she needs. It is easy to set up and thread. I haven't used the buttonholer yet and I noticed some machines use a "one step" buttonholer. I don't think the 4 steps this machine uses will be a problem, but if you plan to make a lot of buttonholes, this might be a consideration. We are very satisfied with this machine especially considering the reasonable price.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 7, 2009 10:52 AM PST


Dance Dance Revolution Strawberry Shortcake Plug N Play
Dance Dance Revolution Strawberry Shortcake Plug N Play
Offered by You Name the Game
Price: $19.99
15 used & new from $5.00

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not bad for the price., June 24, 2007
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I got this for my 5 year old daughter and I immediately understood what people were saying about the difficulty level. She could not do all four step directions at once (forward, back, left and right steps) and was getting frustrated. I offered to to three of the directions so she could concentrate on just one at a time. (she chose left step) It was a fun way to play together and soon she was asking to take over more and more directions. After playing like this together for a day or so, she was playing the easiest levels by herself and doing quite well. I still wish the game offered even easier levels but if the parent plays with the child, I think the child can pick up the coordination in an hour or two.

It is remarkable that this game is as inexpensive as it is. The graphics and music are not very sophisticated but for less than $15, it is worth every penny.


Flower Confidential: The Good, the Bad, and the Beautiful in the Business of Flowers
Flower Confidential: The Good, the Bad, and the Beautiful in the Business of Flowers
by Amy Stewart
Edition: Hardcover
110 used & new from $0.20

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Makes the mundane fascinating!, March 1, 2007
Amy Stewart joins the ranks of other authors who make the everyday fascinating. Dava Sovel made the concept of "longitude" captivating. Kurlansky made everyday "Salt" capitvating. Michael Pollan took on the mundane subjects of gardening and eating and turned them into page-turners as well as thought-provoking, life-changing events. In her second book, Amy Stewart made "Worms" seem monumental in "The Earth Moved..." and now she takes on the grocery store flower in ways that will make you stop and think. If you enjoy thinking about things that most people take for granted, read "Flower Confidential" and you will never see that bouquet of flowers in the supermarket the same again.


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