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Christopher K. Halbower "Christopher Halbower" RSS Feed (Muskegon, MI)
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Tribune
Tribune
Offered by TheEscapePlace
Price: $84.99
6 used & new from $35.00

7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fun strategy game with a Roman veneer, October 8, 2009
= Durability:3.0 out of 5 stars  = Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars  = Educational:2.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Tribune (Toy)
Tribune is a new game from Fantasy Flight Games. Players vie for control of various factions of Rome in order to become ruler. The first player to amass the enough victory conditions is the winner.

Tribune is a worker placement game. Players are given 5 followers (read: workers) to place on the gameboard. Each place on the board gives players faction cards, denarii or the chance to take control of a faction.

Players need faction cards to take control of the 7 factions in Rome. Faction cards are color coded to correspond to the various factions. Faction cards also have a value on them (usually from 1 to 10). To take control of a faction, players must play more faction cards than the previous owner played or place faction cards with a sum value higher than the previous owner played. This makes for some interesting dynamics since more small cards are definitely better than a couple of high value cards.

Players need money (denarii) to buy more faction cards. Some places on the board give players cheap cards, other places are more expensive. This means you have to choose to place your workers where you can a) get the cards cheap and b) get the most useful faction cards.

There are two opportunities for blind bidding. One space on the board gives players 3 cards for very little money. But there is a blind bid. Also, the placement of the chariot is done by blind bid. The chariot prevents the takeover of a faction that you already own. I really enjoy blind bidding in boardgames. And Tribune is no exception.

When a player takes over a faction, there are two benefits: 1) a "take over" benefit which happens immediately; 2) a faction benefit which happens during every round of the game that you own the faction. Each faction's benefits are different. Here is where the theme of Tribune could use some more refining. The factions more or less give you tokens. The tokens are merely items to be collected in order to win. The tokens and the faction differentation are not really thematic. It feels more like a Roman veneer than an immersion into Roman culture.

The game takes about 5 minutes to set up (10 minutes the first time you play). The game can be played in about 60 minutes with experienced players (up to 90 minutes with newbies).

This game is a welcome addition to most game collections. It will see some play. But I believe most hardcore gamers would acknowledge that Tribune, while fun, is not their favorite.


No Title Available

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wow! I am really impressed!, October 5, 2009
New York Nights by Designer Imposters smells just like Drakkar Noir® but is a fraction of the cost.

Designer Imposter's version (New York Nights) goes for about 1/3 of what Drakkar Noir goes for. Also, it's available at your local department stores (for a bit more than what Amazon charges).

If you are not familiar with the scent of Drakkar Noir, it is a very manly and sensual scent. You will get a lot of attention if you are wearing even a subtle amount of it. And for the price of New York Nights, I highly recommend it.


Who's Who in the JFK Assassination: (An A to Z Encyclopedia)
Who's Who in the JFK Assassination: (An A to Z Encyclopedia)

5.0 out of 5 stars Good reference for the researcher, October 2, 2009
Michael Benson's "Who's Who in the JFK Assassination" is an outstanding reference book for the assassination hobbyist. The book is like a cheaper version of the "Master Index to the JFK Assassination" by Sylvia Meagher and Gary Owens. Benson's book has an alphabetical listing of all the major and minor players in the JFK assassination (like Meagher and Owens' book) but Benson's book has a brief synopsis of who or what these players were to the assassination.

The book weighs in at 532 pages. The first section of the book is a critical apparatus telling the researcher what Benson's abbreviations (used throughout the book) mean. This section also tells the researcher about the source material used to support this work.

The main part of the book is an alphabetical listing of movers and shakers associated in some way with the assassination of President John Kennedy. Because the book is an encyclopedia, it doesn't have to be read sequentially. Indeed, the reader is encouraged to pick through the topics of his choosing and review the data therein. Benson ends each encyclopedia entry with a "See Also" section--a type of keyword tag that give the reader tips on further research. Then the entry has footnotes (in Benson's abbreviated notation) which inform the reader as to where Benson got his information (usually the Warren Report or the HSCA).

I have found it invaluable to have a brief, digestable and alphabetical synopsis of who someone was in the JFK assassination. The notes and the "See Also" sections are the icing on the cake. The author has filed a valuable niche for the assassination hobbyist.

This book makes a good "bathroom reader": the entries are relatively short and the book doesn't have to be read sequentially. If you want an introduction to the JFK assassination, this book can supplement that need. If you are a researcher, this book is quite handy. If you are looking for interesting "bathroom reading", this book can fill that need as well.

I've recommended this book to two people. They looked it over and became so engrossed, they immediately went out and bought their own copies! Benson deserves our kudos. My highest recommendations! *****


Who's Who In The JFK Assassination: An A to Z Encyclopedia
Who's Who In The JFK Assassination: An A to Z Encyclopedia
by Michael Benson
Edition: Paperback
Price: $17.83
50 used & new from $6.86

7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good reference for the researcher, October 2, 2009
Michael Benson's "Who's Who in the JFK Assassination" is an outstanding reference book for the assassination hobbyist. The book is like a cheaper version of the "Master Index to the JFK Assassination" by Sylvia Meagher and Gary Owens. Benson's book has an alphabetical listing of all the major and minor players in the JFK assassination (like Meagher and Owens' book) but Benson's book has a brief synopsis of who or what these players were to the assassination.

The book weighs in at 532 pages. The first section of the book is a critical apparatus telling the researcher what Benson's abbreviations (used throughout the book) mean. This section also tells the researcher about the source material used to support this work.

The main part of the book is an alphabetical listing of movers and shakers associated in some way with the assassination of President John Kennedy. Because the book is an encyclopedia, it doesn't have to be read sequentially. Indeed, the reader is encouraged to pick through the topics of his choosing and review the data therein. Benson ends each encyclopedia entry with a "See Also" section--a type of keyword tag that give the reader tips on further research. Then the entry has footnotes (in Benson's abbreviated notation) which inform the reader as to where Benson got his information (usually the Warren Report or the HSCA).

I have found it invaluable to have a brief, digestable and alphabetical synopsis of who someone was in the JFK assassination. The notes and the "See Also" sections are the icing on the cake. The author has filed a valuable niche for the assassination hobbyist.

This book makes a good "bathroom reader": the entries are relatively short and the book doesn't have to be read sequentially. If you want an introduction to the JFK assassination, this book can supplement that need. If you are a researcher, this book is quite handy. If you are looking for interesting "bathroom reading", this book can fill that need as well.

I've recommended this book to two people. They looked it over and became so engrossed, they immediately went out and bought their own copies! Benson deserves our kudos. My highest recommendations! *****


The Knights Templar
The Knights Templar
DVD ~ James Wignall
Price: $17.08
51 used & new from $2.40

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Quite educational but not a good introduction to the subject, October 2, 2009
This review is from: The Knights Templar (DVD)
This documentary talks in great length about the orthodox history of the Knights Templar. Many of the interviews are with historians who expect a firm understanding of history prior to watching. If you don't have this understanding, many parts may be over your head.

Also, if you are looking for a documentary on the Knights Templar that deals with occult lore, this is not the documentary for you; might I suggest the new Cracking the Da Vinci Code, available for rent at your local video store. Between the 2 of these videos, a person can appreciate the history and myth of the Templars.


REASONABLE DOUBT.  An Investigation into the Assassination of John F. Kennedy.
REASONABLE DOUBT. An Investigation into the Assassination of John F. Kennedy.
by Henry Hurt
Edition: Hardcover
8 used & new from $12.95

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars One fatal flaw prevents this from being the best introduction to the subject, September 14, 2009
Henry Hurt's "Reasonable Doubt" is an overview of the JFK assassination. Hurt was a researcher for the book "Legend: the Secret World of Lee Harvey Oswald" by Edward Epstein. Hurt's research involved little more than contacting US Marines who knew Oswald. After providing research for Epstein, Hurt set aside the JFK case.

In 1981, his odysessy started anew. A man named Robert Easterling contacted him. Easterling was prepared to confess his role in the assassination of President Kennedy. Hurt, in an effort to prepare himself for this unusual interview, Hurt versed himself in the JFK assassination lore.
Hurt's overview of the case is amazing. His prose is easy to follow. His conclusions are logical. The biggest flaw in his research is, unfortunately, the inclusion of the Robert Easterling testimony.

The first chapter reads like a newspaper report. It's nine pages of who, what, where and when. After finishing this, the reader knows the basics of the official story.

Hurt then turns a critical eye to the Warren Commission's findings. There is no index from which to review the Warren Commission's hearings and exhibits. The report is hardly the corrollary of 26 supporting volumes. Congressional committees concluded that the FBI and CIA were derelict in submitting evidence to the Warren Commission. The FBI had destroyed or altered testimony or evidence. Credible leads that pointed away from the Warren Commission's main thesis were ignored.

After concluding the Warren Commission had not settled the issue, Hurt then looks at the autopsy and the Magic Bullet. The doctors in Dallas do not agree with the doctors at Bethesda. The Magic Bullet is pristine whereas test bullets fired into cadavers show significant deformation.

The author spends the next two chapters looking at the Texas School Book Depository and Dealy Plaza in general. Could Oswald have moved that quickly from the 6th floor to the 2nd floor? Were there two men on the 6th floor when the shooting began? And were there shots fired from the grassy knoll? Hurt looks at many witnesses who either were not called to the Warren Commission to testify or whose testimony was not used to draw the conclusions that the Warren Commission drew.

The shooting of Dallas police officer JD Tippit has been called the "Rosetta Stone" of the JFK assassination. Hurt entitled chapter 7, "Tippit's Murder: Rosetta Stone or Red Herring?". He proceeds to cover ground that the Warren Commission covered and some ground that the Warren Commission ignored.

The Warren Commission concluded that Jack Ruby had no ties to organized crime. The House Select Committee on Assassinations concluded that Ruby did have ties to organized crime. Hurt examines this discrepency in chapter 8, "Jack Ruby: Pimp for all Seasons".

Oswald learned the Russian language while he was a US Marine. He was discharged from the USMC and then defected to the Soviet Union. When he came back to the US, he was an open Marxist and an outspoken supporter of Castro--in cities with strong conservative or strong intelligence ties (New Orleans and Dallas). Was Oswald affiliated with some branch of US intelligence? Hurt examines this in chapter 9, "Fingerprints of Intelligence".

The only case ever brought to court regarding the assassination of President Kennedy was the case brought forward by New Orleans Parish DA Jim Garrison. Oswald spent the summer of '63 in New Orleans. There are tantalizing connections between Oswald and elements of US intelligence including ex-Cuban patriots, Guy Bannister and David Ferrie. The author spends a considerable amount of time looking at Oswald's ties to New Orleans in chapter 10, "New Orleans, USA".

The last two chapters are a summation of the conspiracy information up to 1985, the year this book was published. The information is good. Hurt gives you the names of the researchers who put forward certain aspects of the case and how he feels about them. It is hard to disagree with Hurt--he calls them like he sees them. If a conspiracy theory is bizarre, he says so. This section of the book is particular good for the beginner. The beginner can get a brief review of the other researchers and their works here. This section can be used as a stepping stone to other areas of research the beginner may find interesting.

Alas, Henry Hurt's book, "Reasonable Doubt" has one glaring flaw. This flaw is chapter 12, "The Confession of Robert Easterling". Hurt dedicates almost 50 pages to the laugable premise that Robert Easterling was involved in a conspiracy to JFK. Easterling claims he was at a bar having a drink when an acquaintance of his named Manuel Rivera came up to him. He had not seen Rivera in some time so the men had a drink while making small talk. Then Manuel asked Easterling to be a part of a plot to Kennedy. This highly unlikely event is followed up with numerous other claims which not only are unsubstantiated but are completely based in fantasy.
Here's one example. Easterling claims that to make their escape, the real assassins repelled from the 6th floor of the Texas School Book Depository to the ground via grappeling hooks and rope. Obviously, no person witnessed such a dramatic escape despite the fact Dealy Plaza was filled with throngs of people.

I'm not sure what to make of Easterling's confession other to conclude it's not accurate. Was Hurt duped? Was Easterling a plant? I don't know. But the fact that Henry Hurt dedicated so much time and energy to Easterling is why I have to give this book a mere 3 stars.


Reasonable Doubt
Reasonable Doubt
by Henry Hurt
Edition: Hardcover
11 used & new from $3.99

3.0 out of 5 stars One fatal flaw prevents this from being the best introduction to the subject, September 14, 2009
This review is from: Reasonable Doubt (Hardcover)
Henry Hurt's "Reasonable Doubt" is an overview of the JFK assassination. Hurt was a researcher for the book "Legend: the Secret World of Lee Harvey Oswald" by Edward Epstein. Hurt's research involved little more than contacting US Marines who knew Oswald. After providing research for Epstein, Hurt set aside the JFK case.

In 1981, his odysessy started anew. A man named Robert Easterling contacted him. Easterling was prepared to confess his role in the assassination of President Kennedy. Hurt, in an effort to prepare himself for this unusual interview, Hurt versed himself in the JFK assassination lore.
Hurt's overview of the case is amazing. His prose is easy to follow. His conclusions are logical. The biggest flaw in his research is, unfortunately, the inclusion of the Robert Easterling testimony.

The first chapter reads like a newspaper report. It's nine pages of who, what, where and when. After finishing this, the reader knows the basics of the official story.

Hurt then turns a critical eye to the Warren Commission's findings. There is no index from which to review the Warren Commission's hearings and exhibits. The report is hardly the corrollary of 26 supporting volumes. Congressional committees concluded that the FBI and CIA were derelict in submitting evidence to the Warren Commission. The FBI had destroyed or altered testimony or evidence. Credible leads that pointed away from the Warren Commission's main thesis were ignored.

After concluding the Warren Commission had not settled the issue, Hurt then looks at the autopsy and the Magic Bullet. The doctors in Dallas do not agree with the doctors at Bethesda. The Magic Bullet is pristine whereas test bullets fired into cadavers show significant deformation.

The author spends the next two chapters looking at the Texas School Book Depository and Dealy Plaza in general. Could Oswald have moved that quickly from the 6th floor to the 2nd floor? Were there two men on the 6th floor when the shooting began? And were there shots fired from the grassy knoll? Hurt looks at many witnesses who either were not called to the Warren Commission to testify or whose testimony was not used to draw the conclusions that the Warren Commission drew.

The shooting of Dallas police officer JD Tippit has been called the "Rosetta Stone" of the JFK assassination. Hurt entitled chapter 7, "Tippit's Murder: Rosetta Stone or Red Herring?". He proceeds to cover ground that the Warren Commission covered and some ground that the Warren Commission ignored.

The Warren Commission concluded that Jack Ruby had no ties to organized crime. The House Select Committee on Assassinations concluded that Ruby did have ties to organized crime. Hurt examines this discrepency in chapter 8, "Jack Ruby: Pimp for all Seasons".

Oswald learned the Russian language while he was a US Marine. He was discharged from the USMC and then defected to the Soviet Union. When he came back to the US, he was an open Marxist and an outspoken supporter of Castro--in cities with strong conservative or strong intelligence ties (New Orleans and Dallas). Was Oswald affiliated with some branch of US intelligence? Hurt examines this in chapter 9, "Fingerprints of Intelligence".

The only case ever brought to court regarding the assassination of President Kennedy was the case brought forward by New Orleans Parish DA Jim Garrison. Oswald spent the summer of '63 in New Orleans. There are tantalizing connections between Oswald and elements of US intelligence including ex-Cuban patriots, Guy Bannister and David Ferrie. The author spends a considerable amount of time looking at Oswald's ties to New Orleans in chapter 10, "New Orleans, USA".

The last two chapters are a summation of the conspiracy information up to 1985, the year this book was published. The information is good. Hurt gives you the names of the researchers who put forward certain aspects of the case and how he feels about them. It is hard to disagree with Hurt--he calls them like he sees them. If a conspiracy theory is bizarre, he says so. This section of the book is particular good for the beginner. The beginner can get a brief review of the other researchers and their works here. This section can be used as a stepping stone to other areas of research the beginner may find interesting.

Alas, Henry Hurt's book, "Reasonable Doubt" has one glaring flaw. This flaw is chapter 12, "The Confession of Robert Easterling". Hurt dedicates almost 50 pages to the laugable premise that Robert Easterling was involved in a conspiracy to JFK. Easterling claims he was at a bar having a drink when an acquaintance of his named Manuel Rivera came up to him. He had not seen Rivera in some time so the men had a drink while making small talk. Then Manuel asked Easterling to be a part of a plot to Kennedy. This highly unlikely event is followed up with numerous other claims which not only are unsubstantiated but are completely based in fantasy.
Here's one example. Easterling claims that to make their escape, the real assassins repelled from the 6th floor of the Texas School Book Depository to the ground via grappeling hooks and rope. Obviously, no person witnessed such a dramatic escape despite the fact Dealy Plaza was filled with throngs of people.

I'm not sure what to make of Easterling's confession other to conclude it's not accurate. Was Hurt duped? Was Easterling a plant? I don't know. But the fact that Henry Hurt dedicated so much time and energy to Easterling is why I have to give this book a mere 3 stars.


No Title Available

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars One fatal flaw prevents this from being the best introduction to the subject, September 14, 2009
Henry Hurt's "Reasonable Doubt" is an overview of the JFK assassination. Hurt was a researcher for the book "Legend: the Secret World of Lee Harvey Oswald" by Edward Epstein. Hurt's research involved little more than contacting US Marines who knew Oswald. After providing research for Epstein, Hurt set aside the JFK case.

In 1981, his odysessy started anew. A man named Robert Easterling contacted him. Easterling was prepared to confess his role in the assassination of President Kennedy. Hurt, in an effort to prepare himself for this unusual interview, Hurt versed himself in the JFK assassination lore.
Hurt's overview of the case is amazing. His prose is easy to follow. His conclusions are logical. The biggest flaw in his research is, unfortunately, the inclusion of the Robert Easterling testimony.

The first chapter reads like a newspaper report. It's nine pages of who, what, where and when. After finishing this, the reader knows the basics of the official story.

Hurt then turns a critical eye to the Warren Commission's findings. There is no index from which to review the Warren Commission's hearings and exhibits. The report is hardly the corrollary of 26 supporting volumes. Congressional committees concluded that the FBI and CIA were derelict in submitting evidence to the Warren Commission. The FBI had destroyed or altered testimony or evidence. Credible leads that pointed away from the Warren Commission's main thesis were ignored.

After concluding the Warren Commission had not settled the issue, Hurt then looks at the autopsy and the Magic Bullet. The doctors in Dallas do not agree with the doctors at Bethesda. The Magic Bullet is pristine whereas test bullets fired into cadavers show significant deformation.

The author spends the next two chapters looking at the Texas School Book Depository and Dealy Plaza in general. Could Oswald have moved that quickly from the 6th floor to the 2nd floor? Were there two men on the 6th floor when the shooting began? And were there shots fired from the grassy knoll? Hurt looks at many witnesses who either were not called to the Warren Commission to testify or whose testimony was not used to draw the conclusions that the Warren Commission drew.

The shooting of Dallas police officer JD Tippit has been called the "Rosetta Stone" of the JFK assassination. Hurt entitled chapter 7, "Tippit's Murder: Rosetta Stone or Red Herring?". He proceeds to cover ground that the Warren Commission covered and some ground that the Warren Commission ignored.

The Warren Commission concluded that Jack Ruby had no ties to organized crime. The House Select Committee on Assassinations concluded that Ruby did have ties to organized crime. Hurt examines this discrepency in chapter 8, "Jack Ruby: Pimp for all Seasons".

Oswald learned the Russian language while he was a US Marine. He was discharged from the USMC and then defected to the Soviet Union. When he came back to the US, he was an open Marxist and an outspoken supporter of Castro--in cities with strong conservative or strong intelligence ties (New Orleans and Dallas). Was Oswald affiliated with some branch of US intelligence? Hurt examines this in chapter 9, "Fingerprints of Intelligence".

The only case ever brought to court regarding the assassination of President Kennedy was the case brought forward by New Orleans Parish DA Jim Garrison. Oswald spent the summer of '63 in New Orleans. There are tantalizing connections between Oswald and elements of US intelligence including ex-Cuban patriots, Guy Bannister and David Ferrie. The author spends a considerable amount of time looking at Oswald's ties to New Orleans in chapter 10, "New Orleans, USA".

The last two chapters are a summation of the conspiracy information up to 1985, the year this book was published. The information is good. Hurt gives you the names of the researchers who put forward certain aspects of the case and how he feels about them. It is hard to disagree with Hurt--he calls them like he sees them. If a conspiracy theory is bizarre, he says so. This section of the book is particular good for the beginner. The beginner can get a brief review of the other researchers and their works here. This section can be used as a stepping stone to other areas of research the beginner may find interesting.

Alas, Henry Hurt's book, "Reasonable Doubt" has one glaring flaw. This flaw is chapter 12, "The Confession of Robert Easterling". Hurt dedicates almost 50 pages to the laugable premise that Robert Easterling was involved in a conspiracy to JFK. Easterling claims he was at a bar having a drink when an acquaintance of his named Manuel Rivera came up to him. He had not seen Rivera in some time so the men had a drink while making small talk. Then Manuel asked Easterling to be a part of a plot to Kennedy. This highly unlikely event is followed up with numerous other claims which not only are unsubstantiated but are completely based in fantasy.
Here's one example. Easterling claims that to make their escape, the real assassins repelled from the 6th floor of the Texas School Book Depository to the ground via grappeling hooks and rope. Obviously, no person witnessed such a dramatic escape despite the fact Dealy Plaza was filled with throngs of people.

I'm not sure what to make of Easterling's confession other to conclude it's not accurate. Was Hurt duped? Was Easterling a plant? I don't know. But the fact that Henry Hurt dedicated so much time and energy to Easterling is why I have to give this book a mere 3 stars.


Reasonable Doubt: An Investigation into the Assassination of John F. Kennedy
Reasonable Doubt: An Investigation into the Assassination of John F. Kennedy
by Henry Hurt
Edition: Paperback
52 used & new from $0.01

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars One fatal flaw prevents this from being the best introduction to the subject, September 13, 2009
Henry Hurt's "Reasonable Doubt" is an overview of the JFK assassination. Hurt was a researcher for the book "Legend: the Secret World of Lee Harvey Oswald" by Edward Epstein. Hurt's research involved little more than contacting US Marines who knew Oswald. After providing research for Epstein, Hurt set aside the JFK case.

In 1981, his odysessy started anew. A man named Robert Easterling contacted him. Easterling was prepared to confess his role in the assassination of President Kennedy. Hurt, in an effort to prepare himself for this unusual interview, Hurt versed himself in the JFK assassination lore.

Hurt's overview of the case is amazing. His prose is easy to follow. His conclusions are logical. The biggest flaw in his research is, unfortunately, the inclusion of the Robert Easterling testimony.

The first chapter reads like a newspaper report. It's nine pages of who, what, where and when. After finishing this, the reader knows the basics of the official story.

Hurt then turns a critical eye to the Warren Commission's findings. There is no index from which to review the Warren Commission's hearings and exhibits. The report is hardly the corrollary of 26 supporting volumes. Congressional committees concluded that the FBI and CIA were derelict in submitting evidence to the Warren Commission. The FBI had destroyed or altered testimony or evidence. Credible leads that pointed away from the Warren Commission's main thesis were ignored.

After concluding the Warren Commission had not settled the issue, Hurt then looks at the autopsy and the Magic Bullet. The doctors in Dallas do not agree with the doctors at Bethesda. The Magic Bullet is pristine whereas test bullets fired into cadavers show significant deformation.

The author spends the next two chapters looking at the Texas School Book Depository and Dealy Plaza in general. Could Oswald have moved that quickly from the 6th floor to the 2nd floor? Were there two men on the 6th floor when the shooting began? And were there shots fired from the grassy knoll? Hurt looks at many witnesses who either were not called to the Warren Commission to testify or whose testimony was not used to draw the conclusions that the Warren Commission drew.

The shooting of Dallas police officer JD Tippit has been called the "Rosetta Stone" of the JFK assassination. Hurt entitled chapter 7, "Tippit's Murder: Rosetta Stone or Red Herring?". He proceeds to cover ground that the Warren Commission covered and some ground that the Warren Commission ignored.

The Warren Commission concluded that Jack Ruby had no ties to organized crime. The House Select Committee on Assassinations concluded that Ruby did have ties to organized crime. Hurt examines this discrepency in chapter 8, "Jack Ruby: Pimp for all Seasons".

Oswald learned the Russian language while he was a US Marine. He was discharged from the USMC and then defected to the Soviet Union. When he came back to the US, he was an open Marxist and an outspoken supporter of Castro--in cities with strong conservative or strong intelligence ties (New Orleans and Dallas). Was Oswald affiliated with some branch of US intelligence? Hurt examines this in chapter 9, "Fingerprints of Intelligence".

The only case ever brought to court regarding the assassination of President Kennedy was the case brought forward by New Orleans Parish DA Jim Garrison. Oswald spent the summer of '63 in New Orleans. There are tantalizing connections between Oswald and elements of US intelligence including ex-Cuban patriots, Guy Bannister and David Ferrie. The author spends a considerable amount of time looking at Oswald's ties to New Orleans in chapter 10, "New Orleans, USA".

The last two chapters are a summation of the conspiracy information up to 1985, the year this book was published. The information is good. Hurt gives you the names of the researchers who put forward certain aspects of the case and how he feels about them. It is hard to disagree with Hurt--he calls them like he sees them. If a conspiracy theory is bizarre, he says so. This section of the book is particular good for the beginner. The beginner can get a brief review of the other researchers and their works here. This section can be used as a stepping stone to other areas of research the beginner may find interesting.

Alas, Henry Hurt's book, "Reasonable Doubt" has one glaring flaw. This flaw is chapter 12, "The Confession of Robert Easterling". Hurt dedicates almost 50 pages to the laugable premise that Robert Easterling was involved in a conspiracy to JFK. Easterling claims he was at a bar having a drink when an acquaintance of his named Manuel Rivera came up to him. He had not seen Rivera in some time so the men had a drink while making small talk. Then Manuel asked Easterling to be a part of a plot to Kennedy. This highly unlikely event is followed up with numerous other claims which not only are unsubstantiated but are completely based in fantasy. Here's one example. Easterling claims that to make their escape, the real assassins repelled from the 6th floor of the Texas School Book Depository to the ground via grappeling hooks and rope. Obviously, no person witnessed such a dramatic escape despite the fact Dealy Plaza was filled with throngs of people.

I'm not sure what to make of Easterling's confession other to conclude it's not accurate. Was Hurt duped? Was Easterling a plant? I don't know. But the fact that Henry Hurt dedicated so much time and energy to Easterling is why I have to give this book a mere 3 stars.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 29, 2013 2:58 PM PDT


South Park: Season 12
South Park: Season 12
DVD ~ Trey Parker
Offered by MightySilver
Price: $19.99
70 used & new from $9.53

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Another satirical take on society from Matt and Trey, March 24, 2009
This review is from: South Park: Season 12 (DVD)
Yet another raunchy, raucous season in rural Colorado! This season the four boys (Cartman, Kenny, Kyle and Stan) deal with AIDS, the paparazzi, being taken hostage and the 2008 election. Through the satiric and vulgar eyes of creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone, the viewers will see these four foul-mouthed boys go on zany adventures.

Besides the comic value, the other strength of South Park is its satirical take on society. Take the episode "Over Logging" for example. Americans spend way too much time in front of the computer. Trey and Matt show a satirical dystopia where the absence of internet turns our society into a post-apocalyptic world.

The past 12 seasons of South Park have been a hilarious ride. Unfortunately, the show is losing steam. The writers are falling back on vulgarity as a vessel for their comedy now instead of something fresh. Perhaps the show's lack of freshness has left them no choice. Still South Park is one of the funnier shows around. And Matt and Trey certainly have more material in them for other projects.

#1 Tonsil Trouble
Cartman goes to the doctor to have his tonsils removed only to learn he contracted AIDS during the surgery. When Kyle finds Cartman's illness hilarious, Cartman devises a plan to give Kyle AIDS as well. The episode looks at the AIDS virus and shows the gaps in our medical coverage (such as the rich get better treatment).

#2 Britney's New Look
The boys have a plan to get some quick cash: become paparazzi and stalk Britney Spears. The pressure from the paparazzi is too great for Britney and she tries to kill herself. Matt and Trey take a not-to-sober look at the cult of the tabloid media.

#3 Major Boobage
Mr. Mackey gives the class a lecture on drugs in an effort to scare them away from narcotics. But as always, Mr. Mackey is inept and the boys are seduced by the idea of getting high. Well, Kenny anyway. This episode pokes fun of all the trendy ways to get high, suggesting they are nothing more than sniffing cat urine.

#4 Canada on Strike
Matt and Trey can't keep their scathing humor away from our neighbors to the north. This time the Canadians are going on strike unless their monetary demands are met.

#5 Eek! A Penis!
Mr. Garrison realizes he has been a man all along. He hears he can have a new penis using modern surgery. Meanwhile, Cartman takes over the class and proves his mettle as a teacher. Matt and Trey take a swipe at modern medicine and the new procedures where animals grow human organs.

#6 Over Logging
When the internet goes down, America turns into a post-apocalyptic nightmare. Internet usage is rationed out by armed guards and people are put into internet stockade zones. Matt and Trey give us a hyperbolic take on how much the internet affects our lives now.

#7 Super Fun Time
My favorite episode from this season and probably the funniest one to boot. The class goes on a field trip to a lame theme park. Then the park is taken over and everyone is taken hostage. This episode spoofs many movies where there are heists and hostage situations. Hilarious!

#8 The China Problem
When Lucas and Spielberg foul up the Indiana Jones series with the dreadful "The Kingdom of the Crystal Skull", Trey and Matt skewer them alive. The boys are convinced that Spielberg and Lucas need to be prosecuted for raping Indiana Jones. Lesson: don't foul up anything Matt Stone and Trey Parker like!

#9 Breast Cancer Show Ever
Cartman irreverently laughs at all of Wendy's efforts in raising awareness for breast cancer. Wendy has had enough of Cartman, citing obliquely the past 11 seasons of Cartman's intolerance. The fight is on and it's going to be Cartman versus Wendy! I really think the purpose of the episode was to take Cartman down a notch. There was no satire, no lessons--just Wendy kicking Cartman's butt.

#10 & #11 Pandemic Parts I and II
The boys have another hare-brained scheme to make money: assume the roles of a Peruvian pan flute band and play for money. Alas, the true nature of the Peruvian pan flute bands is only known to the evil Director of Homeland Security. The boys are taken to Peru (where, incidentally, they believe Indiana Jones was raped). Matt and Trey reflect on the power of the government in times of emergency.

#12 About Last Night...
Election 2008 has come to South Park, Colorado. And the acrimonious election is even more exaggerated in rural Colorado. Obama supporters party until they are hospitalized; McCain supporters attempt suicide. Meanwhile, the truth of the election is that McCain and Obama had plans to steal the Hope Diamond. The power that presidential elections have over us is considerable; and Matt and Trey spoof it in this episode.

#13 Elementary School Musical
The popularity of "High School Musical" captures the attention of all the kids at South Park Elementary. All the kids, that is, except our favorite four boys. Stan and the rest do not get the popularity of these lame movies. But in order to be popular, they succumb to peer pressure. Indeed, the final song is a satirical take on peer pressure: "You got to do what you want to do/just make sure it's popular with everyone".

#14 The Ungroundable
Another teen movie captures the attention of the children at South Park. This time it's Twilight. And all the kids want to be vampires. This episode is more of a Butters episode than any other one this season. Butters wants desperately to be a vampire so he cannot be grounded anymore.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 9, 2009 12:51 PM PDT


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