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Omega Speedmaster Professional Grey Side of the Moon Chronograph Automatic Sandblasted Platinum Dial Grey Leather Mens Watch 31193445199001
Omega Speedmaster Professional Grey Side of the Moon Chronograph Automatic Sandblasted Platinum Dial Grey Leather Mens Watch 31193445199001
Offered by WatchMaxx
Price: $9,314.29
5 used & new from $9,314.29

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Omega Grey Side of the Moon Wrist Watch, May 29, 2016
The Grey Side of the Moon is a modern Omega watch - sapphire crystal front and back, solid grey ceramic (injection molded) case and other parts, and genuine platinum dials. It has its distinct look, and that look will suit some folks and not others. My GSotM keeps time to about 2/3 of one second per day - phenomenal for a mechanical watch! The leather band is reinforced around the holes to prevent the holes from being stretched and deformed, and the loop holding the end of the band locks into the end hole - a great feature! The band fits me on the third hole, and goes 5 holes larger - a very good range of adjustment. The nighttime glow lasts all night long. All things considered, a very nice watch, but expensive at $12k retail.
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Puro Sound Labs BT5200 Studio Grade Bluetooth Wireless Headphones - The Healthy Ears Headphone (Black)
Puro Sound Labs BT5200 Studio Grade Bluetooth Wireless Headphones - The Healthy Ears Headphone (Black)
Offered by Puro Sound Labs
Price: $129.99

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Puro BT5200 On-Ear Bluetooth Stereo Headphone review, April 26, 2016
Sources: iPhone6s+ with Oppo HA-2/FiiO E17k DAC/amps, various computers using the Audioquest Dragonfly-2 DAC/amp.

Going right to the sound: In Bluetooth mode, the BT5200's bass is not especially emphasized as are many popular headphones these days, but that bass goes ultra-deep with a strong weight, even to 16 hz. The mids aren't forward, and in fact may be slightly soft, as is the treble (slightly, with good detail). When you read the comments in the 25 music selections below, you'll understand just how good this sound is. For portable use, it couldn't be better, and I'd guess that many audiophiles would be willing to use the BT5200 at home as-is, or with minor tone control adjustments to suit their personal taste. In passive (wired) mode, the bass is emphasized and the treble softer, and I would not describe that sound as audiophile necessarily, although for portable use, even the passive-mode sound is decent. Note: This is a good result for a $200-$250 Bluetooth headphone, and simply fabulous at the BT5200's price. And I haven't even gotten to the build quality and accessories yet.

To test the BT5200 Bluetooth quality, I paired it with my iPhone 6s-plus, and placed the phone at one end of my apartment. I walked into several other rooms including laundry and bath rooms, A/C enclosures etc., up to 35 feet from the phone, and the signal was clean and perfect, except for one momentary glitch in the farthest room 35 feet away. I've used a couple other Bluetooth headphones, and only one (the pricy one) could do as well. In all other cases, within 30 feet at least, I've never gotten even a small glitch in the sound. Isolation is average or better for a good-quality closed headphone, so if I'm walking in a park close to a busy freeway, as long as I'm a reasonable distance from the traffic (~75 yards or so), I can have a good low-noise listening experience. There are headphones that aren't noise-canceling that have higher isolation, but those are not at all comfortable. Leakage is low enough that the BT5200 can be used in a public library or quiet office if the playback volume isn't extreme.

For wired use, the BT5200 includes a flat-ribbon cable about 3.5 ft long. The left earcup has a jack for the included charging cord (USB-A to MicroUSB) and headphone cable, as well as the Bluetooth on-off switch and volume up-down buttons. Also on the left earcup is a large round Bluetooth button, but what purpose it serves I don't know since I always got quick pairing with just the on-off switch. I've read where a few users have had trouble pairing the BT5200, but I've had no problem or any delays, so I'd suggest for them that they consult the headphone forums and try to find what's going on with their gear. The headband has some spongy padding, and the on-ear type earpads are very soft and squishy, and covered in a high-quality pleather. The clamping force is enough to make the headphone secure on the head for average movements, and even though the BT5200 is very light for its high-quality build, users who aren't familiar with the better on-ear headphones may feel some pressure until they get used to it.

I rate the BT5200 near the top of my list of comfortable headphones, and I've had no need to do anything to the headband for a better fit. Some users of other brands report that their headphones' headbands put too much pressure on their heads, and so I have two suggestions just in case: One, place the earpads on your ears and then rotate the headband back and forth slightly until you hit the right spot. Two, pull the earcups down just a tad extra to let them carry more of the already light weight, so less is carried by the headband. The headband's range of adjustment is 1/2 inch smaller on each side and 3/4 inch larger on each side from where it fits my average size head, and that's an excellent range of adjustment. A zippered hard-shell carrycase is included for portability when you don't want to wear it around your neck. I don't use the case unless I'm traveling, because it's much more convenient to carry the headphone around my neck when not listening.

In previous reviews I've included music examples with comments about how the headphones sound with each track. My suggestion is instead of reading each one as an absolute unto itself, you could compare my notes here to other reviews containing those tracks and see how the BT5200 compares with each individual track. NOTE: The BT5200 was evaluated above and below in Bluetooth mode, without any tone controls or equalization.

Animotion - Obsession (1980's New Wave/Techno): The upper bass synth has excellent detail and tone, and both male and female vocals sound natural without favoring either. The BT5200 plays this very well.

Bauhaus - Bela Lugosi's Dead (~1980): Strong midrange sound effects - this is a good worst-case test for resonant-type sounds in the most sensitive midrange area. Handled very well by the BT5200.

Beethoven Symphony 9, Solti/CSO (1972): Excellent overall sound. Of special note here are the bass impacts beginning around 10:30 of the fourth movement. Those impacts are soft and well in the background, but you can really feel the weight they carry with the BT5200.

Black Sabbath - Iron Man (Classic Rock): Very good instrumental detail and the vocal sounds very natural. As with most classic rock tracks, there is very little or no deep bass. The BT5200 plays this music very smoothly, and the lack of deep bass doesn't unbalance the treble.

Boz Scaggs - Lowdown (1976): Great sound quality - this is a good test for any nasality in the midrange. Handled very well by the BT5200.

Cantus - Danny Boy (Traditional/Male Choral/Acapella): The BT5200 plays the voices with enough low end warmth and weight to sound very natural, yet there is no added emphasis of the lower register of the male voices on this track.

Cath Carroll - Moves Like You (1980's New Wave/Techno): This track's percussion and voice are crisp and well-balanced, and there's a good sense of space or soundstage around the voices and instruments. The BT5200 reproduces the space and detail very well.

Catherine Wheel - Black Metallic (~1991): Goth with industrial overtones - I like this since it's a great music composition and the sound effects are smoothly integrated into the mix. This may sound distorted or mushy with some headphones, but the BT5200 renders the deliberate instrumental distortions clearly.

Chris Isaak - Wicked Game (Pop/Rock): The BT5200 plays this high treble energy recording very smoothly - the voice and instruments are very detailed but not edgy - very musical in fact.

Chromatics - I'm On Fire (Synth-Pop, female lead): This track has a good amount of space around the voice and instruments, making for a very pleasant stereo image. The voice is excellent, and the tambourine sound is clearly identifiable.

David Hazeltine - Fur Elise (Jazz): A very high-quality recording from HDTracks. The BT5200 reproduces the instruments smoothly with a spacious ambiance. The wire-brush-on-cymbal harmonics are extended and detailed.

Grieg (Beecham-Royal Philharmonic) - Peer Gynt-Solveig's Lullaby (Classical): This very old (late 1950's) stereo recording must have been made on the most expensive gear in the world, since the overall sound quality and especially Ilse Hollweg's amazing voice are as close to "being there" as I've heard with some of the better classical recordings made since the year 2000. The BT5200 plays this music perfectly.

Hans Zimmer - Dark Knight-Aggressive Expansion (Soundtrack): The percussion in this track hits really hard, and the bass tones beginning around 0:45 have the ultra-deep "shuddery" kind of sound that indicates a solid deep-bass response. The BT5200's response is ideal here.

Heaven 17 - Let Me Go (1980's New Wave/Techno): The bass instrument (guitar?) has excellent detail, and the voices and ambiance have a "you are there" quality that's uncommon in early 1980's pop music. The BT5200 plays this track perfectly.

Hugo Audiophile - 15-16 (Electronic): I'm not sure what the 15-16 stands for - perhaps track numbers from a CD album. The deep-bass tones that start around 33-34 seconds into the track reproduce very well with the BT5200. This is a great recording for evaluating whether a headphone's bass will be sufficient for most environments, since for many headphones that have a weaker bass, the deep bass gets absorbed and mostly lost when the environment contains a lot of low-frequency energy.

Jimmy Smith - Basin Street Blues (early 60's): This track has several loud crescendos of brass and other instruments that don't sound clean and musical with some headphones. The BT5200 provides excellent reproduction. Listen particularly to the second crescendo at 15 seconds in for best-case detail. I'd like to emphasize that these crescendos are probably the worst-case test I have for instrument separation and detail, and the BT5200 does those very well.

Kellogg Auditorium, Battle Creek Michigan, Aeolian-Skinner Organ (1933) - Pedal, 32', Resultant, Arpeggio: This 16 hz organ pedal tone differs from other music tones in that you won't "hear" the tone - you'll only feel it. Although most music tones have harmonics (including this one), the harmonics from this tone will be too weak to provide any "feel", so whatever you actually hear would not be part of the fundamental 16 hz tone. There are ~30 hz sounds in the outdoor environment in big cities, generated by large trucks, buses, and subway trains, and they have a quality of "rumble" that's similar to some deep-bass tones found in music. This 16 hz organ tone is easily distinguished from those sounds when compared on a headphone that has good undistorted response at 16 hz. The BT5200 plays the fundamental tone with a very solid weight and surprisingly good detail.

Mantovani - Sunrise Sunset (Easy Listening, ca. 1972): A master musician and conductor** who specialized in light classics and orchestral pop music, Mantovani's accomplishments were overshadowed by music critics who couldn't tolerate the notion of "light classics" or "semi-classical" music, even when those recordings were no threat to the classical music genres. In any case the later Mantovani recordings from the mid-1960's through mid-1970's had the advantage of being mixed for much better hi-fi systems than those which the music critics possessed at the start of the Long Playing (LP) record cycle. Here in 2016, at least some of those digital remasters have improved the sound further, although it's not always the case. This track as played on the BT5200 is a perfect example of the sheer musicality lurking in those later recordings, and is highly recommended for soundstage, instrumental tone, and musical balance.

**Mantovani developed the "Cascading Strings" sonic effect circa 1950, a famous "Wall of Sound" effect for mono hi-fi systems that predated Phil Spector's own famous Wall of Sound effect by 10 years or so.

Michael Tilson Thomas - Rhapsody In Blue (20th Century Classic): Great sound and soundstage, and terrific piano playing and tone. There are some very deep bass impacts starting around 38 seconds into the 17:24 length track, and the weight of those impacts is appreciable with the BT5200.

Pinback - Non Photo Blue (Pop-Rock): Crispy sound with "crunchy guitars and bashing drums" - the BT5200 renders this music as perfectly as I've heard an energetic pop-rock recording played with any headphone.

Porcupine Tree - Trains (Pop-Rock): This track opens with some nicely-detailed string sounds and a forward-sounding male voice with a higher-than-average register. There are a series of "clip-clop" effects starting at 3:19 that should sound like they were made with wooden blocks of some kind. The BT5200 reproduction of the 'clop' effect is very good.

Richard Strauss (Mester-Pasadena) - Also Sprach Zarathustra (opening) (Classical): The granddaddy of bass is in the opening 1:50 of this recording, and I've heard it only once on a large and expensive loudspeaker system in Cleveland. For most people, that experience would be indistinguishable from being in a fairly strong earthquake. The BT5200 conveys as much of that experience as I've heard with a typical $400 headphone. The tympani also have good impact here.

Scarlatti-Kipnis - Sonata in E Major K381 (Classical, Harpsichord): The harpsichord here is normally fairly bright and detailed, but the BT5200 softens the tones and transients somewhat.

Tiger Okoshi - Bootsman's Little House (Jazz): The trumpet here is recorded fairly close up and has a significant "bite". The BT5200's reproduction is very good, and the close-miked piano is also a treat. For comparison, I have several Maynard Ferguson tracks that feature a similarly strong trumpet with lots of brassy bite.

Trombone Shorty - Backatown (Jazz-Funk): The deep bass impacts here are strong, and work very well with the horns and other instruments. The BT5200 delivers the impacts with good weight and detail, and the horns have the kind of bite that gives them a wonderfully realistic sound.
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Master & Dynamic MH30 On Ear Headphone - Gunmetal
Master & Dynamic MH30 On Ear Headphone - Gunmetal
Price: $323.99
19 used & new from $246.10

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Master & Dynamic MH-30 Luxury On-Ear Stereo Headphone review by Dale, March 31, 2016
Edit 6 May 2016: It's obvious now from my reviews of this headphone that I'm getting "troll votes" here and elsewhere. It would be best to read the whole review, because I cover specific features of fit and sound with emphasis on telling customers what they need to know.

Sources: iPhone6s+ with Oppo HA-2/FiiO K1 DAC/amps, various computers using the Audioquest Dragonfly-2/HRT Microstreamer/FiiO E17k/FiiO E07k DAC/amps.

Review notes: My first impressions of the sound of the Master & Dynamic MH30 headphone are based on direct comparisons to other headphones, particularly those that resemble its design (portables mostly), but also to a few premium headphones for reference. I'll describe how I relate to the MH30 (i.e., my personal tastes and how I use the headphone) only after covering all of the objective issues. Before I list any caveats for the MH30, I want to say up front that I really like it - my ideal in many ways has been the v-moda M100 (the "King of Headphones"), which is a strong Mil-Spec metal build of medium weight (for its size). The MH30 is heavy for its size, but no heavier than many full-size headphones, so the weight won't be an important factor for experienced users. The build quality is excellent - metal mostly, with some very soft and squishy earpads.

Caveat 1: The clamping force is substantial - OK for the experienced headphone user, but it might surprise users who are used to Bose's light weight and clamp, for example. Caveat 2: The range of headband adjustment is unusually small - a total of about 3/8 inch on each side, where my average-size head fits 1/8 inch from the largest size. There are a lot of users whose heads won't fit within that range, but again, it will go larger and smaller than my head, so who knows... Caveat 3: The headband has essentially no padding at the top, and since the weight is heavier than the average on-ear headphone, some users may have an issue with that. Caveat 4: The sound is somewhat muffled, due to a small (~4 db) emphasis around 220 hz plus some emphasis higher up below 1 khz, in combination with ~9 db recesses around 5 and 8 khz. It's the combination of emphases lower down and recesses higher up that cause the sound to be dark or muffled.

One of my specialties is equalization ('EQ'), and so correcting the imbalance in the MH30's sound was an easy task, and now I have a premium-build headphone that also sounds like its $330 price tag. Some users might suggest just skipping a headphone that doesn't sound perfect and moving on to something else, but the thing I see is that no headphone is perfect and EQ costs nothing, so why not work out an EQ fix and see what results? Besides, probably the better half of the MH30's cost is in the aesthetics, so nothing needs to be fixed there. When used as a portable headphone, ambient noise will mask fine details that would be heard at home in a very quiet room, and so the sound may be perfectly acceptable for portable use. If not, a modest treble tweak will make up the difference. I didn't try to equalize the MH30's low-to-mid bass range, and the music tracks listed below will have the details on what the low-bass limitations are.

The MH30's earcups rotate about 5 degrees forward and 90 degrees backward. The earcups also fold into the headband, to make the most compact package. I was able to fold up the MH30 and tuck it into a Beyerdynamic DTX501p zippered hard case, which measures 7 inches by 5.5 inches by 1.4 inches zipped up - amazing! The primary detachable cable plugs into either earcup, it's about 4 ft long, covered with a good fabric weave, has an Apple-style control box 10 inches down from the earcup, and a separate microphone box 4 inches down from the earcup. Both ends are 3.5 mm miniplugs with the extra ring for the smartphone controls. The second cable is similar, about 6 ft long, and has no controls. The peculiar thing about the second cable is having these Apple-style miniplugs on both ends. On the end that goes into the earcup, it makes sense in that the earcup has a matching jack, but I wouldn't expect all devices that one would use a generic cable with to be compatible with the Apple-style plug that has the extra ring.

The MH30 is a closed-back headphone, and while the moderate isolation will be effective in a lot of average-noise situations, it probably won't be enough for riding the tube or the bus if the user wants full musical detail. The leakage is very low, so listening in a public library or a very quiet office should be possible if the volume isn't overly loud. The MH30 is an ideal portable in that it can be pulled off the head when not in use, and worn around the neck with the earcups pulled all the way out. Since the MH30 carries so easily around my neck when I'm not listening, I don't use a carrycase unless I have to pack it away. The MH30 doesn't include a carrycase anyway, just a cloth bag.

In previous reviews I've included the following music examples with comments about how the headphones sound with each track. My suggestion is instead of reading each one as an absolute unto itself, you could compare my notes here to those other reviews and see how the MH30 compares with each individual track.

NOTE: As stated above, I found the MH30 sound to be too treble-shy for critical listening, and so my evaluations were done using EQ's such as Audioforge on iOS or one of the Foobar equalizers. I would prefer to comment on the following music tracks without any EQ, but the notes would be too cluttered with comments about the recessed treble. My treble and bass targets are based on a Sennheiser HD800 with approximately 3 db more bass and 3 db less treble, i.e. a warmer and softer sound. For readers who believe that EQ won't make this kind of headphone sound better, then just read the following and imagine that it's even better than what I describe here, with the EQ turned off.

Animotion - Obsession (1980's New Wave/Techno): The upper bass synth has excellent detail and tone, and both male and female vocals sound natural without favoring either. The MH30 plays this extremely well.

Bauhaus - Bela Lugosi's Dead (~1980): Strong midrange sound effects - this is a good worst-case test for resonant-type sounds in the most sensitive midrange area. Handled pretty well by the MH30.

Beethoven Symphony 9, Solti/CSO (1972): Excellent overall sound. Of special note here are the bass impacts beginning around 10:30 of the fourth movement. Those impacts are soft and well in the background, and you can barely feel the weight they carry with the MH30.

Black Sabbath - Iron Man (Classic Rock): Very good instrumental detail and the vocal sounds very natural. As with most classic rock tracks, there is very little or no deep bass. The MH30 plays this music very smoothly, and the lack of deep bass doesn't unbalance the treble.

Boz Scaggs - Lowdown (1976): Great sound quality - this is a good test for any nasality in the midrange. Handled very well by the MH30.

Cantus - Danny Boy (Traditional/Male Choral/Acapella): The MH30 plays the voices with enough low end warmth and weight to sound very natural, yet there is no added emphasis of the lower register of the male voices on this track.

Cath Carroll - Moves Like You (1980's New Wave/Techno): This track's percussion and voice are crisp and well-balanced, and there's a good sense of space or soundstage around the voices and instruments. The MH30 reproduces the space and detail very well.

Catherine Wheel - Black Metallic (~1991): Goth with industrial overtones - I like this since it's a great music composition and the sound effects are smoothly integrated into the mix. This may sound distorted or mushy with some headphones, but the MH30 renders the deliberate instrumental distortions clearly.

Chris Isaak - Wicked Game (Pop/Rock): The MH30 plays this high treble energy recording very smoothly - the voice and instruments are very detailed but not edgy - very musical in fact.

Chromatics - I'm On Fire (Synth-Pop, female lead): This track has a good amount of space around the voice and instruments, making for a very pleasant stereo image. The voice is excellent, and the tambourine sound is clearly identifiable.

David Hazeltine - Fur Elise (Jazz): A very high-quality recording from HDTracks. The MH30 reproduces the instruments smoothly with a spacious ambiance. The wire-brush-on-cymbal harmonics are very extended and detailed.

Grieg (Beecham-Royal Philharmonic) - Peer Gynt-Solveig's Lullaby (Classical): This very old (late 1950's) stereo recording must have been made on the most expensive gear in the world, since the overall sound quality and especially Ilse Hollweg's amazing voice are as close to "being there" as I've heard with some of the better classical recordings made since the year 2000. The MH30 plays this music perfectly.

Hans Zimmer - Dark Knight-Aggressive Expansion (Soundtrack): The percussion in this track hits really hard, and while the bass tones beginning around 0:45 should have the ultra-deep "shuddery" kind of sound that indicates a solid deep-bass response, the MH30's response is light here.

Heaven 17 - Let Me Go (1980's New Wave/Techno): The bass instrument (guitar?) has excellent detail, and the voices and ambiance have a "you are there" quality that's uncommon in early 1980's pop music. The MH30 plays this track perfectly.

Hugo Audiophile - 15-16 (Electronic): I'm not sure what the 15-16 stands for - perhaps track numbers from a CD album. The deep-bass tones that start around 33-34 seconds into the track reproduce very well with the MH30. This is a great recording for evaluating whether a headphone's bass will be sufficient for most environments, since for many headphones that have a weaker bass, the deep bass gets absorbed and mostly lost when the environment contains a lot of low-frequency energy.

Jimmy Smith - Basin Street Blues (early 60's): This track has several loud crescendos of brass and other instruments that don't sound clean and musical with some headphones. The MH30 provides excellent reproduction. Listen particularly to the second crescendo at 15 seconds in for best-case detail. I'd like to emphasize that these crescendos are probably the worst-case test I have for instrument separation and detail, and the MH30 does those very well.

Kellogg Auditorium, Battle Creek Michigan, Aeolian-Skinner Organ (1933) - Pedal, 32', Resultant, Arpeggio: This 16 hz organ pedal tone differs from other music tones in that you won't "hear" the tone - you'll only feel it. Although most music tones have harmonics (including this one), the harmonics from this tone will be too weak to provide any "feel", so whatever you actually hear would not be part of the fundamental 16 hz tone. There are ~30 hz sounds in the outdoor environment in big cities, generated by large trucks, buses, and subway trains, and they have a quality of "rumble" that's similar to some deep-bass tones found in music. This 16 hz organ tone is easily distinguished from those sounds when compared on a headphone that has good undistorted response at 16 hz. The MH30 plays the fundamental tone with a very light weight, and whereas most similar headphones sound pretty detailed with that light weight, the MH30 does not.

Mantovani - Sunrise Sunset (Easy Listening, ca. 1972): A master musician and conductor** who specialized in light classics and orchestral pop music, Mantovani's accomplishments were overshadowed by music critics who couldn't tolerate the notion of "light classics" or "semi-classical" music, even when those recordings were no threat to the classical music genres. In any case the later Mantovani recordings from the mid-1960's through mid-1970's had the advantage of being mixed for much better hi-fi systems than those which the music critics possessed at the start of the Long Playing (LP) record cycle. Here in 2015, at least some of those digital remasters have improved the sound further, although it's not always the case. This track as played on the MH30 is a perfect example of the sheer musicality lurking in those later recordings, and is highly recommended for soundstage, instrumental tone, and musical balance.

**Mantovani developed the "Cascading Strings" sonic effect circa 1950, a famous "Wall of Sound" effect for mono hi-fi systems that predated Phil Spector's own famous Wall of Sound effect by 10 years or so.

Michael Tilson Thomas - Rhapsody In Blue (20th Century Classic): Great sound and soundstage, and terrific piano playing and tone. There are some very deep bass impacts starting around 38 seconds into the 17:24 length track, and the weight of those impacts is very light with the MH30.

Pinback - Non Photo Blue (Pop-Rock): Crispy sound with "crunchy guitars and bashing drums" - the MH30 renders this music as perfectly as I've heard an energetic pop-rock recording played with any headphone.

Porcupine Tree - Trains (Pop-Rock): This track opens with some nicely-detailed string sounds and a forward-sounding male voice with a higher-than-average register. There are a series of "clip-clop" effects starting at 3:19 that should sound like they were made with wooden blocks of some kind. The MH30 reproduction of the 'clop' effect isn't quite accurate.

Richard Strauss (Mester-Pasadena) - Also Sprach Zarathustra (opening) (Classical): The granddaddy of bass is in the opening 1:50 of this recording, and I've heard it only once on a large and expensive loudspeaker system in Cleveland. For most people, that experience would be indistinguishable from being in a fairly strong earthquake. The MH30 conveys some of that experience, but the deep bass (~32.7 hz) is pretty light. The tympani have fairly good impact here.

Scarlatti-Kipnis - Sonata in E Major K381 (Classical, Harpsichord): The harpsichord here is fairly bright and highly detailed, and the MH30 renders the tones and transients perfectly.

Tiger Okoshi - Bootsman's Little House (Jazz): The trumpet here is recorded fairly close up and is somewhat bright with a significant "bite". The MH30s reproduction is near-perfect, and the close-miked piano is also a treat. For comparison, I have several Maynard Ferguson tracks that feature a similarly strong trumpet with lots of brassy bite.

Trombone Shorty - Backatown (Jazz-Funk): The deep bass impacts here are strong, and work very well with the horns and other instruments. The MH30 delivers the impacts with good weight and detail, and the horns have the kind of bite that gives them a wonderfully realistic sound.
Comment Comments (6) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 29, 2016 5:53 PM PDT


FiiO EM3 Open Earbud Earphones with In-Line Microphone (Black)
FiiO EM3 Open Earbud Earphones with In-Line Microphone (Black)
Offered by All About Office
Price: $9.99
9 used & new from $8.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars FiiO EM3 Earbuds (not IEM) Stereo Earphone review by Dale, March 27, 2016
Sources: iPhone6s+ with Oppo HA-2/FiiO K1 DAC/amps, various computers using the Audioquest Dragonfly-2/HRT Microstreamer/FiiO E17k/FiiO E07k DAC/amps.

Review notes: My first impressions of the sound of the FiiO EM3 are based on direct comparisons to other earbud earphones, particularly the erstwhile audiophile types, but also to a few premium headphones for reference. I'll describe how I relate to the EM3 (i.e., my personal tastes and how I use the earphone) only after covering all of the objective issues. Note that since the EM3 is very bass-light, used without earpads**, my analysis of the sound will utilize equalization via the iOS Audioforge app and the Windows Foobar2000 digital music player.

**The tiny thin foam 'earpads' supplied with the EM3 earbuds have not proven useful to me, since in trying to mount them they've torn apart. Based on my last experience with such 'earpads', they do almost nothing to improve the sound. Still, the EM3 sounds fantastic with the EQ I've applied, so I highly recommend it for users who are willing to do likewise, or experiment for themselves.

The EM3, even when equalized, has a light mid-bass and essentially no usable low-bass. The EM3 would not be my first choice for EDM or pipe organ** music, but the overall sound is very smooth with surprisingly good voice and instrument tonalities. I've said this before in other reviews, but it applies to the EM3 as well: If I had only one earphone to use for the next year and the EM3 was that earphone, I'd find it enjoyable (with EQ) for 90 or more percent of listening I do - mostly pop, jazz, classical, rock, and new-wave. The EQ'd bass sounds very decent on most of my tracks, the mids and treble are well-balanced, but what sets the EM3 apart from most other earbud earphones is its more-or-less hi-fi response, as compared to the usual shrill or spoken-voice-oriented earbuds.

**The last half of the 20th century saw a move toward the construction and/or restoration of tracker organs, i.e. the mechanical-action organs similar to what Bach and others used. In my experience, tracker organ recordings don't typically exhibit much power in the deep bass below 40 hz, and they can sound pretty good on earbuds like the EM3.

Compared to a full-size headphone, the EM3 is going to sound thin, but whereas earbuds like those that come with iPods sound thin and squawky, the EM3 has a smoother, almost hi-fi sound. So I decided to compare the EM3 to another good-quality low-cost earbud - the Edifier P180, using no EQ or tone controls. The P180 has a strong midrange coloration that turns 'ahhhh' into 'ehhhh'. The EM3 has little or no such midrange coloration. The P180 has a decent warm low end, but the EM3 is less warm - in fact, any hi-fi afictionados who use the EM3 would want to boost the bass some, where users of the P180 will have greater difficulty trying to address its midrange coloration. The final issue is whether the sound is smooth, whether the tonality is accurate, and whether an audiophile volume level with strong dynamics causes any distortions. The EM3 sounds natural enough, takes a fair amount of bass and/or treble boost, and still plays loudly with no discernible strain or distortion.

In my opinion, based on the EQ curve I developed for the EM3 (seen on my website under photos and Audioforge pages 1 to 7), the potential sound of the EM3 is full-up hi-fi except for the deeper bass tones. This is a good result for any small low-cost headphone, but especially pertinent given that the EM3 is a tiny earbud. Isolation is nearly zero, so important musical details will be obscured in noisy environments. Leakage is low, but there's enough that if a user is playing music at audiophile volume levels in a library etc., people in the very near vicinity might hear faint sounds from the earphone. Finally, while I love the sound of the EM3, my estimation of its signature is based on the notions that my outer ears won't influence the sound much differently from other users, and that other users won't use the tiny thin 'earpads' or something similar that could have a significant effect on the sound.

The cables going from the 'Y' to the earpieces are very thin, so great care must be taken to ensure that the cords aren't yanked or otherwise subjected to abuse. The total length of the cable from the standard 3.5 mm terminator to the earpieces is about 4 ft. There is a control box on the cable for use with smartphones etc., however there are no volume up-down buttons. The EM3 that I have did not come with any kind of carry case, but it was packed with some tiny thin foam 'earpads'. There's a small fold-out booklet included, but it doesn't contain any actual instructions. I carry my EM3 earbuds in a small flat leatherette case made for generic IEM's.

This paragraph is the end of the review for most readers. The remainder below are my test tracks used for evaluating high fidelity headphones, and so for users who are interested in the maximum potential they can get from the EM3 earbuds, the comments below describe the sound that I get with the EM3 using a parametric equalizer - the Audioforge iOS app. Note that the equalizer doesn't just correct for peaks and recesses in the frequency response, the soundstage becomes much better and more natural with a proper EQ. In previous reviews I've included these music examples with comments about how the earphones sound with each track. My suggestion is instead of reading each one as an absolute unto itself, you could compare my notes here to those other reviews and see how the EM3 compares with each individual track.

Animotion - Obsession (1980's New Wave/Techno): The upper bass synth has excellent detail and tone, and both male and female vocals sound natural without favoring either. The EM3 plays this extremely well.

Bauhaus - Bela Lugosi's Dead (~1980): Strong midrange sound effects - this is a good worst-case test for resonant-type sounds in the most sensitive midrange area. Handled perfectly by the EM3.

Beethoven Symphony 9, Solti/CSO (1972): Excellent overall sound. Of special note here are the bass impacts beginning around 10:30 of the fourth movement. Those impacts are soft and well in the background, and you can almost feel the weight they carry with the EM3.

Black Sabbath - Iron Man (Classic Rock): Very good instrumental detail and the vocal sounds very natural. As with most classic rock tracks, there is very little or no deep bass. The EM3 plays this music very smoothly, and the lack of deep bass doesn't unbalance the treble.

Boz Scaggs - Lowdown (1976): Great sound quality - this is a good test for any nasality in the midrange. Handled very well by the EM3.

Cantus - Danny Boy (Traditional/Male Choral/Acapella): The EM3 plays the voices with a modest low end warmth that supports the lower register of the male voices on this track.

Cath Carroll - Moves Like You (1980's New Wave/Techno): This track's percussion and voice are crisp and well-balanced, and there's a good sense of space or soundstage around the voices and instruments. The EM3 reproduces the space and detail very well.

Catherine Wheel - Black Metallic (~1991): Goth with industrial overtones - I like this since it's a great music composition and the sound effects are smoothly integrated into the mix. This may sound distorted or mushy with some headphones, but the EM3 renders the deliberate instrumental distortions clearly.

Chris Isaak - Wicked Game (Pop/Rock): The EM3 plays this high treble energy recording very smoothly - the voice and instruments are very detailed but not edgy - very musical in fact.

Chromatics - I'm On Fire (Synth-Pop, female lead): This track has a good amount of space around the voice and instruments, making for a very pleasant stereo image. The voice is excellent, and the tambourine sound is clearly identifiable.

David Hazeltine - Fur Elise (Jazz): A very high-quality recording from HDTracks. The EM3 reproduces the instruments smoothly with a spacious ambiance. The wire-brush-on-cymbal harmonics are very extended and detailed.

Grieg (Beecham-Royal Philharmonic) - Peer Gynt-Solveig's Lullaby (Classical): This very old (late 1950's) stereo recording must have been made on the most expensive gear in the world, since the overall sound quality and especially Ilse Hollweg's amazing voice are as close to "being there" as I've heard with some of the better classical recordings made since the year 2000. The EM3 plays this music perfectly.

Hans Zimmer - Dark Knight-Aggressive Expansion (Soundtrack): The percussion in this track hits really hard, and while the bass tones beginning around 0:45 should have the ultra-deep "shuddery" kind of sound that indicates a solid deep-bass response, the EM3 bass is very light. Still, the EM3 plays this music very well.

Heaven 17 - Let Me Go (1980's New Wave/Techno): The bass instrument (guitar?) has excellent detail, and the voices and ambiance have a "you are there" quality that's uncommon in early 1980's pop music. The EM3 plays this track near-perfectly.

Hugo Audiophile - 15-16 (Electronic): I'm not sure what the 15-16 stands for - perhaps track numbers from a CD album. The deep-bass tones that start around 33-34 seconds into the track aren't full-strength, but do have a satisfying weight with the EM3. This is a great recording for evaluating whether a headphone's bass will be sufficient for most environments, since for many headphones that have a weaker bass, the deep bass gets absorbed and mostly lost when the environment contains a lot of low-frequency energy.

Jimmy Smith - Basin Street Blues (early 60's): This track has several loud crescendos of brass and other instruments that don't sound clean and musical with some headphones. The EM3 provides excellent reproduction when EQ'd. Listen particularly to the second crescendo at 15 seconds in for best-case detail. I'd like to emphasize that these crescendos are probably the worst-case test I have for instrument separation and detail, and the EM3 does those very well.

Kellogg Auditorium, Battle Creek Michigan, Aeolian-Skinner Organ (1933) - Pedal, 32', Resultant, Arpeggio: This 16 hz organ pedal tone differs from other music tones in that you won't "hear" the tone - you'll only feel it. Although most music tones have harmonics (including this one), the harmonics from this tone will be too weak to provide any "feel", so whatever you actually hear would not be part of the fundamental 16 hz tone. There are ~30 hz sounds in the outdoor environment in big cities, generated by large trucks, buses, and subway trains, and they have a quality of "rumble" that's similar to some deep-bass tones found in music. This 16 hz organ tone is easily distinguished from those sounds when compared on a headphone that has good undistorted response at 16 hz. The EM3's response at 16 hz is nearly nonexistent, yet you can clearly hear the 16-cycle per second 'beats' of that tone, which is very rewarding.

Mantovani - Sunrise Sunset (Easy Listening, ca. 1972): A master musician and conductor** who specialized in light classics and orchestral pop music, Mantovani's accomplishments were overshadowed by music critics who couldn't tolerate the notion of "light classics" or "semi-classical" music, even when those recordings were no threat to the classical music genres. In any case the later Mantovani recordings from the mid-1960's through mid-1970's had the advantage of being mixed for much better hi-fi systems than those which the music critics possessed at the start of the Long Playing (LP) record cycle. Here in 2015, at least some of those digital remasters have improved the sound further, although it's not always the case. This track as played on the EM3 is a perfect example of the sheer musicality lurking in those later recordings, and is highly recommended for soundstage, instrumental tone, and musical balance.

**Mantovani developed the "Cascading Strings" sonic effect circa 1950, a famous "Wall of Sound" effect for mono hi-fi systems that predated Phil Spector's own famous Wall of Sound effect by 10 years or so.

Michael Tilson Thomas - Rhapsody In Blue (20th Century Classic): Great sound and soundstage, and terrific piano playing and tone. There are some very deep bass impacts starting around 38 seconds into the 17:24 length track, and the weight of those impacts is extremely light with the EM3.

Pinback - Non Photo Blue (Pop-Rock): Crispy sound with "crunchy guitars and bashing drums" - the EM3 renders this music as perfectly as I've heard an energetic pop-rock recording played with any headphone.

Porcupine Tree - Trains (Pop-Rock): This track opens with some nicely-detailed string sounds and a forward-sounding male voice with a higher-than-average register. There are a series of "clip-clop" effects starting at 3:19 that should sound like they were made with wooden blocks of some kind. The EM3 reproduces the 'clop' portion of that sound fairly well.

Richard Strauss (Mester-Pasadena) - Also Sprach Zarathustra (opening) (Classical): The granddaddy of bass is in the opening 1:50 of this recording, and I've heard it only once on a large and expensive loudspeaker system in Cleveland. For most people, that experience would be indistinguishable from being in a fairly strong earthquake. The EM3 conveys some of that drama with a significant bass boost.

Scarlatti-Kipnis - Sonata in E Major K381 (Classical, Harpsichord): The harpsichord here is fairly bright and highly detailed, and the EM3 renders the tones and transients very well.

Tiger Okoshi - Bootsman's Little House (Jazz): The trumpet here is recorded fairly close up and is somewhat bright with a significant "bite". The EM3's reproduction is near-perfect, and the close-miked piano is also a treat. For comparison, I have several Maynard Ferguson tracks that feature a similarly strong trumpet with lots of brassy bite.

Trombone Shorty - Backatown (Jazz-Funk): The deep bass impacts here are less than full-up, but still satisfying to a good degree. The overall bass works well with the horns and other instruments, the EM3 delivers that bass with good detail, and the horns have the kind of bite that gives them a wonderfully realistic sound.
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1MORE MK801-RD Over Ear Headphones
1MORE MK801-RD Over Ear Headphones
Price: $79.99
3 used & new from $79.99

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 1More 'Over Ear' (MK801) Portable Stereo Headphone review by Dale, February 26, 2016
Sources: iPhone6s+ with Oppo HA-2/FiiO K1 DAC/amps, various computers using the Audioquest Dragonfly-2/HRT Microstreamer/FiiO E17k/FiiO E07k DAC/amps.

Review notes: My first impressions of the sound of the 1More 'Over-Ear' MK801 headphone ('MK801' hereafter) are based on direct comparisons to other headphones, particularly those that resemble its design (portables mostly), but also to a few premium headphones for reference. I'll describe how I relate to the MK801 (i.e., my personal tastes and how I use the headphone) only after covering all of the objective issues.

Nearly every new headphone I get** has been a surprise in one way or another, and the MK801 is no different. I'll get right to the point, i.e. the sound. The MK801's bass is nearly identical to v-moda's legendary M100. I've seen ads for the MK801 that describe a 'Super Bass', and it is that. Audiophiles want to know what that bass is made of of course - is it clean, tight, etc.? So since the bass is fairly strong, like the M100, to understand its quality better I perform some experiments: Start reducing from the upper bass with a parametric equalizer, and see if it thins out, or if the fundamental weight of the deep notes are still there. And the answer is yes - weighty, firm, tight - all that stuff. So while the 'Super' attribute probably refers to the amount of bass, the quality is as good as I've heard. And I've had a few headphones upward of $600 whose bass isn't so good. But this is a $99 headphone, so what am I giving up compared to the M100 for example?

**As an independent reviewer, 90 percent of the headphones I get are purchased, and all of those in the mid-to-upper price ranges are purchased out of pocket. But being an audiophile who serves users on tight budgets, I try to review as many budget headphones as possible.

The MK801's bass, out of the box and after burn-in, is as described above. The mids and treble can sound very slightly recessed, depending on how the subject music works with the strong bass. Ditto for the 'presence' region between approximately 3 to 6 khz. The very small peak around 9 khz balances out the treble. Now comes the big surprise. Comparing the MK801 to the king of strong bass headphones, playing both of them flat (no tone controls or EQ), the only significant difference is that the MK801 has a more neutral or natural midrange. I'll end that comparison and description of the sound right there. Let someone else do the more detailed analysis, but hey - this is a good result for $250, let alone $99. And the build quality is very good - mostly metal, with nice soft earpads and good padding under the headband. Isolation is moderate, but useful. Not ideal for commutes or jet planes, but good otherwise. Leakage is low, but if played loudly in a quiet office, someone close by could hear a faint sound.

The MK801 earpads are a snug fit around my average-size ears. For users with big ears, these will probably work as on-ear, but they should be very comfortable anyway. The earcups have a few degrees of rotation horizontally and vertically, so they should accomodate most headphone users' heads. The headband's total range of adjustment is about 9/8 inch on each side, where my average-size head fits the middle of that range, so that should also accomodate nearly everyone.

The cable is single-entry, about 4.5 ft. long, and terminated with an Apple-style 3.5 mm miniplug. The 3-button control box on the cable does start/stop, next/previous, and volume up/down on Apple devices. The start/stop and next/previous button should work with Android phones, but I don't know whether the volume buttons will work on non-Apple devices. The MK801 is an ideal portable headphone in that it can be pulled off the head when not in use, and worn around the neck with the earcups pulled all the way down. A heavy cloth bag with drawstrings is supplied, but since the MK801 carries so easily around my neck when I'm not listening, I don't use the carry-bag unless I have to pack it away. There's a lot of competition in low-cost headphones these days, especially among the no-name or OEM brands, but 1More makes high-quality headphones, and I've used several of them. I highly recommend the MK801, for sound quality, build quality, and flexibility.

In previous reviews I've included the following music examples with comments about how the headphones sound with each track. My suggestion is instead of reading each one as an absolute unto itself, you could compare my notes here to those other reviews and see how the MK801 compares with each individual track.

Animotion - Obsession (1980's New Wave/Techno): The upper bass synth has excellent detail and tone, and both male and female vocals sound natural without favoring either. The MK801 plays this extremely well.

Bauhaus - Bela Lugosi's Dead (~1980): Strong midrange sound effects - this is a good worst-case test for resonant-type sounds in the most sensitive midrange area. Handled perfectly by the MK801.

Beethoven Symphony 9, Solti/CSO (1972): Excellent overall sound. Of special note here are the bass impacts beginning around 10:30 of the fourth movement. Those impacts are soft and well in the background, but you can really feel the weight they carry with the MK801.

Black Sabbath - Iron Man (Classic Rock): Very good instrumental detail and the vocal sounds very natural. As with most classic rock tracks, there is very little or no deep bass. The MK801 plays this music very smoothly, and the lack of deep bass doesn't unbalance the treble.

Boz Scaggs - Lowdown (1976): Great sound quality - this is a good test for any nasality in the midrange. Handled very well by the MK801.

Cantus - Danny Boy (Traditional/Male Choral/Acapella): The MK801 plays the voices with enough low end warmth and weight to sound very natural, yet there is no added emphasis of the lower register of the male voices on this track.

Cath Carroll - Moves Like You (1980's New Wave/Techno): This track's percussion and voice are crisp and well-balanced, and there's a good sense of space or soundstage around the voices and instruments. The MK801 reproduces the space and detail very well.

Catherine Wheel - Black Metallic (~1991): Goth with industrial overtones - I like this since it's a great music composition and the sound effects are smoothly integrated into the mix. This may sound distorted or mushy with some headphones, but the MK801 renders the deliberate instrumental distortions clearly.

Chris Isaak - Wicked Game (Pop/Rock): The MK801 plays this high treble energy recording very smoothly - the voice and instruments are very detailed but not edgy - very musical in fact.

Chromatics - I'm On Fire (Synth-Pop, female lead): This track has a good amount of space around the voice and instruments, making for a very pleasant stereo image. The voice is excellent, and the tambourine sound is clearly identifiable.

David Hazeltine - Fur Elise (Jazz): A very high-quality recording from HDTracks. The MK801 reproduces the instruments smoothly with a spacious ambiance. The wire-brush-on-cymbal harmonics are very extended and detailed.

Grieg (Beecham-Royal Philharmonic) - Peer Gynt-Solveig's Lullaby (Classical): This very old (late 1950's) stereo recording must have been made on the most expensive gear in the world, since the overall sound quality and especially Ilse Hollweg's amazing voice are as close to "being there" as I've heard with some of the better classical recordings made since the year 2000. The MK801 plays this music perfectly.

Hans Zimmer - Dark Knight-Aggressive Expansion (Soundtrack): The percussion in this track hits really hard, and the bass tones beginning around 0:45 have the ultra-deep "shuddery" kind of sound that indicates a solid deep-bass response. Overall, the MK801 plays this music extremely well.

Heaven 17 - Let Me Go (1980's New Wave/Techno): The bass instrument (guitar?) has excellent detail, and the voices and ambiance have a "you are there" quality that's uncommon in early 1980's pop music. The MK801 plays this track perfectly.

Hugo Audiophile - 15-16 (Electronic): I'm not sure what the 15-16 stands for - perhaps track numbers from a CD album. The deep-bass tones that start around 33-34 seconds into the track reproduce very well with the MK801. This is a great recording for evaluating whether a headphone's bass will be sufficient for most environments, since for many headphones that have a weaker bass, the deep bass gets absorbed and mostly lost when the environment contains a lot of low-frequency energy.

Jimmy Smith - Basin Street Blues (early 60's): This track has several loud crescendos of brass and other instruments that don't sound clean and musical with some headphones. The MK801 provides excellent reproduction. Listen particularly to the second crescendo at 15 seconds in for best-case detail. I'd like to emphasize that these crescendos are probably the worst-case test I have for instrument separation and detail, and the MK801 does those very well.

Kellogg Auditorium, Battle Creek Michigan, Aeolian-Skinner Organ (1933) - Pedal, 32', Resultant, Arpeggio: This 16 hz organ pedal tone differs from other music tones in that you won't "hear" the tone - you'll only feel it. Although most music tones have harmonics (including this one), the harmonics from this tone will be too weak to provide any "feel", so whatever you actually hear would not be part of the fundamental 16 hz tone. There are ~30 hz sounds in the outdoor environment in big cities, generated by large trucks, buses, and subway trains, and they have a quality of "rumble" that's similar to some deep-bass tones found in music. This 16 hz organ tone is easily distinguished from those sounds when compared on a headphone that has good undistorted response at 16 hz. The MK801 plays the fundamental tone with excellent weight, and enough detail that you can almost count the 16 cycle-per-second beats of that tone.

Mantovani - Sunrise Sunset (Easy Listening, ca. 1972): A master musician and conductor** who specialized in light classics and orchestral pop music, Mantovani's accomplishments were overshadowed by music critics who couldn't tolerate the notion of "light classics" or "semi-classical" music, even when those recordings were no threat to the classical music genres. In any case the later Mantovani recordings from the mid-1960's through mid-1970's had the advantage of being mixed for much better hi-fi systems than those which the music critics possessed at the start of the Long Playing (LP) record cycle. Here in 2015, at least some of those digital remasters have improved the sound further, although it's not always the case. This track as played on the MK801 is a perfect example of the sheer musicality lurking in those later recordings, and is highly recommended for soundstage, instrumental tone, and musical balance.

**Mantovani developed the "Cascading Strings" sonic effect circa 1950, a famous "Wall of Sound" effect for mono hi-fi systems that predated Phil Spector's own famous Wall of Sound effect by 10 years or so.

Michael Tilson Thomas - Rhapsody In Blue (20th Century Classic): Great sound and soundstage, and terrific piano playing and tone. There are some very deep bass impacts starting around 38 seconds into the 17:24 length track, and the weight of those impacts is appreciable with the MK801.

Pinback - Non Photo Blue (Pop-Rock): Crispy sound with "crunchy guitars and bashing drums" - the MK801 renders this music as perfectly as I've heard an energetic pop-rock recording played with any headphone.

Porcupine Tree - Trains (Pop-Rock): This track opens with some nicely-detailed string sounds and a forward-sounding male voice with a higher-than-average register. There are a series of "clip-clop" effects starting at 3:19 that should sound like they were made with wooden blocks of some kind. The MK801 reproduces the 'clop' portion of that sound almost perfectly.

Richard Strauss (Mester-Pasadena) - Also Sprach Zarathustra (opening) (Classical): The granddaddy of bass is in the opening 1:50 of this recording, and I've heard it only once on a large and expensive loudspeaker system in Cleveland. For most people, that experience would be indistinguishable from being in a fairly strong earthquake. The MK801 conveys as much of that experience as I've heard with a stereo headphone. The tympani also have good impact here.

Scarlatti-Kipnis - Sonata in E Major K381 (Classical, Harpsichord): The harpsichord here is fairly bright and highly detailed, and the MK801 renders the tones and transients perfectly.

Tiger Okoshi - Bootsman's Little House (Jazz): The trumpet here is recorded fairly close up and is somewhat bright with a significant "bite". The MK801's reproduction is near-perfect, and the close-miked piano is also a treat. For comparison, I have several Maynard Ferguson tracks that feature a similarly strong trumpet with lots of brassy bite.

Trombone Shorty - Backatown (Jazz-Funk): The deep bass impacts here are strong, and work extremely well with the horns and other instruments. The MK801 delivers the impacts with great weight and detail, and the horns have the kind of bite that gives them a wonderfully realistic sound.
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Conspiracy Theories and Other Dangerous Ideas
Conspiracy Theories and Other Dangerous Ideas
by Cass R. Sunstein
Edition: Hardcover
43 used & new from $2.94

3 of 10 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Cass Sunstein - the real Tin-Foil Hat man., February 1, 2016
Edit: "Zero of 3 found this review helpful" - indeed, the truth hurts!

Sunstein is transparent - easy to see through. He fears truth, because truth could upset the public, and the public might stop paying taxes, or boycott them for awhile. I know plenty of conspiracy theorists - all of them completely harmless. BTW, that guy with the shaved head who carries the rebel flag and shouts white power - he doesn't rely on conspiracy theories to be dangerous - his deal is real, and based on real events. The more government grows (and it is growing), the more dangerous it is to liberty. That's a transparent truth. Just look at MAD for example - is there anything that ever existed in Sunstein's little mind that compares to having 40 thousand thermonuclear bombs pointed at your head, just because your "leaders" refuse to get along with the Soviet Union of 300 million people? We get along with them now. That's proof enough of extreme government paranoia, and Sunstein is their advanced practitioner.


Evil Town
Evil Town
Price: $2.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Evil Town by John David Bethel (more real than any fiction) review by Dale, December 23, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Evil Town (Kindle Edition)
02/27/2016: Update (still reading). You'd expect murder as a desperate act to stop an investigation that could lose certain people millions of dollars, but you probably don't expect murder of Congress members' next of kin as a strategy to keep them in Washington, in case they might get to cast a favorable vote on an important business development in their district. You dread these things, but you have the uneasy feeling that they actually take place. Read and imagine...

12/30/2015: Update at the half-way point. As one who has worked with people in Washington and on the fringes (mostly the fringes), I have a sense of how a lot of things work, for example through business fronts. The opportunities for ambitious young people to work their way up in government or with government associates are mind-boggling, and this book serves up some intriguing example scenarios. Read this and be informed...

12/23/2015: Awesome, simply awesome. I'm only a third of the way through, but even if I hated the remaining 2/3 of it, the 15 stars I have accorded this book so far would still net out to 5 stars. This book doesn't use 'real' names of the current players, but it's chillingly believable in how it portrays bribes, kickbacks, threats, coverups, and ummm .... that other stuff. "So, Bob, we could really use you in that Senate seat now, with the upcoming contracts from Luckup Industries. We really don't want to lose that money. Really." And you can feel the tone of that exchange (not a quote BTW), and what might be the consequences of ignoring it.


V-MODA Zn In-Ear Modern Audiophile Headphones with microphone - 3 Button
V-MODA Zn In-Ear Modern Audiophile Headphones with microphone - 3 Button
Price: $179.99
19 used & new from $98.95

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars V-MODA Zn In-Ear Earphone/IEM review by Dale, November 26, 2015
Sources: iPhone6s+ with Oppo HA-2/Beyer A200p DAC/amps, various computers using the Audioquest Dragonfly-2/HRT Microstreamer/FiiO E17k/FiiO E07k DAC/amps.

Going right to the sound, the Zn has a strong bass, an unremarkable (smooth, clean, uncolored) midrange, and a treble with plenty of energy and detail. Many earphone/IEMs have a rolloff in the lower bass following an upper-bass emphasis of some kind, but the Zn goes deep - really deep, as witnessed by tracks like Markus Schulz's Mainstage. Some earphone/IEMs won't even play that without breaking up, but the Zn delivers. I have a number of sample tracks listed below with my impressions of how the Zn plays that music - suffice it to say that it does the magic. People who are familiar with the V-MODA M100 or Wireless will recognize much of that sound in the Zn, but I'd say the Zn has a little more 'presence' in the upper mids to lower treble, more like the Wireless than the M100. Caveat: The final analysis in bass-mids-treble balance depends greatly on the seal you get with the Zn's eartips, so users should be willing to experiment with those to get the best balance they can.

My overall impressions of the sound are: A nice warmth with a solid foundation of bass at the bottom, very musical and detailed mids, and a full smooth treble. I expect a lot of critics to say the sound is 'V'-shaped, and since the 'V' motif is right at home here, there you go! Many pricy headphones, particularly the classic 'neutral' models by Sennheiser, Beyerdynamic, AKG etc. have a strong treble and a less-than-strong bass response. Not the Zn - here we have a strong deep bass at one end, and a treble at the other end that complements the bass very well. In between are mids that are made for music - music of all kinds. The isolation seems average to me, and it will help in moderately noisy situations, but won't be a great noise stopper on jet planes or the tube. Leakage seems to be a non-issue. Soundstage is mostly dependent on the music, but it also varies according to the treble balance. My sense of the Zn is that the treble is right where it needs to be to have the best soundstage.

My sample of the Zn is mostly black with diamond-like accents on the earpieces. The cable has an alternating black/grey weave pattern with a 3-button control 6 inches from the right earpiece, containing a microphone. A small box sporting V-MODA motifs, black on one side and chromed on the other, separates the 'Y' from the rest of the cable, down to the Apple-style 45-degree angled miniplug. The 3-button controls work with Apple i-devices, but apparently only the start/stop works with non-Apple players. I believe there's another version on the way soon. A nice small leather carrycase with magnetic closure is included for when you don't want to hang the Zn around your neck etc. when not listening. There are 8 total sets of eartips included - 4 black pairs and 4 translucent pairs. The tips installed on my Zn were the next-to-largest pair, and they fit me perfectly. A pair of black soft-rubber earhooks were also included.

In previous reviews I've included music examples with comments about how the headphones sound with each track. My suggestion is instead of reading each one as an absolute unto itself, you could compare my notes here to other reviews containing those tracks and see how the Zn compares with each individual track. NOTE: I have no expertise in EDM music, so I don't speak EDM here - I'm just giving my impressions of the Zn's ability to reproduce the musical sounds in these amazing tracks. NOTE: Beware of fakes/clones (note the no-fugazi label) - this high-quality earphone/IEM will certainly show up at bargain prices on some sales sites, but the steep 'discount' is your clue that those are extremely unlikely to be the real deal.

Above & Beyond - We're All We Need (feat. Zoe Johnston): A nice tight but impactful bass with crystal clear vocals - the Zn plays this with great ambiance.

Anamanaguchi - Planet: A complex mix of percussion sounds and hummed vocals. The bells and other high-frequency percussion are highly detailed, and the bass line has good impact and detail. The Zn does this justice.

Armin van Buuren - J'ai Envie de Toi (Orig Mix feat Gaia): Decent bass impacts, breathy vocals, lots of fun noise - the Zn plays this perfectly.

Avicii - Feeling Good: Classic female vocal in movie-theme style - the Zn renders the singing in a very natural way.

Carl Kennedy-Tommy Trash ft Rosie Henshaw - Blackwater (Original Master): Nice strong bass impacts with female vocal, rendered delectably by the Zn.

Crystal Castles - Wrath of God: Atmospheric tune with vocal sound effects and strong bass line, plus some unique treble percussion sounds. The Zn brings these unique sounds to life.

Digitalism - Pogo: A driving beat with a detailed bass synth and great vocals ("There's something in the air...") - the Zn makes this very enjoyable.

Dino Lenny-Lino Di Meglio - We Will Make It: Atmospheric tune with mixed vocals - the female vocal is a special treat with the Zn.

DJ Shadow - Building Steam With A Grain Of Salt: High-pitched tones and strong deep piano chords with a hummed female vocal - ultra-cool with the Zn.

Fairmont - Poble Sec: Awesome bass impacts with nifty guitar/synth pinging effects. I discovered this tune at the time I purchased my 3rd V-MODA M100. The Zn covers this perfectly.

Giuseppe Ottaviani - Lost for Words (On Air Mix feat Amba Shepherd): Strong bass impacts behind a female voice - a large-scale sweeping sonic image reminiscent of epic adventures in an exotic land. The Zn is running on high octane here.

Hecq - Enceladus (With Skyence): Prodigious bass and clean at that. This tune's melody is more abstract than most of the others here, but the Zn makes it a pleasurable listen.

Katy B - Crying For No Reason (Tom Shorterz Remix): I love Katy B. The vocal mix here is awesome, the bass is solid - this is the Zn at its best.

Ladytron - Destroy Everything You Touch: I first heard this in The September Issue film and soundtrack, as the backdrop for the opening catwalk (watch Andre smile at 1:51 - all you need to know) - the Zn plays this amazing tune perfectly.

Lee and Malinda - Truth Will Set You Free (V-Moda Mix): Lee Kalt is the master, this is the masterpiece. The drum (or tom-tom) hits here have a very realistic skin-tone, the female vocal is seamlessly integrated into the driving beat, and the synth effects also blend well - the Zn just owns this.

Markus Schulz - Mainstage: The granddaddy of bass is in this track, and the Zn plays it smooth and clean.

Satchmode - Best Intentions: Nice breezy vocals, great melody, decent bass impacts, open airy soundstage - it doesn't get better than hearing it on the Zn.

Sneaker Pimps - Underground (Nellee Hooper Mix): Atmospheric tune with mixed vocals, good bass support, percussion, guitars etc. On some headphones the sound may get mushy, but it's nice and clear with the Zn.

Soliquid - Shibuya (Paul Keeley Remix): A good driving bass and percussion, layered over with a beautiful melody on the synth - the Zn does this proud.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Dec 31, 2015 3:54 AM PST


first harmonic IEB6+mic in-ear metal headphone with an engineered 5.5mm mini-driver for exceptional sound.
first harmonic IEB6+mic in-ear metal headphone with an engineered 5.5mm mini-driver for exceptional sound.
Offered by First Harmonic
Price: $34.99
8 used & new from $20.00

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars First Harmonic IEB6 Earphone/IEM Ear-Canal Headphone review by Dale, November 16, 2015
Sources: iPhone6s+ with Oppo HA2/Beyer A200p DAC/amps, various computers using the Audioquest Dragonfly-2/HRT Microstreamer/FiiO E17k/FiiO E07k DAC/amps.

Review notes: My first impressions of the sound of the First Harmonic IEB6+Mic are based on direct comparisons to other earphones such as the RHA MA750, RHA T20, B&O H3, various Soundmagic IEMs, and headphones such as the v-moda XS, AKG K553, Philips SHP9500, etc. Adding to that are the notes I've accumulated from other prior reviews. I'll describe how I relate to the IEB6 (i.e. my personal tastes and how I use this earphone) only after covering all of the objective issues. My experience with in-ear earphones (IEM's) is limited to about a dozen different types, and the sound of those varies widely depending on the eartips used and how well they seal for bass balance etc. in the ear canals. But, I have a good sense of when I'm getting the proper seal, by pushing the earpieces in until the treble drops noticeably, then backing off until it pops back in - crude but effective.

The IEB6 impresses me somewhat like the RHA models (MA350, MA750, T20) on the top end, since I find the RHA's to be rather bright, even with the best eartip fit I can get. That's also true of the B&O H3 I had, or even the outrageously expensive Final Audio FI-BA-SS. So my estimation of the IEB6 is it's a bit on the bright side for me, but of course that depends on the eartips you use and how well they seal in your ear canal. The seal has a major effect on the bass and low-end warmth, which in turn determines the overall balance. My IEB6 came with the smallest eartips installed, but I settled on the next-to-largest tips which give me a pretty good seal. The IEB6 earpieces are very small and you might not expect big sound, especially smooth sound from this IEM. However, the midrange is very smooth top to bottom, and the clarity is outstanding. Maximum clean volume is more than enough to overload any user's ears, so caution is advised - don't be fooled by the size.

The IEB6 bass is hard to describe, because it's close to an ideal 'neutral' curve - i.e. users who want a stronger bass will discover that most bass-boost controls make the IEB6 bass too strong. That's all good news. The bass detail is very good, but users who want strong impacts for gaming and so on might prefer something that's designed for those purposes. There are 20 music tracks listed below that give examples of how the IEB6 performs on different genres of music, but a couple more examples here won't hurt - Markus Schulz's Mainstage has an synth that goes extremely deep with immense power. The IEB6 plays it cleanly. Back down to Earth, the Modern Jazz Tuba Project performs jazz with tubas, and the IEB6 provides sufficient deep-bass detail to make the tubas sound realistic. But the creme de la creme is the 16 hz organ pedal from the Kellogg Auditorium sounds available online - you can feel the weight or the tones, and the detail is so good that you can hear the individual 'beats' of the 16 hz tone.

The IEB6 soundstage is quite good, but experienced IEM users know that a full treble is necessary for a realistic soundstage, so if you were looking for an IEM that's darker than neutral, it may be difficult or impossible to get a good soundstage from it. Isolation is excellent I think, but not near Bose-level noise canceling. Leakage is very low, but if you're going to use the IEB6 in a very quiet office or library, a person sitting right next to you might hear something faintly if your playback volume is high. Summarizing my impressions of the IEB6 - a slightly bright sound (with my eartip choice) with a very smooth and uncolored midrange, and a fairly neutral bass with the right qualities.

The IEB6 cable looks good and strong for an IEM. There's a control with a mic and one button (start/stop/next/previous) on the right side. The cable length is approximately 4 ft. including the 'Y' that goes to the earpieces. The terminator is a 45-degree angled miniplug. The cable is somewhat microphonic above the 'Y' where it splits and goes to each earpiece, so I recommend keeping the included clothing clip handy and using it to keep that part of the cable from rubbing against any clothing. There are 5 total pairs of eartips - one installed and 4 other pairs of different sizes. The fabric storage bag included with the earphone will protect it in pockets or bags, as long as a crushing weight or impact isn't applied to the earphones.

The comments in the music tracks listed below can be compared to other headphone reviews I've done, to get an idea of how the IEB6 plays the different music tracks listed here compared to other headphones. My suggestion is instead of reading each comment below as an absolute unto itself, you could compare these notes to other reviews as they get posted, and see how the IEB6 compares with each individual track.

Antonin Dvorak (Alsop-Baltimore Symphony): Just after 0:40 of Movement No.2 begins a counterpoint between two instruments - one followed by the other (woodwind and horn), but not necessarily in that order. The IEB6 resolves those clearly, and I leave it to the listener to discern which is which.

Ben Goldberg - Root and Branch (Jazz): The horns and clarinet have a rich tone, the bass provides excellent supporting weight, and the percussion is crisp and detailed. There's a lot going on in this track, and the IEB6 delineates it all perfectly.

Boz Scaggs - Lowdown (1976): Good sound quality - this is a great test for any nasality in the midrange. Handled extremely well by the IEB6.

Cath Carroll - Moves Like You (1980's New Wave/Techno): This track's percussion and voice are crisp and well-balanced, and there's a good sense of space or soundstage around the voices and instruments. The IEB6 reproduces the space and detail beautifully.

Chris Isaak - Wicked Game (Pop/Rock): The IEB6 plays this high treble energy recording very smoothly - the voice and instruments are very detailed but not edgy - very musical in fact.

Christophe Beck - Slayer's Elegy (Soundtrack): The voice, percussion, and other sonic effects occupy a huge soundstage, but it all sounds natural and coherent with the IEB6.

Chromatics - I'm On Fire (Synth-Pop, female lead): This track has a good amount of space around the voice and instruments, making for a very pleasant stereo image. The voice is excellent, and the tambourine has a natural sound.

Cranes - Adoration (Goth-Rock): This track begins with some realistic piano notes, and the percussion and voice improvisation are blended in to create a very atmospheric effect. The IEB6 plays this perfectly.

David Hazeltine - Fur Elise (Jazz): A very high-quality recording from HDTracks. The IEB6 reproduces the instruments smoothly with a spacious ambiance. The wire-brush-on-cymbal harmonics are very extended and detailed.

Ed Palermo - Crazy (Pop Vocal): A dose of big band, pop, country, and jazz with a unique vocal is Ed Palermo's Big Band, and this track is a great demo for the IEB6 - for instrumental tone and ambiance, and a perfectly-recorded vocal. The saxophone lead at 2:51 is especially gratifying.

Grieg (Beecham-Royal Philharmonic) - Peer Gynt-Solveig's Lullaby (Classical): This very old (late 1950's) stereo recording must have been made on the most expensive gear in the world, since the overall sound quality and especially Ilse Hollweg's amazing voice are as close to "being there" as I've heard with some of the better classical recordings made since the year 2000. The IEB6 plays this music perfectly.

Hubert Kah - The Picture (New Wave): The voice and electronic effects sound quite natural, and the bass synth is properly warm and very detailed. The IEB6 plays this lively music with great energy.

Mantovani - Sunrise Sunset (Easy Listening, ca. 1972): A master musician and conductor** who specialized in light classics and orchestral pop music, Mantovani's accomplishments were overshadowed by music critics who couldn't tolerate the notion of "light classics" or "semi-classical" music, even when those recordings were no threat to the classical music genres. In any case the later Mantovani recordings from the mid-1960's through mid-1970's had the advantage of being mixed for much better hi-fi systems than those which the music critics possessed at the start of the Long Playing (LP) record cycle. Here in 2015, at least some of those digital remasters have improved the sound further, although it's not always the case. This track as played on the IEB6 is a perfect example of the sheer musicality lurking in those later recordings, and is highly recommended for soundstage, instrumental tone, and musical balance.

**Mantovani developed the "Cascading Strings" sonic effect circa 1950, a famous "Wall of Sound" effect for mono hi-fi systems that predated Phil Spector's own famous Wall of Sound effect by 10 years or so.

Marc Johnson - Prayer Beads (Acoustic): The upright bass has excellent string tone and weight. The IEB6 plays this very well.

Michael Buble - Nice 'n Easy (Jazz): The voice is prominent but well-recorded, the massed instruments are delineated nicely, and the bass line especially is clear and detailed. This sounds pretty good with most headphones, and the IEB6 makes it very enjoyable.

Porcupine Tree - Trains (Pop-Rock): This track opens with some nicely-detailed string sounds and a forward-sounding male voice with a higher-than-average register. There are a series of "clip-clop" effects starting at 3:19 that should sound like they were made with wooden blocks of some kind. The IEB6 reproduces that sound with a lighter effect.

Scarlatti-Kipnis - Sonata in E Major K381 (Classical, Harpsichord): The harpsichord here is fairly bright and highly detailed, and the IEB6 renders the tones and transients perfectly.

Sophie Milman - Lonely in New York (Jazz): The instruments (trumpet, violin, percussion etc.) and the vocal are very strong, and the voice can be rather sibilant on many headphones - especially those with a strong treble. The IEB6 renders this track as musically as I've ever heard.

Tiger Okoshi - Bootsman's Little House (Jazz): The trumpet here is recorded fairly close up and is somewhat bright with a significant "bite". The IEB6's reproduction is near-perfect, and the close-miked piano is also a treat. For comparison, I have several Maynard Ferguson tracks that feature a similarly strong trumpet with lots of brassy bite.

Tutt-Keltner - Drum Improvisation (Jazz): The drums have great impact with realistic "skin" tone, the cymbal harmonics are very shimmery, and the transient sounds are cleanly reproduced. The IEB6 really brings this track to life.
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V-MODA Crossfade Wireless Over-Ear Headphone - Gunmetal Black
V-MODA Crossfade Wireless Over-Ear Headphone - Gunmetal Black
Price: $299.98
13 used & new from $216.24

8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars V-MODA Wireless Around-Ear Bluetooth Stereo Headphone review by Dale, November 15, 2015
Sources: iPhone6s+ with Oppo HA-2/Beyer A200p DAC/amps, various computers using the Audioquest Dragonfly-2/HRT Microstreamer/FiiO E17k/FiiO E07k DAC/amps.

Going right to the sound, the Wireless has a strong bass, an unremarkable (smooth, clean, uncolored) midrange, and a treble with plenty of energy and detail. Many headphones have an emphasized mid-upper bass that creates a sense of warmth and fullness on the majority of music tracks, but the Wireless goes deep - really deep, as witnessed by tracks like Markus Schulz's Mainstage. Some headphones won't even play that without breaking up, but the Wireless delivers. I have a number of sample tracks listed below with my impressions of how the Wireless plays that music - suffice it to say that it does the magic. People who are familiar with the V-MODA M100 will recognize much of that sound in the Wireless, and yet the Wireless is a little different from my M100, mainly in having a little more 'presence' in the upper mids to lower treble.

My overall impressions of the sound are: One, imagine a perfect balmy evening outdoors in Los Angeles. Such perfect balmy evenings are unusual, even in that area of Southern California. The warmth of the V-MODA Wireless is like that - perfect, with a solid foundation of bass at the bottom. I once described the M100 sound as like being wrapped up in a friendship - 3 in bed for example (I hope nobody is offended by that image). The Wireless is also like that. My second significant impression is regarding the treble - many pricy headphones, particularly some DJ models, roll off the treble since they expect that their headphone will be used in a very noisy environment with the volume turned up high, and a full treble would be too much at that volume. The Wireless has a full treble - not bright like a Sennheiser HD600 or AKG K701, but enough for hi-fi reproduction, so if you play it extremely loud, take that into consideration (and check the music track samples below).

To check out the wireless (Bluetooth) capability, I paired it with my iPhone 6S-plus, and placed the phone at one end of my apartment. I walked into several other rooms including laundry and bath rooms, closets, A/C enclosures etc., up to 35 feet from the phone, and the signal was always clean and perfect. I've used only a couple other wireless headphones, and neither were 100 percent in that regard. I also have a high-quality wireless receiver, and that tends to have a small "glitch" every half hour or so. The only problem I've had so far with this setup is when my phone was right next to a custom-made LED lamp - I haven't found that where I am with the headphone makes a difference, unless any difference (interference etc.) is caused by the phone itself. I don't hear a significant difference between the sound in passive and wireless modes, but if the very small difference is critical to anyone, there's no way for me to guess which way that would go.

Isolation is average for a closed headphone I think, so if I'm walking in a park close to a busy freeway, I need to stay about 100 yards distant from the traffic to have a good low-noise listening experience. There are a few headphones that aren't noise-canceling that still have higher isolation, but I've found those to be less than comfortable. Leakage is low enough that the Wireless can be used in a public library or quiet office if the playback volume isn't extreme. Headphone soundstage is mostly dependent on the music of course, but soundstage also varies according to the average level of the treble, or treble balance. My sense of the Wireless is that the treble is right where it needs to be to have the best soundstage for this type of closed headphone.

My sample of the Wireless is black with the standard plain shields in a gunmetal color or finish. I have V-MODA 3D shields with the 'spikes' motif on my M100, so I'll probably wind up with something different on the Wireless. For wired use, there are 2 cables (I got 2) included - one for Android apparently, and one for Apple devices. The left earcup has a jack for the included charging cord, USB-A to MicroUSB, and the right earcup has the minijack for the headphone cable. The other end of the cable is a 45-degree angled miniplug (3.5 mm). The headband has some spongy padding, and the around-ear (circumaural) earpads are very soft and squishy and covered in a high-quality pleather. V-MODA makes available larger (XL) earpads for people with large ears - my average-size ears are very comfy in the standard earpads. I rate the Wireless near the top of my list of comfortable headphones, and I've had no need to bend the headband for a better fit.

The Wireless has controls on top of the right earcup for start/stop and volume up/down, and the wireless/pairing on/off switch on the bottom. A zippered hard-shell carrycase is included for portability when you don't want to wear it around your neck. I don't use the case unless I'm traveling, because it's much more convenient to carry it around my neck when not listening. The headband's range of adjustment is about 1/2 inch larger and 1/2 inch smaller on each side compared to where I use it on my average-size head. In previous reviews I've included music examples with comments about how the headphones sound with each track. My suggestion is instead of reading each one as an absolute unto itself, you could compare my notes here to other reviews containing those tracks and see how the Wireless compares with each individual track. NOTE: I have no expertise in EDM music, so I don't speak EDM here - I'm just giving my impressions of the Wireless' ability to reproduce the musical sounds in these amazing tracks.

Note that the Wireless was evaluated above and below without tone controls or equalization.

Above & Beyond - We're All We Need (feat. Zoe Johnston): A very nice tight but impactful bass with crystal clear vocals - the Wireless plays this with great ambiance.

Anamanaguchi - Planet: A complex mix of percussion sounds and hummed vocals. The bells and other high-frequency percussion are highly detailed, and while the bass line has impact, there's little detail. The Wireless does this justice.

Armin van Buuren - J'ai Envie de Toi (Orig Mix feat Gaia): Decent bass impacts, breathy vocals, lots of fun noise - the Wireless plays this perfectly.

Avicii - Feeling Good: Classic female vocal in movie-theme style - the Wireless renders the singing in a very natural way.

Carl Kennedy-Tommy Trash ft Rosie Henshaw - Blackwater (Original Master): Nice strong bass impacts, female vocal, rendered delectably by the Wireless.

Crystal Castles - Wrath of God: Atmospheric tune with vocal sound effects and strong bass line, plus some unique treble percussion sounds. The Wireless brings these unique sounds to life.

Digitalism - Pogo: A driving beat with a detailed bass synth and great vocals ("There's something in the air...") - the Wireless makes this very enjoyable.

Dino Lenny-Lino Di Meglio - We Will Make It: Atmospheric tune with mixed vocals - the female vocal is a special treat with the Wireless.

DJ Shadow - Building Steam With A Grain Of Salt: High-pitched tones and strong deep piano chords with a hummed female vocal - ultra-cool with the Wireless.

Fairmont - Poble Sec: Awesome bass impacts with nifty pingy guitar/synth effects. I discovered this tune at the time I purchased my 3rd M100 - the Wireless covers this perfectly.

Giuseppe Ottaviani - Lost for Words (On Air Mix feat Amba Shepherd): Strong bass impacts behind a female voice - a large-scale sweeping sonic image reminiscent of epic adventures in an exotic land. The Wireless is running on high octane here.

Hecq - Enceladus (With Skyence): Prodigious bass and clean at that. This tune's melody is more abstract than most of the others here, but the Wireless makes it a pleasurable listen.

Katy B - Crying For No Reason (Tom Shorterz Remix): Oh, I love Katy B. The vocal mix here is awesome, the bass is solid - this is Wireless at its best.

Ladytron - Destroy Everything You Touch: I first heard this in The September Issue film and soundtrack, as the backdrop for the opening catwalk (watch Andre smile at 1:51 - all you need to know) - the Wireless plays this amazing tune perfectly.

Lee and Malinda - Truth Will Set You Free (V-Moda Mix): Lee Kalt is the master, this is the masterpiece. The drum (or tom-tom) hits here have a very realistic skin-tone, the female vocal is seamlessly integrated into the driving beat, and the synth effects also blend well - the Wireless just owns this.

Markus Schulz - Mainstage: The granddaddy of bass is in this track, and the Wireless plays it smooth and clean.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 17, 2015 4:51 PM PST


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