Profile for Richard Tsuyuki > Reviews

Browse

Richard Tsuyuki's Profile

Customer Reviews: 9
Top Reviewer Ranking: 6,089,552
Helpful Votes: 63


Community Features
Review Discussion Boards
Top Reviewers

Guidelines: Learn more about the ins and outs of Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Richard Tsuyuki RSS Feed

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
The Staff of Serapis (Heroes of Olympus, The)
The Staff of Serapis (Heroes of Olympus, The)
Price: $1.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Rick riordan is awesome, November 26, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I loved seeing annabeth and Sadie meet! Now I'd like to see everyone all together.... That would be so cool


Adventures in Formosa
Adventures in Formosa
by Antonio Graceffo
Edition: Paperback
Price: $13.46
6 used & new from $8.75

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good though uneven, January 5, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Adventures in Formosa (Paperback)
An enjoyable set of loosely linked stories and articles about the author's life in Taiwan as an adventure writer. Not exactly highbrow literature, but easy to keep reading. Graceffo clearly exaggerates and plays up the quirky characters, the eccentricities of Taiwanese culture and his own overreactions (at one point he even seems jaded with the formula - do something adventurous, make jokes about being unprepared, make fun of a goofy Taiwanese person), but no harm done. Having spent some time in Taiwan myself I can vouch for the many cultural oddities from a Westerner's point of view. The tone of the book switches abruptly from comical (mis)adventure to sincere enjoyment of group experiences to martial arts training to describing Graceffo's struggles as a writer. Depending on what you're looking for, you might skim quickly through parts of the book.

Geez, though, Antonio, learn to use a spell-checker. The lack of editing gets to the point where it's distracting - typos almost every page. At one point he refers to "blue skies, decorated with white crowds". I think Thor Horendall is Thor Heyerdahl, and Steven Severen is Tim Severin, but who knows?


Disney's Greatest Hits
Disney's Greatest Hits

1.0 out of 5 stars Warning: Not Available, July 25, 2005
This review is from: Disney's Greatest Hits (Audio CD)
I recently tried to order this item, and after several months of approving delays, was informed that Amazon could not locate a copy. This item should be removed.


Rogue Warrior
Rogue Warrior
by John Weisman
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: $7.09
240 used & new from $0.01

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Three Soldiers' Stories, June 13, 2005
I've never served in the military, but I have great respect for those who follow that kind of life. I also have great interest in history, military strategy and tactics, and behavior in combat situations. I therefore checked out the following special-forces-related books from the library: Rogue Warrior, by Marcinko, Combat Swimmer, by Gormly, and Inside Delta Force, by Haney.

Marcinko's book is a classic testosterone-driven, adolescent Hollywood adventure story. I mean that in a (mostly) good way. The author's focus is on himself, on his grand escapades, and his ability to destroy his enemies, whether at war or in the chain of command. It makes for a fun read, although I never knew how much Marcinko might be inflating his exploits.

Gormly is in many ways the anti-Marcinko. Of course they knew each other, and Gormly goes into some detail about inheriting Marcinko's SEAL team and getting the house back in order. But more than that, Marcinko represents the unihibited ego, breaking all the rules and doing whatever he wants. Gormly is all about responsibility and chain of command. Don't get me wrong; he's not at all boring, but definitely comes off as a stiffer sort of character. I'd rather work for Gormly (more job security; less likely to get killed unexpectedly) but I'd rather have a beer with Marcinko (though too much of that, and you probably increase your chances of getting killed unexpectedly).

Haney strikes somewhat of a balance. He's more individualistic than Gormly, but more disciplined than Marcinko. He's also the best writer of the three, with a good mix of gritty reality and genuine philosophical reflection. That's probably why I liked his book the best. Marcinko's book is a fun ride, like a blockbuster action movie, but in the end didn't leave me with much to think about. After reading Gormly's book, I admired the man a great deal but didn't particularly like him. Haney provides all the adventure but he's clearly more of a thinker than the other two, and I can imagine a long, fascinating evening's conversation over a bottle of scotch.

I suspect that you would find all three types of individuals (and many more) in the military, and you probably need all of them to get the job done. All three memoirs are highly entertaining and quick reads. Which you prefer probably depends to some extent on your own personality.


Combat Swimmer: Memoir of a Navy Seal
Combat Swimmer: Memoir of a Navy Seal
by Robert A. Gormly
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
109 used & new from $0.01

35 of 38 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Three Soldiers' Stories, June 13, 2005
I've never served in the military, but I have great respect for those who follow that kind of life. I also have great interest in history, military strategy and tactics, and behavior in combat situations. I therefore checked out the following special-forces-related books from the library: Rogue Warrior, by Marcinko, Combat Swimmer, by Gormly, and Inside Delta Force, by Haney.

Marcinko's book is a classic testosterone-driven, adolescent Hollywood adventure story. I mean that in a (mostly) good way. The author's focus is on himself, on his grand escapades, and his ability to destroy his enemies, whether at war or in the chain of command. It makes for a fun read, although I never knew how much Marcinko might be inflating his exploits.

Gormly is in many ways the anti-Marcinko. Of course they knew each other, and Gormly goes into some detail about inheriting Marcinko's SEAL team and getting the house back in order. But more than that, Marcinko represents the unihibited ego, breaking all the rules and doing whatever he wants. Gormly is all about responsibility and chain of command. Don't get me wrong; he's not at all boring, but definitely comes off as a stiffer sort of character. I'd rather work for Gormly (more job security; less likely to get killed unexpectedly) but I'd rather have a beer with Marcinko (though too much of that, and you probably increase your chances of getting killed unexpectedly).

Haney strikes somewhat of a balance. He's more individualistic than Gormly, but more disciplined than Marcinko. He's also the best writer of the three, with a good mix of gritty reality and genuine philosophical reflection. That's probably why I liked his book the best. Marcinko's book is a fun ride, like a blockbuster action movie, but in the end didn't leave me with much to think about. After reading Gormly's book, I admired the man a great deal but didn't particularly like him. Haney provides all the adventure but he's clearly more of a thinker than the other two, and I can imagine a long, fascinating evening's conversation over a bottle of scotch.

I suspect that you would find all three types of individuals (and many more) in the military, and you probably need all of them to get the job done. All three memoirs are highly entertaining and quick reads. Which you prefer probably depends to some extent on your own personality.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 18, 2014 11:42 AM PDT


Inside Delta Force: The Story of America's Elite Counterterrorist Unit
Inside Delta Force: The Story of America's Elite Counterterrorist Unit
by Eric L. Haney
Edition: Hardcover
86 used & new from $0.03

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Three Soldiers' Stories, June 13, 2005
I've never served in the military, but I have great respect for those who follow that kind of life. I also have great interest in history, military strategy and tactics, and behavior in combat situations. I therefore checked out the following special-forces-related books from the library: Rogue Warrior, by Marcinko, Combat Swimmer, by Gormly, and Inside Delta Force, by Haney.

Marcinko's book is a classic testosterone-driven, adolescent Hollywood adventure story. I mean that in a (mostly) good way. The author's focus is on himself, on his grand escapades, and his ability to destroy his enemies, whether at war or in the chain of command. It makes for a fun read, although I never knew how much Marcinko might be inflating his exploits.

Gormly is in many ways the anti-Marcinko. Of course they knew each other, and Gormly goes into some detail about inheriting Marcinko's SEAL team and getting the house back in order. But more than that, Marcinko represents the unihibited ego, breaking all the rules and doing whatever he wants. Gormly is all about responsibility and chain of command. Don't get me wrong; he's not at all boring, but definitely comes off as a stiffer sort of character. I'd rather work for Gormly (more job security; less likely to get killed unexpectedly) but I'd rather have a beer with Marcinko (though too much of that, and you probably increase your chances of getting killed unexpectedly).

Haney strikes somewhat of a balance. He's more individualistic than Gormly, but more disciplined than Marcinko. He's also the best writer of the three, with a good mix of gritty reality and genuine philosophical reflection. That's probably why I liked his book the best. Marcinko's book is a fun ride, like a blockbuster action movie, but in the end didn't leave me with much to think about. After reading Gormly's book, I admired the man a great deal but didn't particularly like him. Haney provides all the adventure but he's clearly more of a thinker than the other two, and I can imagine a long, fascinating evening's conversation over a bottle of scotch.

I suspect that you would find all three types of individuals (and many more) in the military, and you probably need all of them to get the job done. All three memoirs are highly entertaining and quick reads. Which you prefer probably depends to some extent on your own personality.


Western Architecture: A Survey from Ancient Greece to the Present (World of Art)
Western Architecture: A Survey from Ancient Greece to the Present (World of Art)
by Ian Sutton
Edition: Paperback
Price: $17.42
76 used & new from $0.32

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Comparison of Three Popular Architectural Histories, June 13, 2005
As an architectural novice who recently decided to learn more about it, I checked three books out of the library: The Story of Western Architecture, by Risebero; Western Architecture, by Sutton, and The Story of Architecture, by Glancey. This is a brief comparison of the three.

Sutton: An attractive book with lots of coverage (I think more comprehensive than Risebero and certainly more than Glancey) and photos. The photos are black & white and unfortunately small due to the relatively small format of the (paperback edition) book. The text has a somewhat academic tone and concentrates on the buildings rather than the social theories expounded in Risebero's book.

Risebero: An impressive book with many detailed line drawings but no photographs. The line drawings obviously lack the details and total impact of photos but they also allow the author to emphasize and isolate features of interest; photos can frequently confuse the eye with an excess of detail. Also includes sketches that illustrate building principles, e.g., what "pendentives" are, ways to intersect arches, etc. Risebero provides socio-cultural material that attempts to explain the reasons behind historical trends, movements, etc. I suspect this material is controversial among architectural historians, as such attempts usually are, but I lack the background to judge whether it exhibits strong biases, political agendas, etc.

Glancey: A large-format book with beautiful color photographs. The only book of the three to include non-Western architecture, such as Africa, Asia, etc. The text is large-font and more simplistic in tone and content than the above two.

Conclusions: Sutton was somewhat dry, lacking the feeling of continuity created by a narrative line. In contrast, Risebero's social commentary made for a better "story" (hence the title, I guess), but I did have the sense of social ideas being imposed upon me without having the background to evaluate them. Glancey's book was quite short and simple - perhaps almost more of a young-adult sort of book. If I were to pick a winner, it would be Risebero, for excellent line drawings and a storytelling feel that kept my interest. The only real lack was some nice big color photos (a la Glancey), but you can't have everything.


The story of Western architecture
The story of Western architecture
by Bill Risebero
Edition: Hardcover
21 used & new from $0.47

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Comparison of Three Popular Architectural Histories, June 13, 2005
As an architectural novice who recently decided to learn more about it, I checked three books out of the library: The Story of Western Architecture, by Risebero; Western Architecture, by Sutton, and The Story of Architecture, by Glancey. This is a brief comparison of the three.

Risebero: This is an impressive book with many detailed line drawings but no photographs. The line drawings obviously lack the details and total impact of photos but they also allow the author to emphasize and isolate features of interest; photos can frequently confuse the eye with an excess of detail. Also includes sketches that illustrate building principles, e.g., what "pendentives" are, ways to intersect arches, etc. Risebero provides socio-cultural material that attempts to explain the reasons behind historical trends, movements, etc. I suspect this material is controversial among architectural historians, as such attempts usually are, but I lack the background to judge whether it exhibits strong biases, political agendas, etc.

Sutton: An attractive book with lots of coverage (I think more comprehensive than Risebero) and photos. The photos are black & white and unfortunately small due to the relatively small format of the (paperback edition) book. The text has a somewhat academic tone and concentrates on the buildings rather than the social theories expounded in Risebero's book.

Glancey: A large-format book with beautiful color photographs. The only book of the three to include non-Western architecture, such as Africa, Asia, etc. The text is large-font and more simplistic in tone and content than the above two.

Conclusions: Sutton was somewhat dry, lacking the feeling of continuity created by a narrative line. In contrast, Risebero's social commentary made for a better "story" (hence the title, I guess), but I did have the sense of social ideas being imposed upon me without having the background to evaluate them. Glancey's book was quite short and simple - perhaps almost more of a young-adult sort of book. If I were to pick a winner, it would be Risebero, for excellent line drawings and a storytelling feel that kept my interest. The only real lack was some nice big color photos (a la Glancey), but you can't have everything.


Horatio Hornblower Vol. 1 - The Duel
Horatio Hornblower Vol. 1 - The Duel
DVD ~ Ioan Gruffudd
23 used & new from $0.45

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not Your Forester's Hornblower, February 23, 2005
While this production is excellent, I cannot give it full marks as an adaptation of the books. One of the primary themes of the books is the contrast between the inner man (plagued by self-doubt, fear, seasickness) and the exterior (cold and commanding). They form an extended essay on Forester's view of the nature of command, cowardice and bravery, and the human will fighting with emotions. Much of what raises the Hornblower books above other swashbucklers of the genre goes on inside Hornblower's head. Obviously this is very hard to portray on the screen, and this series more or less declines to try. Great production values, great historical adventure, but not the Hornblower I know and love.


Page: 1