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Parker Rose "Parker" RSS Feed (Casper, Wyoming)

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The Kid: The Immortal Life of Ted Williams
The Kid: The Immortal Life of Ted Williams
Offered by Hachette Book Group
Price: $12.99

5.0 out of 5 stars A Must for any true BB fan - especially a Red Sox fan!, February 20, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Very detailed, well-written, very good.


Ecoland Men's Organic Cotton No Show Loafer Liner Socks - 3 Pack
Ecoland Men's Organic Cotton No Show Loafer Liner Socks - 3 Pack
Offered by Ecoland Inc.
Price: $27.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not Very Good, September 8, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I wear a size twelve shoe and these did not do the job at all. As soon as I started walking with them, they slipped. I have not found a pair of "no-show" socks that do what they are supposed to do.

Parker Rose


The 3...Qd8 Scandinavian: Simple and Strong
The 3...Qd8 Scandinavian: Simple and Strong
by Daniel Lowinger
Edition: Paperback
Price: $20.18
39 used & new from $14.81

6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good, solid stuff, December 29, 2013
To my knowledge, this is the first full book on this line of the Scandinavian. This may be the author's first chess book, but he has done quite a good job. The book is structured well. It starts with a historical background and a discussion of why the line has had clouds hanging over it.

Rather than give just one line, there are several variations for black thar are explored. But the reader is not left hanging. Lowinger clearly gives the pros and cons of the lines as well as his preferences.

Unlike many opening books, there are a lot of explanations of the ideas involved. The entire line is covered pretty well. Note that it does not cover lines other than those in the 3...Qd8 Scandinavian, I.e., after 1.e4 d5 2.exd5 Qxd5, none of the less common third moves by white (such as Nf3 or d4) are covered.

All in all, a solid five out of five.

Parker Rose


Zurich 1953: 15 Contenders for the World Chess Championship
Zurich 1953: 15 Contenders for the World Chess Championship
Price: $22.05

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Wonderful Book, June 22, 2012
To be honest, I did not know that this book even existed. But just prior to its release, there had been a "buzz" generated about it. When I received it, I found out why. It is a great book! Without taking anything away from Bronstein's terrific book on the same tournament, I think I agree with Andy Soltis who explains why, in his foreword to the book, he thinks it is better than Bronstein's. After having received the book (and also already having Bronstein's) I am inclined to agree.

Each round (there are thirty) has a complete description of what takes place in that round, a summary of the standings and other interesting information about the players. The comments by Najdorf are thorough and easy to follow.

The first part of the book contains a short intro by Yuri Averbakh (who actually played in the tournament!) and each player is presented by a bio with a review of his career up to the time of the Zurich 1953 tournament. There are a good number of photos. The production is top-notch, using figurine algebraic notation and plenty of diagrams.

This belongs in every chess player's collection.

Parker Rose
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 22, 2013 2:22 PM PST


Zurich 1953: 15 Contenders for the World Chess Championship
Zurich 1953: 15 Contenders for the World Chess Championship
by Miguel Najdorf
Edition: Paperback
Price: $23.21
18 used & new from $19.08

13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Wonderful Book, June 22, 2012
To be honest, I did not know that this book even existed. But just prior to its release, there had been a "buzz" generated about it. When I received it, I found out why. It is a great book! Without taking anything away from Bronstein's terrific book on the same tournament, I think I agree with Andy Soltis who explains why, in his foreword to the book, he thinks it is better than Bronstein's. After having received the book (and also already having Bronstein's) I am inclined to agree.

Each round (there are thirty) has a complete description of what takes place in that round, a summary of the standings and other interesting information about the players. The comments by Najdorf are thorough and easy to follow.

The first part of the book contains a short intro by Yuri Averbakh (who actually played in the tournament!) and each player is presented by a bio with a review of his career up to the time of the Zurich 1953 tournament. There are a good number of photos. The production is top-notch, using figurine algebraic notation and plenty of diagrams.

This belongs in every chess player's collection.

Parker Rose


Grandmaster Repertoire 3 - The English Opening vol. 1
Grandmaster Repertoire 3 - The English Opening vol. 1
by Mihail Marin
Edition: Paperback
19 used & new from $29.95

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Extremely comprehensive, poor production, April 10, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Mihail Marin's three-volume series on the English is incredibly deep and thorough, so much so that unless you are master strength, it may just overwhelm you. The set is basically an opening repertoire for White, i.e., it could have been called something like "White to play and win with the English."

The depth of the analysis is staggering, presenting the reader with a very real practical problem: how to best make use and take command of the 1000+ pages contained in the three volumes. This is no mean task, as Marin, a superb author and analyst by any standard, clearly has done a tremendous amount of work and research to produce what surely will be regarded as his opus magnum.

Having three or for variations appearing around move 20 or so is more the norm than the exception. Marin spares no effort to probe the secrets of every line and thematic concept. He complements the presentation with original analysis and suggestions. But how a player interested in using these books for actually playing the English should proceed is not in this case a frivolous question.

This practical problem is further exacerbated by an unfortunate omission by the author to offer any guidelines about how to use the books. Acknowledging the complexity and challenge the densely packed material present by including several pages in each volume explaining author's recommended use of the material would have gone a long way to help and guide the reader. As it stands now, the reader, especially the less experienced or weaker (under ELO 2000) player, runs the risk of being so completely overwhelmed by the tsunami of information that the decision might be made to move on to other, more easily grasped material.

To some degree, that would be a shame, for Marin has done five-star work with these books. But extracting meaningful interaction from them may certainly pose a daunting dilemma for many readers. In addition to presenting a practical, meaningful road map for these books, the author (or perhaps more accurately the publisher) could have made these books much more user-friendly by repeating all the introductory moves before setting out material for yet another sub-variation. By this I mean, for example, that the reader is faced with many variations and sub-sets that occur after the 10th or 15th move of a given line. The variation in question is headed just by the move itself.

Let's say after White's 17th move, there are four possible responses by Black that the author presents. It would have extremely helpful before each of the possible black replies on the 17th move, if the all moves from the very beginning were given. The way it stands now, one has to flip back searching for the moves that lead up to the move discussed. That sounds simple, but in fact when you are on move 17 and there have been four major variations each with four choices, it can become quite a chore. True, not many opening books use this technique, bit with material this complicated and confusingly similar, it should have been done here.

Finally, two of the three volumes that I own are already falling apart. The pages are simply falling out. This tends to be happening toward the back of the book, but of course it should not be happening at all. I should also mention that I have encountered this problem -- some form of poor or flawed binding -- with other books by this publisher.

So, we have five stars for the content, three for the presentation and one for the production...overall, three stars.

Parker R.


Grandmaster Repertoire 4: The English Opening
Grandmaster Repertoire 4: The English Opening
by Mihail Marin
Edition: Paperback
Price: $26.47
43 used & new from $16.95

14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Extremely comprehensive, poor production, April 10, 2011
Mihail Marin's three-volume series on the English is incredibly deep and thorough, so much so that unless you are master strength, it may just overwhelm you. The set is basically an opening repertoire for White, i.e., it could have been called something like "White to play and win with the English."

The depth of the analysis is staggering, presenting the reader with a very real practical problem: how to best make use and take command of the 1000+ pages contained in the three volumes. This is no mean task, as Marin, a superb author and analyst by any standard, clearly has done a tremendous amount of work and research to produce what surely will be regarded as his opus magnum.

Having three or for variations appearing around move 20 or so is more the norm than the exception. Marin spares no effort to probe the secrets of every line and thematic concept. He complements the presentation with original analysis and suggestions. But how a player interested in using these books for actually playing the English should proceed is not in this case a frivolous question.

This practical problem is further exacerbated by an unfortunate omission by the author to offer any guidelines about how to use the books. Acknowledging the complexity and challenge the densely packed material present by including several pages in each volume explaining author's recommended use of the material would have gone a long way to help and guide the reader. As it stands now, the reader, especially the less experienced or weaker (under ELO 2000) player, runs the risk of being so completely overwhelmed by the tsunami of information that the decision might be made to move on to other, more easily grasped material.

To some degree, that would be a shame, for Marin has done five-star work with these books. But extracting meaningful interaction from them may certainly pose a daunting dilemma for many readers. In addition to presenting a practical, meaningful road map for these books, the author (or perhaps more accurately the publisher) could have made these books much more user-friendly by repeating all the introductory moves before setting out material for yet another sub-variation. By this I mean, for example, that the reader is faced with many variations and sub-sets that occur after the 10th or 15th move of a given line. The variation in question is headed just by the move itself.

Let's say after White's 17th move, there are four possible responses by Black that the author presents. It would have extremely helpful before each of the possible black replies on the 17th move, if the all moves from the very beginning were given. The way it stands now, one has to flip back searching for the moves that lead up to the move discussed. That sounds simple, but in fact when you are on move 17 and there have been four major variations each with four choices, it can become quite a chore. True, not many opening books use this technique, bit with material this complicated and confusingly similar, it should have been done here.

Finally, two of the three volumes that I own are already falling apart. The pages are simply falling out. This tends to be happening toward the back of the book, but of course it should not be happening at all. I should also mention that I have encountered this problem -- some form of poor or flawed binding -- with other books by this publisher.

So, we have five stars for the content, three for the presentation and one for the production...overall, three stars.

Parker R.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 8, 2014 1:14 PM PDT


Grandmaster Repertoire 5: The English Opening
Grandmaster Repertoire 5: The English Opening
by Mihail Marin
Edition: Paperback
Price: $25.52
44 used & new from $16.14

20 of 25 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Extraordinarily comprehensive, poor production, April 10, 2011
Mihail Marin's three-volume series on the English is incredibly deep and thorough, so much so that unless you are master strength, it may just overwhelm you. The set is basically an opening repertoire for White, i.e., it could have been called something like "White to play and win with the English."

The depth of the analysis is staggering, presenting the reader with a very real practical problem: how to best make use and take command of the 1000+ pages contained in the three volumes. This is no mean task, as Marin, a superb author and analyst by any standard, clearly has done a tremendous amount of work and research to produce what surely will be regarded as his opus magnum.

Having three or for variations appearing around move 20 or so is more the norm than the exception. Marin spares no effort to probe the secrets of every line and thematic concept. He complements the presentation with original analysis and suggestions. But how a player interested in using these books for actually playing the English should proceed is not in this case a frivolous question.

This practical problem is further exacerbated by an unfortunate omission by the author to offer any guidelines about how to use the books. Acknowledging the complexity and challenge the densely packed material present by including several pages in each volume explaining author's recommended use of the material would have gone a long way to help and guide the reader. As it stands now, the reader, especially the less experienced or weaker (under ELO 2000) player, runs the risk of being so completely overwhelmed by the tsunami of information that the decision might be made to move on to other, more easily grasped material.

To some degree, that would be a shame, for Marin has done five-star work with these books. But extracting meaningful interaction from them may certainly pose a daunting dilemma for many readers. In addition to presenting a practical, meaningful road map for these books, the author (or perhaps more accurately the publisher) could have made these books much more user-friendly by repeating all the introductory moves before setting out material for yet another sub-variation. By this I mean, for example, that the reader is faced with many variations and sub-sets that occur after the 10th or 15th move of a given line. The variation in question is headed just by the move itself.

Let's say after White's 17th move, there are four possible responses by Black that the author presents. It would have extremely helpful before each of the possible black replies on the 17th move, if the all moves from the very beginning were given. The way it stands now, one has to flip back searching for the moves that lead up to the move discussed. That sounds simple, but in fact when you are on move 17 and there have been four major variations each with four choices, it can become quite a chore. True, not many opening books use this technique, bit with material this complicated and confusingly similar, it should have been done here.

Finally, two of the three volumes that I own are already falling apart. The pages are simply falling out. This tends to be happening toward the back of the book, but of course it should not be happening at all. I should also mention that I have encountered this problem -- some form of poor or flawed binding -- with other books by this publisher.

So, we have five stars for the content, three for the presentation and one for the production...overall, three stars.

Parker R.
Comment Comments (5) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Dec 20, 2014 1:45 PM PST


Paul Morphy: A Modern Perspective
Paul Morphy: A Modern Perspective
by Valeri Beim
Edition: Paperback
21 used & new from $54.50

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Excellent Look at Morphy from a Modern Grandmaster, January 1, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
What a pleasure is book is! Austrian ( former Soviet) grandmaster Valeri Beim subjects the genius of Paul Morphy's games to modern scrutiny and analysis. The result is a fascinating book about the19th-century hAmericam genius. The author takes the time to carefully -- but very understandably -- examine all aspects of Morphy's games, from dynamic openings and brilliant combinations to his solid endgame play.

If you want to know about Morphy's life, read Lawson. If you want to know about Morph'y games, this is the book for you.

Parker R.


The Fascinating King's Gambit
The Fascinating King's Gambit
by Thomas Johansson
Edition: Paperback
Price: $30.65
39 used & new from $21.99

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good Content, Poor Production, January 1, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
A respectable effort on the King's Bishop Gambit is marred by a very poor production along with questionable editing decisions. The book is physically much too large, aprroximately12x9. This is a nice size for a kid's coloring book, but a terrible size for a chess book. The practical effect is to make it extremely awkward to use to play through the lines on a chessboard with the book in front of you.

The format also means that there is a very large amount of material on each page. The reader could have been greatly assisted by the judicious use of bold and italic styles, with nomal font, but bold is used rarely, italics not at all. That coupled with far fewer diagrams than were really needed makes for a book that requires a lot of effort just to work through. One wonders if the publisher (Trafford) has any meaningful experience bringing out chess books.

If the content had not been as good as it is, this would have been a "two-star" effort, no more.

Parker R.


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