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Nagura Stone, 7/8" x 7/8" x 3"
Nagura Stone, 7/8" x 7/8" x 3"
Offered by Nagura Stones
Price: $18.30

54 of 57 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quality Synthetic Nagura Stone, May 26, 2012
This is an excellent synthetic Nagura stone by King Ice Bear. I'm surprised that it's uses have not all been mentioned by previous reviewers as of the posting of this review. I currently am using this Nagura stone with my King Ice Bear 6000 Grit Waterstone.

In short: This is a good Nagura stone, it wears slowly, is synthetic, is around 320 grit, and comes at a decent price, but no Nagura is cheap. There is not a lot to say about this particular Nagura stone, however, I elaborate a bit more below about this Nagura stone, and Nagura stones in general. There seems to be some misconceptions of their uses as I have read on websites in the past.

Nagura stones can do a few things:
For a synthetic sharpening stone such as the King Ice Bear 6000 Grit Waterstone, it creates a slurry that is otherwise not possible with such a ceramic bonded stone, cleans the pores as the low slurry action of the stone by itself is not enough to keep the small pored free of metal, and it helps to keep the stone flat. However, using a Nagura stone on a uneven stone eventually creates unevenness in the Nagura stone itself, which requires flattening as well.

Nagura stones are not meant to be used as a sharpening stone, but rather a sharpening aide to a higher grit stone. For a natural stone Nagura is usually not needed, but aides in increasing aggressiveness of the stone by preparing a slurry prior to sharpening. For a synthetic stone, a Nagura stone is quite necessary. Synthetic stones do not create much slurry, about 10% that of a natural stone in my experience. This in turn causes the pores of the stone to become clogged with debris. The Nagura stone helps to remove this debris. I have successfully used sandpaper in the past, but the Nagura is more effective, easier, and quicker.

However, Nagura stones do have a downside.
Most Naguras decrease the edge refinement and lower the overall grit. This does not apply to sharpening stones that use a smaller, same grit stone as a Nagura. This applies to general Nagura stones such as this one.
Synthetic Nagura stones are usually around 320 grit, while natural Nagura stones are about 400 grit. While preparing a slurry, these 320 or 400 grit particles are breaking off and becoming a small part of the slurry. This causes a bit of unevenness in terms of true edge refinement, and the scratch pattern is a mixture of both grits in the slurry. I recommend using a Nagura for the majority of the sharpening, and then doing the final bit on the same stone, but with the Nagura slurry cleaned off.
This will result in higher edge refinement.

I do not recommend using any Nagura stone other than a same grit stone for a Nagura stone on sharpening stones higher than 8000 grit. Higher grit stones tend to have looser bonding, and some can wear rapidly if touched by something at such a low grit as 400, or 320, a knife edge included.

Note: review is subject to change, this is usually due to grammar/punctuation edits to improve overall coherence. Changes may also be made to add to the review, or remove that which I determine unnecessary. If you have any constructive comments, or constructive criticisms, feel free to leave a comment on my review.
Comment Comments (5) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 21, 2014 6:52 PM PST


Stanley 10-049 Pocket Knife with Rotating Blade
Stanley 10-049 Pocket Knife with Rotating Blade
Price: $6.13
53 used & new from $6.13

23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good tool, but not perfect, September 11, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is for the Stanley 10-049 Pocket Knife with Rotating Blade Stanley 10-049 Pocket Knife with Rotating Blade.
I have owned this pocket knife since December 2009.

This knife makes a good tool, but there are some downfalls of the design.

The Blade
The blade is a modified sheepsfoot blade. The modification that Stanley made creates a thinner, sharper tip than a traditional sheepsfoot blade. This blade resembles a disposable razor blade, and cuts similarly to one. The blade does not use a standard "V-Grind" that many pocket knives use. This knife uses a V-Grind with a micro-bevel. This micro-bevel causes the knife to be very sharp, at the cost of edge retention. The blade on my knife, has a tendency to hit the handle when closing. I tried adjusting the pivot screw. The screw was either secure and the blade hit the handle occasionally, or the screw was too loose and could come out during use.

The Steel
The edge retention, as with your average razor blade, is poor. However, due to the thinness of this knife and the grind, when I would consider this knife dull, it still cuts decently. I have never bothered buying replacement blades, and instead, I sharpen the original blade. The blade has been sharpened at least 10 times and the edge is in good condition. If you are able, I recommend sharpening the blade, as opposed to buying a new one.

The Handle
The powder-coating on this knife makes the knife too slick. I assume that this coating is to make the handle appear to be metal, when it's plastic, epoxy handle according to the Stanley website. Due to the slickness of this knife and the small finger choil, your hand is likely to slip into the blade. I recommend wearing a glove every time you use this knife.

The Lock
The lock on this knife has a fairly strong spring. This makes the knife lock always engage when opened due to the spring tension. This spring also keeps the blade from opening. This lock works similarly to that of a back lock does. When the knife opens, a piece of plastic slides in between the knife tang and the inner handle, preventing the knife from closing. This design is a bit weak. The blade rattles and if you apply a bit of force to try and close the knife, the plastic piece inside flexes.

Overall Construction
The overall construction of this knife is decent, but not great. the powder coat is not uniform, the texturing does not add enough grip to the knife. The Stanley logo has the most grip. The lock is weak, but if you are responsible, the lock should hold up fine. The finger choil is too shallow. The blade steel is that of a typical razor blade. if you are happy with how razor blades perform, you may like this knife as well.

Conclusion
This is a good tool, but some things need to be changed before I would recommend this knife to everyone.

Suggestions for Improvement: Make the finger choil deeper, use a piece of steel to lock the blade into place, texture the handle better, and adjust how the blade is held by the pivot screw to prevent the blade from getting damaged while closing.

Note: review is subject to change, this is usually due to grammar/punctuation edits to improve over all coherence. Changes may also be made to add to the review, or remove that which I determine unnecessary. If you have any constructive comments, or constructive criticisms, feel free to leave a comment on my review.
Comment Comments (5) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Dec 11, 2013 1:38 PM PST


King Ice Bear 6000 Grit Waterstone
King Ice Bear 6000 Grit Waterstone
Offered by sharejapan
Price: $35.00
4 used & new from $28.46

32 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, synthetic stone, September 10, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is for the King Ice Bear 6000 Grit sharpening stone.
I have owned this sharpening stone since June 2011.

Note: It is not mentioned on the current amazon product description, but this sharpening stone comes affixed to a plastic stone holder. As far as I can tell, the stone cannot be removed from this holder. This is good if you want a stone to be in a stone holder, but bad if you plan on using every bit of the sharpening stone.

This stone is a synthetic stone. As opposed to a natural stone, this particular synthetic stone does NOT create a slurry. Synthetic stones vary a bit from natural stones, see my comparison below. Some are misled when they read "ceramic sharpening stone". Many think that the entire stone is ceramic, such as some of the Shaptons are. However, ceramic in terms of sharpening stones may refer to the grit bonding. The grit in this stone is bonded by ceramic, causing the stone to wear slowly. Due to there being no slurry, the stone cuts slower than a traditional Japanese waterstone. The ceramic stone can also become clogged easily. When you sharpen, you may notice that you see tiny dark gray/black dots in the surface of the stone. This is steel clogging the pores. Rinsing the stone with water and rubbing the stone with your fingertips removes some of this clogging. I find that rubbing the stone on sandpaper the same you would re-flatten the stone removes the steel from the pores of the stone. This stone cuts fairly fast and leaves an excellent edge. I recommend stropping after using this stone, or any sharpening stone for that matter.

I have ordered a Nagura Stone to use with this stone and will update this review once I use the Nagura Stone to comment on the effectiveness of the stone combination.
Update (5/26/12): I have had and used this stone for quite a few months, but wanted to wait until I have used the stone enough to be sure of my opinion on it. I highly recommend the King Ice Bear Nagura Stone, it creates a slurry rapidly, helps to keep the stone flat, and very effectively unclogs the pores of the stone. This stone is very nice to have for synthetic sharpening stones such as this one. There is a downside to using a Nagura stone, I go into more detail on that in my review of the aforementioned Nagura stone.

Natural vs Synthetic stone
These are general observations and may vary greatly from stone to stone.

Natural:
Creates a slurry
Wears away faster
More expensive
Needs to be flattened more often
Cuts faster
Can only be soaked in water for a limited amount of time before damage to the stone occurs
Inconsistent grain

Synthetic:
Creates no slurry
Wears away slower
Cheaper
Doesn't need to be flattened as often
Has a tendency to clog
Cuts slower
Usually can be soaked as long as you desire prior to using
Uniform grain

Update (9/21/12): When looking at other king stones, it appears that king makes quite a few 6000 grit stones. For reference, this stone is made by King and is model number "S-3". The dimensions of the stone are (in millimeters) 185x62x15.

Note: review is subject to change, this is usually due to grammar/punctuation edits to improve over all coherence. Changes may also be made to add to the review, or remove that which I determine unnecessary. If you have any constructive comments, or constructive criticisms, feel free to leave a comment on my review.


No Title Available

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A delicate, tough knife, September 10, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is for the DLC Coated Kershaw Leek Plain Edge Knife with 14C28N Steel Model no. 1660CKT.
I have had this knife since November 2010.

Upon reading the title of this review, you may be a bit confused. "How can something be both delicate and tough?" I am using knife terminology when talking about toughness. Toughness is the ability of steel to bend, while retaining it's original shape. For example, if you were to take nearly any spoon and bend it a little, the spoon would stay bent. This is low toughness. If you were to take a thin steel ruler or a shatter resistant plastic one and laterally flex the ruler, the ruler would "spring" back to it's original shape, this is high toughness.

The Blade

The blade shape is a modified drop point with a fairly shallow hollow grind. This blade is thin at it's thickest area, and much thinner at the tip. The blade shape lends itself excellently to an EDC knife, particularly, for cardboard, assuming you are careful with the tip. The edge grind is mostly straight, with a slight upward sweep 2/3 of the distance to the tip. This is not a hard use or moderate use knife in terms of tip strength, it's the weakest tip on any knife that I have seen thus far. On the positive side, this tip is tough. While cutting a card box on two separate occasions, I slipped and hit something hard with the tip. The first time, I slipped and hit a ceramic plate. The second time, I slipped and hit a piece of glass with quite a bit of force. The tip dented and bent a little, causing the very tip of this knife (0.5-1.5mm) to seem completely dull. I was able to correct the tip with a honing steel, and sharpening stones. Had this knife been made from a less tough steel, the tip would have chipped or snapped.

The Steel

As previously mentioned, the steel is quite tough. Another interesting aspect of the steel, 14C28N is that it is a modified razor blade steel, and presents similar qualities to 13C26. Originally, Kershaw had primarily used 13C26, but with that steel, in combination with many Kershaws having a bead blast, Kershaw had problems with reports of rusting knives from users. To help alleviate this problem, Kershaw upgraded to 14C28N. The following are the steel specs.
13C26: Carbon - 0.68 Chromium - 12.9 Silicon - 0.40 Manganese - 0.60)
14C28N: (Carbon - 0.62 Chromium - 14.0 Silicon - 0.20 Manganese - 0.60
(Nitrogen - 0.11)
14C28N also has a small amount of Phosphorus (max of 0.025) and Sulfur (max of 0.010) however, in such small quantities, these are added to the steel to make machining easier.
To make the steel more rust resistant, the carbon content was lowered, the chromium content was increased, and Nitrogen was added to the steel. This is why 14C28N is 14C28N and not "14C28". The lower amount of silicon lowers the strength of the steel, thus increasing toughness.
This steel is very fine grained. That is, the steel refines to an extremely polished edge during sharpening. The steel does not respond very well to sharpening stones until you get into the higher grits. At 6000 grit, the steel responds well and readily refines. This steel responds superbly to stropping, taking a final edge very quickly. The secret is to not apply much force when stropping this steel and using less force every pass on the strop until you are actually lifting up on the knife, using less force than the knife weighs for the final stropping.
The polished edge lasts quite awhile, a bit longer than AUS8, but not as long as VG-10. I find that at lower grits (1000-2000) the knife has a nice micro serration, but lose the micro serration quickly. This causes the edge sharpness to degrade quicker at lower grits.

The Handle

The handle of the knife is made out of 410 stainless steel. The handle is what I refer to as "ergonomically neutral". That is, the handle has a very neutral shape. This makes the handle feel comfortable in a variety of different grips on the knife. The knife has a small finger choil and a small amount of jimping on the spine of the blade when open. This helps secure your hand and prevent your hand from slipping into the cutting edge. All of the edges are radiused; no part of the handle digs into your hand when you squeeze the knife. The handle is very comfortable.

The Lock

The lock is known as a frame lock. The lock comes into contact with the blade tang by about 60% of its thickness. This causes the lock to be adequately strong, while being easy to disengage as well. The blade is propelled by kershaw's Speed Safe, assisted opening technology. This causes a tortion bar to engage and fully propel the blade into a locked position everytime I have opened the knife. The tortion bar engages from the blade being open 30% to about 50%. Frame locks are often seen as being an unreliable lock (along with liner locks). This is usually due to a bad experience with a cheap, low quality knife. If you buy higher end knives, such as Kershaws, the locks are made well and will not close on a responsible knife user.

Note: There is another "lock" on this knife. This lock is a small pin that slides over the tip of the knife when the knife is in the closed position. This prevents the knife from being accidentally opened. I find it annoying and tighten the screw down so that this opening-prevention lock never engages. I find it unnecessary, but some may prefer it.

The Pocket Clip

The pocket clip is quite stiff, but still easy to use. The DLC coating makes the entire knife have little traction, this makes the knife fairly easy to get on and off of your pocket. This is due to the clip being slick, and the portion of the handle under the clip. The clip can be positioned for right hand tip-up or tip-down carry. The pocket clip has "Kershaw" stamped into it and ads a nice touch to the appearance of the pocket clip.

Overall Construction

The overall construction of this knife is superb. The blade is centered near perfectly, and does not rub the handle scales unless lateral force is applied when closing. The grip you get on this knife is nice, despite the handle being a bit slick due to the DLC coating. The shape of this handle fits well into the palm of your hand. The construction of the knife is solid, and the contrasting silver screws look nice as well. The handle is all stainless steel, and the pivot is well reinforced. The knife has no side to side play and I have not needed to adjust the screws often.

Side Notes: The DLC coating does NOT aide in the prevention of rust. DLC is porous and will NOT help prevent rust, as other blade coatings may, such as Teflon. The DLC is quite hard. I found it amusing to take a piece of copper and gently glide it along the handle of the knife to see that the copper had been filed down, and the DLC has no mark on it (aside from the copper line).

Conclusion
The thinness of this knife, along with the steel used, creates a wicked sharp knife that glides through many materials. The handle is very comfortable and can fit a variety of sized hands. The steel stays sharp and is easy to sharpen. The pocket clip functions well. The handle and blade have a imperfection-free DLC coating on them, which looks nice and is uniform throughout the knife.

Update: 9/21/11
While I cannot say for certain, the tip seems quite weak. Too weak for a primary Every Day Carry (EDC) knife, in my opinion. I feel as though the knife tip will snap off some day. The tip strength alone makes me want to revise my rating to 4 stars. However, I will not negatively rate the product based on speculation unless/until the tip does break.

Note: review is subject to change, this is usually due to grammar/punctuation edits to improve over all coherence. Changes may also be made to add to the review, or remove that which I determine unnecessary. If you have any constructive comments, or constructive criticisms, feel free to leave a comment on my review.


Carhartt Men's Journeyman Belt
Carhartt Men's Journeyman Belt
Price: $22.95 - $28.00

57 of 59 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent belt, built well, August 28, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I have had this belt since October 2010. This belt has held up very well and has stretched very little. I have only worn belts regularly for 2 years, at first, I thought that all belts were created equally. I was wrong. I initially purchased a generic 10 dollar belt at a local store. Within half of a year, the belt was excessively worn on the sides, the belt peeled apart in layers, and the majority of the inside of the belt where the buckle was when the belt was worn, was shredded. The belt was still barely holding together, but I retired it and decided to buy a good belt.

It has been nearly a year and this belt, the Carhartt Men's Journeyman Belt, has shown little wear. In my experience, the leather gets a bit dry, but using mink oil 2-3 times a year solves this problem. This is not the fault of the belt, leather get dry. If anything, this is a testament to the belt being actual leather.
I highly recommend this belt, do not waste your money on a low quality belt.

Update 9/18/2012 : This belt is still going strong. After the first six months or so of minor stretching (half a size to maybe a size; no more than one hole on the belt) the belt has not stretched more. It has been nearly two years of daily wear and the belt is still holding together well. The areas where the belt has worn most have turned a light gray to brown in color. The belt is still thick, strong, and pliable after two years. This belt costs about twice what the local junk belts cost, but lasts at least 4 times as long. That is value.


Spyderco Delica4 Lightweight FRN Flat Ground PlainEdge Knife
Spyderco Delica4 Lightweight FRN Flat Ground PlainEdge Knife
Price: $51.20 - $109.95

144 of 152 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars High quality, excellent Spyderco knife, July 3, 2011
This review is for the Gray Spyderco Delica Full Flat Grind (FFG) Plain Edge knife with VG-10 steel.

The Blade
The blade is in the shape known as a "leaf blade". The leaf blade is more or less a modified straight edge knife. The blade is similar to a straight edge with a slight curve in it. This gives the knife the ability to slice similarly to a straight edge and a drop point. The blade is tapered on the sides, beginning about a quarter inch after the jimping ends. The thumb hole, also known as a "Spyder Hole" allows the knife to be opened easily, more easily than a thumb stud. The thumb hole does not sacrifice any strength, lightens the knife slightly, and can be easily opened with gloves. The edge is well ground, right at about 30º inclusive, which is right where spyderco sharpens most (possibly all) of their beveled knives. The blade also has a nice shine to it. This is a near mirror finish, about 70% like a mirror. This helps prevent rust, and makes the knife easier to clean. The only downside to this finish is that the knife is easier to scratch as opposed to a satin or stonewashed finish.

The Steel
The steel, VG-10 is a very high quality steel. The steel is moderately difficult to sharpen, this however, is easily countered with frequent touch-ups on a strop or fine stone. The steel has a fine grain to it, finer than S30v, yet not quite as fine as 13c26n. The moderately high amount of carbon, and the moderate amount of Vanadium, Manganese, and Molybdenum are the primary reasons for this steels wear resistance. This wear resistance is noticed on a stone as well. The steel feels like it slides across the stone more then the stone scratches the edge. This is solved by using a little more downward pressure when sharpening on a stone. As mentioned, this steel is fine grained, this contributes to a few positive attributes of the steel: When/If the steel chips, the chips are normally small. When sharpening, the vanadium carbides aide in refining the edge, causing this steel to take a finer edge than some other steels. Last, the fine grain creates a higher edge stability than some other steels. This edge stability helps prevent warping of the edge. While finer grain steels may chip easier than some larger grain steels, when they do chip, the chips are small and not chunks of your edge broken off. A aspect of all fine grained steels is that they usually have a better resistance to corrosion than larger grains, this is because oxygen cannot easily get in between the grains and cause oxidization. Rust resistance is usually better determined by carbon to chromium ratio, and blade finish. For example, a bead-blasted finished VG-10 delica will rust sooner than a mirror finished VG-10 delica.

The Handle
This knife is very comfortable both in the hand and in the pocket. The scales are very flat, as opposed to round handle scales. The knife uses "Bi-Directional Texturing". This texturing helps to prevent the knife from sliding during use. This provides excellent grip and feels a little sharp. This does not feel sharp like a knife blade, but sharp like a very coarse sand paper: sharp, yet grippy. The underside of the handle scaled, opposite to the side that has the lock has some type of elongated finger groves. These elongated finger groves hold your finders very comfortably. The peaks of the groves are not very sharp, causing minimal discomfort when using the knife for an extended period of time, or applying a large amount of force to cut through the medium you are cutting. The handle scales are steel lined. This gives the knife more rigidity when applying lateral force to your blade. These steel liners are skeletonized to lighten the knife, while keeping the majority of the strength gained with steel liners. My favorite thing about knives with steel liners is that the area around the pivot tends to be much stronger. This prevents blade play and usually results in the pivot screw staying tight longer versus a non steel lined knife. The only sacrifice is weight, steel weighs more than FRN. This causes the knife to be heavier than it would be if it were made out of solid FRN.

The Lock
This lock is known as a back lock. The blade has a deep, wide cutout in it, the back lock locks into this cutout. This causes the lock to be strong, despite it's thin profile. The back lock has what Spyderco calls a "David Boye Dent" in it. The purpose of this is to prevent the lock from disengaging while you grip the knife with a lot of force. The thing that I like most about this dent is the comfort it adds when you grip the knife hard. The back lock does not dig into your hand under pressure. I have not had this lock, or any of Spydercos back locks ever fail or disengage on me. This lock is strong, simple, and has been proven reliable by it's use for many years.

The Pocket Clip
The clip is stiff and springy. The clip is rigid enough to stay on your pocket, yet flexible (springy) enough to be easy to clip and
un-clip from your pocket. The paint wears off easily, especially if you brush up against anything with your pocket clip. The pocket clip is near perfect. I prefer it to be a bit stiffer, however, for the weight of the knife, it's not going to move around very much, if at all in your pocket. The pocket clip is secured by 3 screws, this prevents the clip from sliding, which you may experience with some other 2 screw pocket clips. As with any knife, do not over-tighten the screws, they are essentially tapped into a high quality plastic. Once you feel the screws getting snug, tighten cautiously. I stripped a screw thread. The hole was entirely stripped, and without 3 screws, the pocket clip was not rigid enough for my tastes. Now I carry the knife without a clip. This is not the fault of Spyderco, but the fault of me, I tend to over-tighten screws.

Overall Construction
The overall construction of this knife is excellent. The blade is centered near perfectly, and does not rub the inner liners/scales unless lateral force is applied when closing. The jimping is precise and consistent, both on the handle and on the blade. The overall finish on the knife, from the handle to the blade is great. The pivot stays tight for a very long time. The overall build quality is excellent.

Conclusion
The flat grind of the knife aides in slicing. The VG-10 gets very sharp, the handle is comfortable, the lock strong, and the steel liners help strengthen the knife. I highly recommend this knife.

Note: review is subject to change, this is usually due to grammar/punctuation edits to improve over all coherence. Changes may also be made to add to the review, or remove that which I determine unnecessary. If you have any constructive comments, or constructive criticisms, feel free to leave a comment on my review.
Comment Comments (11) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 20, 2015 8:18 PM PST


Benchmade 556 Plain Edge/ Satin Finish Blade/ Black Handle
Benchmade 556 Plain Edge/ Satin Finish Blade/ Black Handle
Offered by SaltwaterAquarium
Price: $87.25
41 used & new from $64.95

58 of 71 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great knife, only have one gripe., July 2, 2011
Note: This review was once posted on a different Benchmade 556 listing, however, that listing has since been deactivated. I write reviews to inform others, this is why the review has been moved.

This review is for the Benchmade Model 556 Mini Griptilian with thumb studs, a black handle, a plain edge (non serrated), and 154CM blade steel.

The Blade
The blade has a great modified drop-point shape to it. Towards the tip of the knife there is just enough belly for just about any EDC (Every Day Carry) task. The blade is easily opened with the thumb studs, the provide nice traction and are situated in the correct area for easy deployment. The stone washed blade makes the blade look similar to having many small scratched on it. However, this looks nicer than I am able to describe it. This finishing is also nice for when you use your knife and it does eventually get scratched up, as the scratches are difficult to distinguish from the original blade finish. My largest gripe with this knife is it's edge. This edge is quite fat, it is around 70º inclusive geometry. This makes the edge last awhile, but cutting through thick and coarse materials becomes a pain. For example, cutting through thick card board can be difficult, but anything relatively thin is a breeze due to the sharpness.

The Steel
This steel (154CM) is some good stuff. This steel is pretty easy to sharpen and holds it's edge for quite awhile. My only gripe with the steel is that it tends to be a bit grainy. Grainy as in the grains in the steel are large and more noticeable than some other steels that I have used. AUS-8, VG-10, S30V, and 8Cr13MoV to mention a few. Due to this grain structure, I have found that this knife responds much better to sharpening with a stone than the previously mentioned steels, but it also doesn't respond well to stropping. Even after stropping the edge still feels a little toothy. This steel also has decent stain resistance. I say decent because I rarely have a knife rust on me, even high carbon steel, so I am not at liberty to say that is is very stain resistant as my environment is more humid than other regions and I still oil my knives every now and then.

The Handle
Did you ever wonder why this knife is called a Mini Griptilian? Well, when you hold it you will know right away. This knife digs into your hand a little, so I would not suggest it for someone with excessively delicate skin/hands. On each handle scale, there is a pyramid like checker board pattern. This is, there are many tiny pyramids arranged right next to each other and in rows. Also, this knife has a finger-choil that is very comfortable a gives you a good grip, preventing your index and middle (maybe more, depends on how you hold knives) from sliding into the cutting area and keeps them safe. Also, there are ridges all around the outside of the handle that give your palm grip aswell. Only downside to the grip is that the thumb ramp is minimal and the jimping is a bit rounded off, it could be a bit sharper for even more grip.

The Lock
The Axis Lock is quite unique. There are two Omega springs on each side of the cylindrical lock. These springs give tension that helps keep the blade in the handle. When open, this cylindrical piece of steel (420J stainless if you're wondering) wedges the blade tang in between the stop pin. The stop pin prevents the knife from moving upwards, and the Axis Lock (Which I have been referring to as a cylindrical piece of steel thus far) prevents the blade from closing on your hand. While I have not tested this lock, I can say that the knife has never failed to engage when deployed properly, and the blade has never closed on my hand with the Axis Lock engaged.

The Pocket Clip
The pocket clip is simple and straightforward. This is a nice piece of steel that is thick enough, yet flexible enough to hang on to your clothing without losing the knife. I cannot contest to the longevity of this pocket clip, because I have only used the pocket clip for a few weeks to be able to review this entire knife. I then took off the pocket clip and just keep the knife in my pocket. The pocket clip is great, but I prefer not to use pocket clips with any of my knives. My complaint with the pocket clip is that it clamps down where the triangle checkering is at, this can cause clothing to deteriorate/shred eventually.

Overall Construction
The overall construction is great. The scales are held on well, and the steel liners fit inside these handle scales well. These steel liners prevent lateral torsion from wearing your knife as fast as it would wear out if these were not present in the knife. The pivot screw does not loosen up as fast as some of my other knives. The pivot will rarely require tightening. This knife's overall build quality is superb.

Conclusion
This knife is very well made, and will service the user for a very long time. My main gripe as previously stated was the thick primary edge on this knife, this bothers me quite a bit as I cut a lot of card board and the knife can at times require excessive force to cut through thick cardboard. I highly recommend this knife to anyone.

Note: review is subject to change, this is usually due to grammar/punctuation edits to improve over all coherence. Changes may also be made to add to the review, or remove that which I determine unnecessary. If you have any constructive comments, or constructive criticisms, feel free to leave a comment on my review.


No Title Available

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great knife, only have one gripe., November 10, 2010
This review is for the Benchmade Model 556 Mini Griptilian with thumb studs, a black handle, a plain edge (non serrated), and 154CM blade steel.

The Blade
The blade has a great modified drop-point shape to it. Towards the tip of the knife there is just enough belly for just about any EDC (Every Day Carry) task. The blade is easily opened with the thumb studs, the provide nice traction and are situated in the correct area for easy deployment. The stone washed blade makes the blade look similar to having many small scratched on it. However, this looks nicer than I am able to describe it. This finishing is also nice for when you use your knife and it does eventually get scratched up, as the scratches are difficult to distinguish from the original blade finish. My largest gripe with this knife is it's edge. This edge is quite fat, it is around 70º inclusive geometry. This makes the edge last awhile, but cutting through thick and coarse materials becomes a pain. For example, cutting through thick card board can be difficult, but anything relatively thin is a breeze due to the sharpness.

The Steel
This steel (154CM) is some good stuff. This steel is pretty easy to sharpen and holds it's edge for quite awhile. My only gripe with the steel is that it tends to be a bit grainy. Grainy as in the grains in the steel are large and more noticeable than some other steels that I have used. AUS-8, VG-10, S30V, and 8Cr13MoV to mention a few. Due to this grain structure, I have found that this knife responds much better to sharpening with a stone than the previously mentioned steels, but it also doesn't respond well to stropping. Even after stropping the edge still feels a little toothy. This steel also has decent stain resistance. I say decent because I rarely have a knife rust on me, even high carbon steel, so I am not at liberty to say that is is very stain resistant as my environment is more humid than other regions and I still oil my knives every now and then.

The Handle
Did you ever wonder why this knife is called a Mini Griptilian? Well, when you hold it you will know right away. This knife digs into your hand a little, so I would not suggest it for someone with excessively delicate skin/hands. On each handle scale, there is a pyramid like checker board pattern. This is, there are many tiny pyramids arranged right next to each other and in rows. Also, this knife has a finger-choil that is very comfortable a gives you a good grip, preventing your index and middle (maybe more, depends on how you gold knives) from sliding into the cutting area and keeps them safe. Also, there are ridges all around the outside of the handle that give your palm grip aswell. Only downside to the grip is that the thumb ramp is minimal and the jimping is a bit rounded off, it could be a bit sharper for even more grip.

The Lock
The Axis Lock is quite unique. There are two Omega springs on each side of the cylindrical lock. These springs give tension that helps keep the blade in the handle. When open, this cylindrical piece of steel (420J stainless if you're wondering) wedges the blade tang in between the stop pin. The stop pin prevents the knife from moving upwards, and the Axis Lock (Which I have been referring to as a cylindrical piece of steel thus far) prevents the blade from closing on your hand. While I have not tested this lock, I can say that the knife has never failed to engage when deployed properly, and the blade has never closed on my hand with the Axis Lock engaged.

The Pocket Clip
The pocket clip is simple and straightforward. This is a nice piece of steel that is thick enough, yet flexible enough to hang on to your clothing without losing the knife. I cannot contest to the longevity of this pocket clip, because I have only used the pocket clip for a few weeks to be able to review this entire knife. I then took off the pocket clip and just keep the knife in my pocket. The pocket clip is great, but I prefer not to use pocket clips with any of my knives. My complaint with the pocket clip is that it clamps down where the triangle checkering is at, this can cause clothing to deteriorate/shred eventually.

Overall Construction
The overall construction is great. The scales are held on well, and the steel liners fit inside these handle scales well. These steel liners prevent lateral torsion from wearing your knife as fast as it would wear out if these were not present in the knife. The pivot screw does not loosen up as fast as some of my other knives. The pivot will rarely require tightening. This knife's overall build quality is superb.

Conclusion
This knife is very well made, and will service the user for a very long time. My main gripe as previously stated was the thick primary edge on this knife, this bothers me quite a bit as I cut a lot of card board and the knife can at times require excessive force to cut through thick cardboard. I highly recommend this knife to anyone.

Note: review is subject to change slightly, this is usually due to grammar/punctuation edits to improve over all coherence. Changes may also be made to add to the review, or remove that which I determine unnecessary. If you have any constructive comments, or constructive criticisms, feel free to leave a comment on my review.


SanDisk Cruzer Titanium 4 GB USB 2.0 Flash Drive SDCZ7-4096-A10
SanDisk Cruzer Titanium 4 GB USB 2.0 Flash Drive SDCZ7-4096-A10

5.0 out of 5 stars cheap and effective; also strong, December 30, 2008
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
A few years ago i went to a local grocery store I'm sure we all are familiar with and bought a Sandisk 2GB black plastic flash drive for about $30.00. Recently i bought this and wow is it a deal.
* You get 4Gb of memory
* Has an ultra strong case around the flash drive so it is difficult to break by applying force to it
* Low price a little over half the price i paid for half as much memory
* Has a very useful U3 utility program which utilizes the use of multiple programs that are sure to help you

The only con may be the U3 program as i have heard that you cannot remove it.
Overall a great product with currently no drawbacks If you want memory i recommend the plastic version sold here on amazon.com, but if you want decent memory and durability i recommend this one.
If you want memory i still recommend you pay a little extra and get this version as it will last much longer and pay for itself in the long run


Smith's PP1 Pocket Pal Multifunction Sharpener
Smith's PP1 Pocket Pal Multifunction Sharpener
Price: $9.11
105 used & new from $7.63

334 of 361 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great sharpener even better than Smith's Abrasives 2 Step Knife Sharpener, December 30, 2008
This is a great sharpener it makes knives super sharp but not quite razor sharp it is much better than Smith's Abrasives 2 Step Knife Sharpener, that sharpener gets knives just as sharp as it has the same angles to the ceramic part of the sharpener; but that uses rods which get loose and end up rolling as you draw your knife through it and don't sharpen your knife. Also this is easier to get a blade into the ceramic sharpening part. This also includes a serrated knife sharpener, and this works well but i can't say much for it as it is the first serrated knife sharpener i have ever used.

i recommend pulling the blade through the carbide part 10 times using semi heavy to medium force, the using the ceramic part about 10 times using medium force then lighting up to about as light as you can get by the 10th stroke
skip the carbide part if your knife is already adequately sharp, only use the carbide part if your knife i dull or damaged as it takes off a lot of steel


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