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War And Peace (Penguin Popular Classics)
War And Peace (Penguin Popular Classics)
Price: $0.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Great translation for an ebook., January 26, 2016
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Great translation for an ebook.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 6, 2016 11:58 PM PST


Continental Grand Prix 4000 S II Road Clincher, Black, 700 x 23-Inch
Continental Grand Prix 4000 S II Road Clincher, Black, 700 x 23-Inch
Price: $50.35
125 used & new from $31.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Sidewall Failure, January 26, 2016
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Uneasy about these tires. Today my rear tire blew out after going through a moderately rough patch of roadway. The split on the sidewall looks similar to other failures that have been posted. I ordered a replacement, however I am weary about my experience today. Just glad I was not going downhill. I have been riding on Continentals for a long time, and I always considered them the most durable tires that I have used--until today. I have read here and on other forums that 4000 s I I have been plagued by these types of failures recently due to their shifts in production methods. Hope this just a fluke event.


Portrait of a Lady: An Authoritative Text, Henry James and the Novel, Reviews and Criticism (A Norton Critical Edition)
Portrait of a Lady: An Authoritative Text, Henry James and the Novel, Reviews and Criticism (A Norton Critical Edition)
by Henry James
Edition: Hardcover
27 used & new from $0.48

5.0 out of 5 stars Norton typos?, November 4, 2015
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Great novel, but typos in a Norton edition? That's disappointing and very atypical of their attention to detail. Vol. I: IV, p. 39, "Mr. Touchett's visit" should be Mrs. Touchett's visit. Small mistake, but again expect more from a Norton edition.


Father Brown: Season Two
Father Brown: Season Two
DVD ~ Various
Price: $27.39
22 used & new from $22.88

5.0 out of 5 stars The Father Brown series features Mark Williams as the crime-solving ..., October 9, 2015
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This review is from: Father Brown: Season Two (DVD)
The Father Brown series features Mark Williams as the crime-solving cleric in this entertaining collection of mysteries. The series seems a little more grounded and sure of itself in the second season from the scripts to the the character portrayals. Looking forward to the third season. Also, would be interested in any movie version with same cast.

Finally, noticed a couple of reviewers of the first season complained that this production of Father Brown was lacking in any semblance of story-line and character development to the original stories of G.K Chesterson. To evaluate this complaint, I read "The Three Tools of Death," an episode that is contained in the second season. Chesterson's prose is brilliant, but this story is over before it begins. Thus, the script writer(s) took a very short but intriguing story-line of Chesterson's and fleshed out the mystery while staying true to is original premise.


The Streets of San Francisco: Policing and the Creation of a Cosmopolitan Liberal Politics, 1950-1972 (Historical Studies of Urban America)
The Streets of San Francisco: Policing and the Creation of a Cosmopolitan Liberal Politics, 1950-1972 (Historical Studies of Urban America)
by Christopher Lowen Agee
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $45.00
43 used & new from $29.00

5.0 out of 5 stars Professor Agee tackles a difficult subject with an interesting and ..., August 19, 2015
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Professor Agee tackles a difficult subject with an interesting and informative look at San Francisco as it developed from a traditional blue-collar city into a pluralistic one that struggled with difference and diversity from 1940s through and up to the 1970s. He focuses his observations and investigation around San Francisco citizenry interactions with city government and the SFPD.

He focuses on the different types of city government models (machine vs. managerial approaches), neighborhood developments and their struggles(North Beach, Hunter's Point, and Haight-Ashbury), and grass root organizations within these communities and the police department itself. In doing so, he offers an insightful and well-documented presentation of the times and the forces of work within this crucial period in San Francisco's history.

I grew up in the Bay Area, lived in San Francisco from'72-'84, and the East Bay for a number of years and found his discussion fascinating and revealing as to the politics and temperaments of those times, districts, and movements in San Francisco.

There are other histories which take a broader view and look at those times with a focus on media, cultural, and institutional forces that shaped this time period that add another layer to Agee's discussion (e.g., Gray Brechin's "Imperial San Francisco; Kevin Starr's "Embattled Dreams"). Agee does not attempt to duplicate those stellar works, but instead he carves out a element/subject matter of SF history with a focus and intensity that deserves serious consideration by anyone interested in the myriad of forces and issues that influenced and contributed to its development.


The Harder They Come
The Harder They Come
Offered by HarperCollins Publishers
Price: $9.99

12 of 20 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The Harder They Fall, April 9, 2015
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This mess of a novel is devoid of any truly interesting characters, plot, or action.

It's trite in its portrayal of sexual lust and encounters in a very post-Updike fashion, its predictable and overwrought dystopian sense of America gone bad, and finally its inability to do anything but scratch the surface of what makes a person marked with mental illness survive in today's society by rendering Adam's alienation and rebellion as a lifeless and plastic portrait of a frontier scout on the run.

Adam has all the symptoms of a disturbed and psychotic young man without any of the reasons or sense of why. It just is. And that's not good enough for a character who represents so much turmoil and angst in today's society. Sara also seems like a cookie cutter lost soul with little or no compass. With two central characters that are vapid and unexplained, it's no wonder the story finds no sense of purpose or energy.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 22, 2015 4:49 PM PDT


Housekeeping: A Novel
Housekeeping: A Novel
Offered by Macmillan
Price: $9.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Transcendental Americana, November 15, 2014
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"Housekeeping" delivers a magical narrative of women and the age old search for identity. Their searches are wrapped in the mystical hues of the Transcendentalist movement and the weighty literary tradition that accompanied it from the very first line of the novel: "My name is Ruth." Clearly this evocation of Melville's "Call me Ishmael" establishes a tone and space that celebrates the pursuit of self with a wide open and restless wandering spirit.

The search of identity prompts appreciation and growing awareness of nature and one's relation to it. Water took the lives of Ruth's grandfather and mother and yet gives her the opportunity to discover her self: "Anyone that leans to look into a pool is the woman in the pool,anyone who looks into our eyes is the image in our eyes, and these things are true without argument, and so our thoughts reflect what passes before them."

Her aunt Sylie had taken her on a journey into the wild to witness that the power of the mind's eye is "not utterly baffled by darkness." The darkness is the unknowing self basked in the memory of loss and the pursuit of discovery with an Emersonian transparent eye that finds resolution in a pool water as they await the rumbling of train over a bridge.

Ruth comes to say that "Sylie was teaching me to walk under water." There she deals with the loss of her mother and with her aunt plots a course for herself and a life filled with meaningful drifting, one where she never like her mother had to 'right herself continually against some current that never ceased to pull'; so, her wandering self began to "(walk) forever through reachless oblivion,in the mood of one smelling night-blooming flowers."


Nora Webster: A Novel
Nora Webster: A Novel
Offered by Simon and Schuster Digital Sales Inc
Price: $9.99

10 of 14 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars "Nora Webster" never finds a comfortable pace, lacks focus and energy, October 16, 2014
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"Nora Webster" never finds a comfortable pace, lacks focus and energy, and so sadly evaporates in a mist of ambiguity. The struggles that Nora encounters upon her husband's untimely death are muted and restrained from the outset, for at the novel's opening he has already passed. Subsequently, the aftermath presents the family in the process of maintenance and survival and that's not always compelling narrative material.

The novel then seems to get stuck in that mode; not even the events of Bloody Sunday or a union strike at Nora's place of employment are able to lift it out of this mesmerizing spell of restraint. Consequently, every seeming upturn flounders and looses steam in the plotting of this story.

I just don't understand what happened here with this narrative, for Toibin is such a talented writer. His desire to paint a portait of a lady in the midst of a great tragedy seemed to hush and squelch his need to create a story with energy. He's still someone to watch and follow.


The Son
The Son
Offered by HarperCollins Publishers
Price: $12.99

3.0 out of 5 stars The Jagged Landscape of Split Narration, January 19, 2014
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This review is from: The Son (Kindle Edition)
This novel has some great moments. However, the organization and multiple narratives leave one with a fractured sense of time and plot. To weave such a tapestry of voices and events into a compelling story-line requires a focus and tracking that Meyers does not achieve. Eli's sections were by far the best. At times the prose seems to flatten out the emotions and characters in a deliberate attempt to be hard-boiled, or matter of fact. It's as if the prose has been raked clean of the rhythms that would have sustained a semblance of energy, overstuffed with lyrical musings and wordplay that never quite gels with the tasks of plot and character development, and left only to flounder in the jagged landscape of split narration. Regardless, I look forward to Meyer's future works, ones were he can distance himself from the influences of the MFA styles and trends.


The Woodvilles: The Wars of the Roses and England's Most Infamous Family
The Woodvilles: The Wars of the Roses and England's Most Infamous Family

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars New Perspectives on the Woodvilles and the War of the Roses, December 29, 2013
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Susan Higginbotham's "The Woodvilles" addresses a family that often has been regarded as nothing short of notorious and even imbued with hints of sorcery in its ascent into the royal circles of medieval England.

She aptly and convincingly dispels many of those claims and attacks with a preponderance of evidence that counters earlier accounts of the fractious times and events that came to be known as "The War of Roses".

Furthermore, she dismisses claims by earlier historians like Paul Murray Kendall and Michael Hicks as preposterous in their attempts to shift blame from Richard III to the Woodvilles in the death of the Edward IV's young sons; the claims by these same historians that the Duke of Buckingham was possibly involved is also summarily discarded as irrelevant in her account of the young princesses' deaths.

Her efforts to clear the Woodvilles ring true given her persuasive arguments based on a number of important connections and facts surrounding their relationships and presence in the royal families of the times. She gives a fuller understanding and appreciation of the Woodvilles, as Kendall did Richard III. One can appreciate both points of view and look forward to further studies and accounts of this interesting period in England's history.

Like many others my first impressions of Richard III were formed by Shakespeare's play, a play written for a Tudor queen. When tackling "Wolf Hall" I realized I really had a very skewed view of the Tudors, knew very little about the Plantagenets, and nothing really about the Woodvilles. So, I turned to the historians like Kendall and authors like Brown,Weir and Higginbothan for some understanding.

I would greatly appreciate any feedback as to other good books to read on this fascinating time period.
Comment Comments (17) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 24, 2015 11:04 AM PDT


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