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Sennheiser HD 202 II Professional Headphones (Black)
Sennheiser HD 202 II Professional Headphones (Black)
Price: $24.99
68 used & new from $13.61

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Average ~$20 headphones with very good bass, December 2, 2012
In writing this review, keep in mind that I'm comparing this set of headphones to 6 other ones: Sennheiser HD 280, Sony MDR-7506, Sony MDR-V6, Sennheiser HD HD201, Monoprice MEP-839, and JVC HA-RX500. The first 3 can usually be purchased for $60-$90 (depending on which headphone and if you can find it on sale) and are used by many as studio monitors. The latter 3 are all ~$20 headphones and sit in the same category as the Sennheiser HD202.

Of course, as we all know, whether you like a particular pair of headphones depends on what you plan on doing with them and what you listen to. Personally, I listen to a mix of music ranging from classical to pop to dance. I'm not what one would deem a "bass head" - I like my headphones to faithfully reproduce the entire audio spectrum. Knowing my requirements, the way I would rate my headphones would be Sony 7506 = Sony V6 > Sennheiser HD 280 > Sennheiser HD 201 > Monoprice MEP-839 > JVC HA-RX500 = Sennheiser HD 202.

In my comments below I make deliberate use of my adjectives (i.e. excellent > very good > good > average).

Not surprisingly, the more expensive headphones sound the best. The Sony 7506/V6 have very good bass and excellent mids and treble frequencies which help bring out vocals. The Sennheiser HD 280's have excellent bass (better than the Sony's) and very good mids and treble (but not as good as the Sony's).

Of the ~$20 headphones, the Sennheiser HD 201 has the best overall balance with very good bass, mids, and treble - its main deficiency is that it needs more power to drive; they are noticeably quieter than the other headphones at the same volume setting. However, once you turn up the volume, I feel they are the most balanced of the $20 headphones.

The Monoprice MEP-839 falls next in terms of audio balance. It has very good bass and good mids and treble. It doesn't bring out mids and treble as well as the HD 201, but it is superior to the JVC HA-RX500 and Sennheiser HD 202. When compared to the 7506, V6, and HD280 I feel the bass is a slight bit muddier - with the more expensive headphones, the bass seems cleaner and has more of a punch. That said, the MEP-839 low frequencies extend as deep as the HD 280 and more than the 7506/V6. The reason I rate the MEP-839 bass as very good, instead of excellent, has to do with the fact it sounds a bit "muddy". The MEP-839's are relatively easy to drive and don't require the volume to be cranked up.

Finally, there are the JVC HA-RX500 and Sennheiser HD 202. I feel these 2 are pretty similar in audio quality. They both have very good bass with average mids and treble. The HA-RX500 is more comfortable than the HD 202, primarily because they are circumaural and sit around your ears instead of the supra-aural HD 202 which actually rests on your ear. I can see why bass heads would like the HA-RX500 and HD202 - they emphasize bass over the mids/treble. That being said, I prefer my headphones to be balanced.


JVC HARX500 Over-the-Ear Headphones
JVC HARX500 Over-the-Ear Headphones
Offered by DigitalKynect
Price: $20.82
90 used & new from $15.35

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Average ~$20 headphones with very good bass, December 2, 2012
In writing this review, keep in mind that I'm comparing this set of headphones to 6 other ones: Sennheiser HD 280, Sony MDR-7506, Sony MDR-V6, Sennheiser HD HD202, Sennheiser HD201, and Monoprice MEP-839. The first 3 can usually be purchased for $60-$90 (depending on which headphone and if you can find it on sale) and are used by many as studio monitors. The latter 3 are all ~$20 headphones and sit in the same category as the JVC HA-RX500.

Of course, as we all know, whether you like a particular pair of headphones depends on what you plan on doing with them and what you listen to. Personally, I listen to a mix of music ranging from classical to pop to dance. I'm not what one would deem a "bass head" - I like my headphones to faithfully reproduce the entire audio spectrum. Knowing my requirements, the way I would rate my headphones would be Sony 7506 = Sony V6 > Sennheiser HD 280 > Sennheiser HD 201 > Monoprice MEP-839 > JVC HA-RX500 = Sennheiser HD 202.

In my comments below I make deliberate use of my adjectives (i.e. excellent > very good > good > average).

Not surprisingly, the more expensive headphones sound the best. The Sony 7506/V6 have very good bass and excellent mids and treble frequencies which help bring out vocals. The Sennheiser HD 280's have excellent bass (better than the Sony's) and very good mids and treble (but not as good as the Sony's).

Of the ~$20 headphones, the Sennheiser HD 201 has the best overall balance with very good bass, mids, and treble - its main deficiency is that it needs more power to drive; they are noticeably quieter than the other headphones at the same volume setting. However, once you turn up the volume, I feel they are the most balanced of the $20 headphones.

The Monoprice MEP-839 falls next in terms of audio balance. It has very good bass and good mids and treble. It doesn't bring out mids and treble as well as the HD 201, but it is superior to the JVC HA-RX500 and Sennheiser HD 202. When compared to the 7506, V6, and HD280 I feel the bass is a slight bit muddier - with the more expensive headphones, the bass seems cleaner and has more of a punch. That said, the MEP-839 low frequencies extend as deep as the HD 280 and more than the 7506/V6. The reason I rate the MEP-839 bass as very good, instead of excellent, has to do with the fact it sounds a bit "muddy". The MEP-839's are relatively easy to drive and don't require the volume to be cranked up.

Finally, there are the JVC HA-RX500 and Sennheiser HD 202. I feel these 2 are pretty similar in audio quality. They both have very good bass with average mids and treble. The HA-RX500 is more comfortable than the HD 202, primarily because they are circumaural and sit around your ears instead of the supra-aural HD 202 which actually rests on your ear. I can see why bass heads would like the HA-RX500 and HD202 - they emphasize bass over the mids/treble. That being said, I prefer my headphones to be balanced.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 3, 2013 9:28 PM PST


Sennheiser HD201 Lightweight Over-Ear Binaural Headphones
Sennheiser HD201 Lightweight Over-Ear Binaural Headphones
Price: $22.70
103 used & new from $11.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best balanced headphones for ~$20, December 2, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
In writing this review, keep in mind that I'm comparing this set of headphones to 6 other ones: Sennheiser HD 280, Sony MDR-7506, Sony MDR-V6, Sennheiser HD HD202, Monoprice MEP-839, and JVC HA-RX500. The first 3 can usually be purchased for $60-$90 (depending on which headphone and if you can find it on sale) and are used by many as studio monitors. The latter 3 are all ~$20 headphones and sit in the same category as the Sennheiser HD201.

Of course, as we all know, whether you like a particular pair of headphones depends on what you plan on doing with them and what you listen to. Personally, I listen to a mix of music ranging from classical to pop to dance. I'm not what one would deem a "bass head" - I like my headphones to faithfully reproduce the entire audio spectrum. Knowing my requirements, the way I would rate my headphones would be Sony 7506 = Sony V6 > Sennheiser HD 280 > Sennheiser HD 201 > Monoprice MEP-839 > JVC HA-RX500 = Sennheiser HD 202.

In my comments below I make deliberate use of my adjectives (i.e. excellent > very good > good > average).

Not surprisingly, the more expensive headphones sound the best. The Sony 7506/V6 have very good bass and excellent mids and treble frequencies which help bring out vocals. The Sennheiser HD 280's have excellent bass (better than the Sony's) and very good mids and treble (but not as good as the Sony's).

Of the ~$20 headphones, the Sennheiser HD 201 has the best overall balance with very good bass, mids, and treble - its main deficiency is that it needs more power to drive; they are noticeably quieter than the other headphones at the same volume setting. However, once you turn up the volume, I feel they are the most balanced of the $20 headphones.

The Monoprice MEP-839 falls next in terms of audio balance. It has very good bass and good mids and treble. It doesn't bring out mids and treble as well as the HD 201, but it is superior to the JVC HA-RX500 and Sennheiser HD 202. When compared to the 7506, V6, and HD280 I feel the bass is a slight bit muddier - with the more expensive headphones, the bass seems cleaner and has more of a punch. That said, the MEP-839 low frequencies extend as deep as the HD 280 and more than the 7506/V6. The reason I rate the MEP-839 bass as very good, instead of excellent, has to do with the fact it sounds a bit "muddy". The MEP-839's are relatively easy to drive and don't require the volume to be cranked up.

Finally, there are the JVC HA-RX500 and Sennheiser HD 202. I feel these 2 are pretty similar in audio quality. They both have very good bass with average mids and treble. The HA-RX500 is more comfortable than the HD 202, primarily because they are circumaural and sit around your ears instead of the supra-aural HD 202 which actually rests on your ear. I can see why bass heads would like the HA-RX500 and HD202 - they emphasize bass over the mids/treble. That being said, I prefer my headphones to be balanced.


Bellafina Maturo Violin Case 4/4 Size
Bellafina Maturo Violin Case 4/4 Size
Offered by Woodwind and Brasswind
Price: $54.99
3 used & new from $54.99

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Adequate violin case, September 14, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Pros: Inexpensive. Lightweight. Includes shoulder strap and thick cloth to cover violin. Has 2 large compartments (1 with a covering flap, the other one open) that can easily hold shoulder rest, strings and rosin. Item shipped and received quickly.

Cons: Tight fit. Suspension padding is not very soft and doesn't have much of a "cushy" feel.

I bought this case after reading reviews on several Bellafina cases. I wasn't looking for anything too fancy - I just wanted a new violin case to replace the old tattered one that holds the violin I seldom play anymore. My main requirements for a case included oblong (i.e. rectangular) shape, suspension padding, and able to accommodate 2 bows & shoulder rest. Again since I don't play this particular violin too much and don't intend to move it much, I didn't need a rugged case. I figured this case would fit my requirements nicely. Now that I've received it, my feelings on it are mainly 'meh'. Overall, it's an OK case, but I guess I have 2 significant disappointments with it. First, as was mentioned in reviews of other Bellafina cases, I was a little surprised to find that my full-size instrument almost didn't fit into this case. It fits so snugly (almost tightly) that without closing the velcro loop that anchors the violin neck, I can invert the case and my violin wouldn't fall or slide out of the case. My invoice definitely says I was shipped the 4/4 size. Second, compared to the other suspension violin case I own, the suspension padding of this case isn't as soft. I cannot press into the padding easily with my finger, and when I finally applied enough pressure to make a dent, it didn't pop back into shape. It's definitely not foam or memory foam, and it makes me worry a little about how much shock it's absorbing vs how much it's transmitting to the instrument. I'm going to go ahead and keep the violin case because I don't want to go through the hassle of returning it and it does the bare basics that I need it to do.

Addendum: I have since swapped another full-size violin to be used with this case. The second instrument is a little shorter than the one I refer to above and fits into the Maturo case less tightly. I am much more comfortable with the way it fits, and I'm happier with my purchase now.


Mace Group Macally 12" iBook Memory Foam Case - carrying case ( SPONGE12 )
Mace Group Macally 12" iBook Memory Foam Case - carrying case ( SPONGE12 )

4.0 out of 5 stars Provides good protection - rubber on zipper pull tab breaks off easily, November 25, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I've had this memory foam case for my iBook for several years now. The case is made of a thick amount of memory foam that protects the screen and battery sides of the laptop very well. However, the zipper, which goes around 3 sides of the laptop, affords little padding. Fortunately, the case is specifically made to fit the iBook perfectly so there is no wiggle room once the laptop is in. However this also means that you have to pay a little bit more attention when putting in your iBook or the case won't close. The main reason I took off a star for this case was because the zipper pull tab is really small and to make it more manageable, Macally encased it in a piece of rubber that is ~1 inch long. However, I've had two cases with the same problem where the rubber would eventually crack and break off and making the zipper pull tab hard to grab. Overall, a good perfectly-fitted case for my iBook.


Maha PowerEx MH-C9000 WizardOne Charger-Analyzer for 4 AA/AAA Batteries
Maha PowerEx MH-C9000 WizardOne Charger-Analyzer for 4 AA/AAA Batteries
Offered by Quality Deals
Price: $57.49
13 used & new from $55.97

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent charger - could almost be the only charger you need, November 25, 2010
I've owned the Powerex MH-C9000 and La Crosse BC-900 chargers for over 3 years now. Most of the time the only thing that determines which one I use is which one has available battery slots.

Similarities: Both are excellent smart chargers that are better than pretty much anything else out on the market. Both require reading the instruction manual in order to get the most of each charger, but it's worth taking the time. Both require an AC-DC wall adapter which makes them bulky for travel. Both have 4 independent battery slots. Both have selectable charging currents so you can choose between slower/faster charging times. Both charge only AA and AAA batteries.

Differences: The La Crosse charger is a little smaller than the Powerex, and (unlike the Powerex) it's display is not backlit (to some that's a plus [doesn't illuminate the room at night] and to others it's a minus [not as easy to read]). The La Crosse does not have a break-in function like the Powerex does - this function is meant to be used on brand new batteries or older batteries that have gone unused for a while. I haven't used the Break-In function too much so all I can really say about it is that it's a long procedure but does seem to result in a battery with a pretty good amount of charge. One of the biggest functional differences between the 2 chargers is how they handle suboptimal batteries. The La Crosse charger occasionally has problems recognizing a battery that has been drained too much - in these situations you have to stick the battery in a dumb charger for a short while (30 seconds is enough) before it will recognize the battery and start charging it. On the other hand, the Maha charger is much more picky when detecting a battery with a high internal resistance and refusing to charge the battery - in these situations, I have to charge the battery in the La Crosse charger. This has only happened to me with really old rechargeables; the batteries are still usable once the La Crosse charges them up so I don't totally agree with the Powerex charger not wanting to charge them. Both chargers have their own unique operating interface. I don't particularly care for one interface over the other - they're just different.

Summary: You can't go wrong with either the Powerex MH-C9000 or La Crosse BC-900 chargers. The best thing I did was to pair these chargers with low self discharge (LSD) NiMH's. I've transitioned away from standard (non-LSD) rechargeables because I'd always be worrying about having batteries with mismatched charge levels due to self-discharge. Now I always have charged batteries around, and many of the items that I use batteries for (wireless mice, remotes, etc) operate much longer with LSD's. If it were an option I'd rate both the La Crosse and Powerex chargers with 4.5 stars out of 5 since neither is perfect. The La Crosse has issues recognizing over-drained batteries and the Powerex has issues charging really old batteries that may have a higher internal resistance. Still, these two are far better than almost every other battery charger out there.


La Crosse Technology BC-9009 AlphaPower Battery Charger (Discontinued by Manufacturer)
La Crosse Technology BC-9009 AlphaPower Battery Charger (Discontinued by Manufacturer)

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent charger - could almost be the only charger you need, November 25, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I've owned the La Crosse BC-900 and Powerex MH-C9000 chargers for over 3 years now. Most of the time the only thing that determines which one I use is which one has available battery slots.

Similarities: Both are excellent smart chargers that are better than pretty much anything else out on the market. Both require reading the instruction manual in order to get the most of each charger, but it's worth taking the time. Both require an AC-DC wall adapter which makes them bulky for travel. Both have 4 independent battery slots. Both have selectable charging currents so you can choose between slower/faster charging times. Both charge only AA and AAA batteries.

Differences: The La Crosse charger is a little smaller than the Powerex, and it's display is not backlit (to some that's a plus [doesn't illuminate the room at night] and to others it's a minus [not as easy to read]). The La Crosse does not have a break-in function like the Powerex does - this function is meant to be used on brand new batteries or older batteries that have gone unused for a while. I haven't used the Break-In function too much so all I can really say about it is that it's a long procedure but does seem to result in a battery with a pretty good amount of charge. One of the biggest functional differences between the 2 chargers is how they handle suboptimal batteries. The La Crosse charger occasionally has problems recognizing a battery that has been drained too much - in these situations you have to stick the battery in a dumb charger for a short while (30 seconds is enough) before it will recognize the battery and start charging it. On the other hand, the Maha charger is much more picky when detecting a battery with a high internal resistance and refusing to charge the battery - in these situations, I have to charge the battery in the La Crosse charger. This has only happened to me with really old rechargeables; the batteries are still usable once the La Crosse charges them up so I don't totally agree with the Powerex charger not wanting to charge them. Both chargers have their own unique operating interface. I don't particularly care for one interface over the other - they're just different.

Summary: You can't go wrong with either the La Crosse BC-900 or Powerex MH-C9000 chargers. The best thing I did was to pair these chargers with low self discharge (LSD) NiMH's. I've transitioned away from standard (non-LSD) rechargeables because I'd always be worrying about having batteries with mismatched charge levels due to self-discharge. Now I always have charged batteries around, and many of the items that I use batteries for (wireless mice, remotes, etc) operate much longer with LSD's. If it were an option I'd rate both the La Crosse and Powerex chargers with 4.5 stars out of 5 since neither is perfect. The La Crosse has issues recognizing over-drained batteries and the Powerex has issues charging really old batteries that may have a higher internal resistance. Still, these two are far better than almost every other battery charger out there.


Motorola H500 Bluetooth Wireless Headset (Soft Black)
Motorola H500 Bluetooth Wireless Headset (Soft Black)

2.0 out of 5 stars Average Headset - Below Average Customer Support/Returns, March 20, 2008
I received a black H500 headset as a Christmas present. I used it successfully for about 3 weeks before having a major problem. First, the headset paired with my Samsung M500 phone very easily. However, that was about all that was easy with the headset. Like so many other people have mentioned about Bluetooth headsets in general, I had to speak rather loudly in order for people to hear me. I could hear other people pretty clearly and reasonably loud enough. The battery life is pretty decent.

The ear hook included is initially shaped for people with big ears. I have small ears so I had to do some major bending of the ear hook in order to get the thing to sit properly and give me decent sound quality. The problem is the hook has an easy tendency to widen which means I have to reshape it periodically and I have to be careful when I'm taking it off my ear.

The biggest problem I had with the unit is that the microphone eventually crapped out on me after I had it for about 3 weeks. Since I was used to having to speak up with it when I first tried it out, it took me a while to realize that people I were talking to were hearing absolutely nothing (because the microphone was broken) instead of just having a hard time hearing me. I eventually called up Motorola to get a Return Authorization #, which the customer service representative was relatively efficient in doing after getting all my personal information. I then sent them my defective unit and waited to receive my replacement unit. After waiting 3 weeks and still having not received anything, I finally gave them a call. It turns out, they didn't even process my return because, for some reason, my RA# was already closed. Then the CSR told me that she needed me to verify my address even though I had provided my address during the first call to Motorola and I had included my address on a note accompanying my return. Motorola is quoting me 3-5 days until I receive my replacement unit. Needless to say, this experience has left me very unimpressed with Motorola's customer service.


ADC Otoscope/Ophthalmoscope Set, 2.5V
ADC Otoscope/Ophthalmoscope Set, 2.5V
Price: $126.90
12 used & new from $114.99

72 of 72 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect for students, September 20, 2007
This ADC set (ADC #5210 Standard 2.5V Diagnostic Set) is great for medical students. Several of my classmates ended up shelling out over four Franklins for a Welch-Allyn set. The WA set has an awesome warranty, but I couldn't justify paying that much money for something I wasn't going to be using that much. Aside from the difference in warranty, this set drives its light at 2.5V whereas the more expensive WA sets drive theirs at no less than 3.5V and are probably brighter. Saying that, I had no problem looking into people's ears and eyes with this ADC set. Given its performance and cost, I'm very happy with the set.

The ADC set includes the battery holder (2 C batteries not included), the ophthalmoscope head, the otoscope head, 3 permanent specula (each with a different size opening), 10 disposable specula, and the disposable specula adapter. It all comes in a relatively sturdy rubber case.

Like I said earlier, this set is perfect for the medical student who is already several thousands of grand in debt and is going to get limited use out of an otoscope/ophthalmoscope diagnostic set. If my interests eventually steer me into a residency where I'm looking at the holes in peoples' heads everyday, I'll invest in a top-of-the-line diagnostic set then.


Logitech MediaPlay Cordless Mouse- Blue
Logitech MediaPlay Cordless Mouse- Blue
3 used & new from $59.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Works great with a Mac, February 11, 2007
I own two of these mice. One is a refurbished one in Silver/Blue/Black color (as you see pictured on the Amazon website), and another is a Black/Red one. I use both of my mice with Macs. I'll be honest, I didn't buy the mouse for its multimedia features and ability to be used as a remote. In fact, Logitech doesn't even advertise compatibility with Macs, but I know most USB mice have no problems working with Macs.

There is no Mac software from Logitech for this mouse, so you can't normally take advantage of all the buttons. Using the standard Apple Mac OS X drivers under 10.4.8, you get access to regular clicking, right-clicking, scrolling up and down and scrolling left and right (via the tilt-wheel). The other buttons don't do anything.

Fortunately, there is an EXCELLENT shareware mouse driver for Macs called USB Overdrive. Using USB Overdrive, you can assign each of the 14 buttons on this mouse to a different function, which is simply amazing. The combination of USB Overdrive and this mouse is a multi-button mouse lover's dream (note that USB Overdrive also allows you to specify different commands on an application to application basis).

I'm quite found of the operation of the mouse, but how about the ergonomics? Well I have small to mid-size hands, and I find the mouse to be a very nice size and fit. Every button is within easy reach and it's pretty easy to pick up the mouse when you reach the end of a table/mousepad/etc. It does require AA batteries and they do tend to make the mouse kind of heavy, but I rarely have to pick it up so it's not much of an issue for me. If you're really concerned about the weight, the mouse will also operate off a single AA battery. A nice thing is that it has an on/off switch on the bottom if you want to conserve battery power if you know you won't be using the mouse for a while.

So if I like this mouse so much, why am I rating it only four stars? Mainly because of value. To me a multi-button mouse is about convenience, and I can't justify paying $40-$50 for convenience when a $10-$20 will get the job done. I was able to buy my mice in the $20-$30 range and for that price I consider it a great value. If it were normally in that price range I would not hesitate to give it a full 5 stars.


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