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20 Yard x 10" Roll - Brodart Just-a-Fold III Archival Book Jacket Covers
20 Yard x 10" Roll - Brodart Just-a-Fold III Archival Book Jacket Covers
Offered by manausbooks
Price: $17.49
2 used & new from $17.49

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, easy to use, January 16, 2011
I'd wanted to apply some Brodart covers to some old folklore books I've had for years, but never got around to it. Of course these will protect from dirt and grease, but mostly I wanted to reinforce jackets that were fragile and fraying at the edges.

These are excellent and easy to use -- instructions are included, but even if you didn't have them, if you have another dust jacket in a brodart cover you can figure out what to do. I've checked around and this is a good price as well. Great product, I plan to order more.


Shadows and Cypress: Southern Ghost Stories
Shadows and Cypress: Southern Ghost Stories
by Alan Brown
Edition: Paperback
Price: $16.43
23 used & new from $8.76

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very "scholarly" book, that may or may not be what you're looking for..., January 15, 2011
I love to read peoples accounts of local legends, ghost stories or folktales where the author doesn't give his or her own spin but merely relates the story as told. This book gives you a rare chance to do just that. "Shadows and Cypress" brings together 187 short ghost stories that the author collected with the help of his students, and from the WPA folklore collections.

People need to know, this book is different from most ghost story books written today...

Most ghost books are full of stories that have been re-written and dramatized by the author and there's usually a satisfying explanation for the haunting. Brown presents these stories exactly as they were told; "warts n' all." Here there's often no reason for a haunting, someone just relates a scary experience they had. These stories rarely obey any "rules of literature" either -- information one might expect at the beginning may be at the end of the story, however the person decides to include it. The stories can be quite short at times, a page, half-page or a mere ten lines in one case, and often the original dialect is preserved.

This is one of the most scholarly books of ghost tales you will read - there are extensive annotations with motifs noted, such as "headless ghost," "ghost with lantern," etc. There's a helpful bibliography with notes by the author about what to expect from similar books.

This isn't a book designed to scare you (although a few of the tales are creepy) this book exists primarily to preserve the storytelling tradition in the South. All of that said I can't think of a drawback with this book, except that it may not be what some people are looking for.

Other books in the oral tradition with stories that haven't been re-written are:-

-W. K. McNeil's "Ghost Stories from the American South"
-Alan Brown's "The Face in the Window and Other Alabama Ghostlore"
-Ray Browne's "A Night with the Hants"
-William Montell's "Ghosts across Kentucky" and "Haunted Houses and Family Ghosts of Kentucky"


Coffin Hollow and Other Ghost Tales
Coffin Hollow and Other Ghost Tales
by Ruth Musick
Edition: Paperback
Price: $18.20
39 used & new from $0.01

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A good collection from Musick, not as great as "The Tell-Tale Lilac Bush", December 16, 2010
Musick's Coffin Hollow is a collection of 96 ghost tales (mostly from West Virginia), and it has a feel much like her better-known collection "The Tell-Tale Lilac Bush." However "Coffin Hollow" doesn't expressly group tales into particular types as that book does, but as you read them you can tell they're grouped loosely into different themes -- headless ghosts, Civil War ghosts, vengeful ghosts, ghostly hitch-hikers, etc.

The stories are entertaining, but they're not meant to scare, nor are they often describing places where people can go "ghost hunt" -- this is a book primarily for those interested in folklore and folktales. For example, there are 11 "ghostly hitch-hiker" stories here that are all fairly similar, and some of the revenge tales tend to run together -- so this is for people with an interest in reading variations on somewhat similar themes.

That said, some of the stories here are really interesting and original. For example, #56 about a man lynched on an apple tree, later the fruit from the tree poisons and kills his lynchers. #57 where a peddler is murdered in a house and vows to kill any future owners. A couple buy the house and a burlap bag falls down the stairs -- the same kind the peddler's body was hidden in -- neighbors later discover three burlap bags on the porch of the house, and you can guess what was in them! #34 about a vicious father who chained his children in a cave to die, which was then haunted by their screams. The legend was that if a barren woman found the cave and released their spirits she would be able to have children, and of course one does.

So there's plenty of typical, formula-type ghost stories here and it's interesting to read variations on themes, but it's little oddities like those I mention above that spark my interest and make me keep researching folklore. The illustrations are evocative of the region; there's a source and motif-type index and short bibliography included too. Overall a pretty good book, although I think the quality of the stories was a little better in her previous volume. Here there's too many that can blend together, especially toward the end of the volume. But still I think it's very important for these tales to be preserved regardless.


Raising Hell: A Concise History of the Black Arts - and Those Who Dared to Practice Them
Raising Hell: A Concise History of the Black Arts - and Those Who Dared to Practice Them
by Robert Masello
Edition: Paperback
34 used & new from $1.63

4.0 out of 5 stars A good introduction with some drawbacks, December 9, 2010
Overall this is a good book for beginners on the topic of the occult. I would definitely suggest this book ONLY for those who know very little on the topic and want a good overview. The first two parts (90~ pages) on black magic and necromancy were by far the most interesting. I found the information on various grimoires to be particularly informative, and the parts on necromancy were interesting just for their weirdness alone.

The later chapters on mystical orders and especially the last two sections on alchemy and divination weren't as impressive in my opinion. I thought Masello focused a bit too much on the lives of particular people in these sections, which included interesting tidbits about their lives, but too often I felt like I was getting lost in strange stories instead of details of their craft, which I found I retained more of. However the rather extensive discussion of palm reading and tarot cards in these chapters were interesting for someone who knows little about it.

Although the author is trying to merge the art with the people who practiced it, I found the most helpful parts of this book not to be those about particular people, but about the black art itself.


The Witch Book: The Encyclopedia of Witchcraft, Wicca, and Neo-paganism
The Witch Book: The Encyclopedia of Witchcraft, Wicca, and Neo-paganism
by Raymond Buckland
Edition: Paperback
Price: $19.95
123 used & new from $0.93

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not the best witchcraft encyclopedia, November 30, 2010
I've got a few other "witchcraft encyclopedias," but I can't help comparing this one to Guiley's excellent "Encyclopedia of Witches, Witchcraft and Wicca."

Both of them cover many of the same topics, but whereas that book goes into much detail, this one only gives a brief skim of them. It also gives too much focus for my taste to personalities in the witchcraft community today. I know Buckland is well-respected in this field, but I can't recommend this book unless it's going to someone who really needs a high, overview of the subject. There's too many better titles that are just as easy to digest while having a lot more rich detail. For those who aren't looking for an introduction I would recommend Guiley's book or Robbin's "The Encyclopedia of Witchcraft and Encyclopedia."


The Encyclopedia of Witches, Witchcraft and Wicca
The Encyclopedia of Witches, Witchcraft and Wicca
by Rosemary Ellen Guiley
Edition: Paperback
Price: $18.00
45 used & new from $9.53

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent, detailed witchcraft encyclopedia..., November 30, 2010
I've got a few other encyclopedias like this one -- "The Witch Book" by Buckland, "An Encyclopedia of Occultism" by Spence, and "The Encyclopedia of Witchcraft and Demonology" by Robbins. All of these are great to decent books on the topic, but this is probably my favorite.

I've found that too many books on this topic either focus obsessively on witch trials, prominent names in the witchcraft community or they're what I can only vaguely term "new age wishy-washy." Guiley isn't guilty of any of these, she really gives a traditional view of the beliefs and old-time superstitions about witches and witchcraft. This is NOT a how-to book. That being said, she does leave room for some big names and covers many of the trials in detail -- which are pretty interesting. Plenty of illustrations fill the book and following each section she gives a brief bibliography where more information can be found.


100 Wild Little Weird Tales
100 Wild Little Weird Tales
by Stefan R., edited by DZIEMIANOWICZ
Edition: Hardcover
54 used & new from $0.01

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A good anthology of short-short weird fiction, October 25, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
There's several anthologies of stories from the Weird Tales magazine during it's "golden age," but I admit I bought this one used because it was cheap and seemed like a good way to dip my toe into the genre.

Some of the stories fall flat, but they're all deliciously pulp-ish and many of them are quite good. Coming in at around 580 pages you can figure on the stories being pretty brief, which makes this book great for when you don't have a lot of time or for when you're in more of a "browsing mood." I can see myself moving on to other anthologies with longer stories, but this is a pretty good collection to start with if you love horror fiction but aren't too familiar with Weird Tales.


Rough Weather Makes Good Timber: Carolinians Recall
Rough Weather Makes Good Timber: Carolinians Recall
by Patsy Moore Ginns
Edition: Hardcover
43 used & new from $1.75

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A neat little oral history book, October 17, 2010
I found this book at a library book sale for a dollar and decided to give it a chance. I'm glad I did. The way the text is arranged, at first I thought it was a book of recollections mixed with poetry, but it isn't, some of the recollections are only formatted like poetry. Essentially it's North Carolinian's speaking about various topics of how they use to live. It's a little like the Foxfire books in what it covers. There's chapters on Happy Times, Hard Times, Work, Social Customs, Stories and Legends, etc. Everything from recollections of corn shuckings, moonshining, making shoes to how to cook bear. This isn't a "how-to" book as much as the Foxfire books are, but then I don't read those to necessarily LEARN how to do things, so much as see how people lived. I'd recommend this book to people who enjoy the Foxfire series or southern folklore more generally.


Wieland; or the Transformation and Memoirs of Carwin, The Biloquist (Oxford World's Classics)
Wieland; or the Transformation and Memoirs of Carwin, The Biloquist (Oxford World's Classics)
by Charles Brockden Brown
Edition: Paperback
Price: $11.95
66 used & new from $5.14

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A challenge worth taking on...., October 14, 2010
First, let me say that this is not the type of thing I tend to read. I've read reviews of this book by people who were assigned this text for a class -- and they hated or did not finish it because it's written in a somewhat old and advanced type of prose. I was actually surprised how much I enjoyed it once I kept reading and got into it.

As a work of horror fiction, it does have some genuinely creepy moments here and there, and plenty of suspense, but to me at least, it satisfies much more as a kind of "cozy" rural mystery. There's also some romance thrown in toward the middle. "Wieland" does grab you eventually, and it has a thick atmosphere of Gothic doom over the characters, but from a source that stays well-hidden until the end.

I have to agree with the prime criticisms thrown at this book; that the explanations given for the events were essentially too far flung, too amazing to be believed. I would also say that more of a tie should have been made between the prelude about the father and the later events that happen to his son and daughter. I would recommend this book only to those who are truly committed to reading older Gothic tales, or what some consider "America's earliest novel."


The Ghosts of Virginia
The Ghosts of Virginia
by L. B. Taylor
Edition: Paperback
85 used & new from $0.01

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This 13 volume collection the most extensive ghost-lore collection from one state?, July 10, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The Ghosts of Virginia (Paperback)
The "Ghosts of Virginia" series has 13 volumes, each with around 400~ pages -- a 15-year "project" published from 1993-2008. That has to make this series the most extensive collection of ghost-lore ever brought together for any one state. In fact, it's probably the most extensive collection of folklore in general for any one state. The only folklore collection I know that comes close is Henry Hyatt's 5 volume, 5,000~ page "Hoodoo" books, and they don't cover a state but a region, the South. I have all 13 of them and as someone who has collected folklore since I was young, I consider it one of the best, and most fun collections I've ever come across.

These books are a browser's dream, chapters cover a specific ghost/place/event and they're often kept fairly short and to-the-point; no over-dramatization and atmospherics yet they're well-written, full of oral accounts and tidbits of local lore. They're typically about the grand old houses of Virginia, but will often concern isolated sections of the countryside where battles or various tragedies have occurred over the centuries. You really never know where he might take you next, there's haunted houses, rocking chairs, even a haunted sawmill blade! Taylor has culled much information from old books and newspapers, which I often find as interesting as the oral narratives. Short as the chapters are they're stuffed with information. Throughout the volumes he has chapters that will focus on a particular topic like witch legends, ghost dogs, etc with multiple stories that are typically a page or less in length. He tends to show a preference for tales a century or more old.

It feels like a very knowledgeable person has taken you by the hand and is leading you on a tour of haunted Virginia, speaking directly to the people who claim to have experienced them. There's a lot of black and white pictures of the places he's speaking of which is helpful, and there's folksy ink illustrations as well. These don't feel like "ghost hunter" books where someone is trying to convince you of the veracity of ghosts based on the author's own experiences or pseudoscience, thankfully.

To some peoples chagrin he does occasionally focus more on the history and merely cap the tale with something like "and some say his ghost still walks the halls..." But this isn't the norm by any means, as it is too often with other ghost books. These are still interesting for the local lore, although not always for the ghost. If I had one complaint about the series, it would be the binding of the books isn't the best -- the glue is very rigid, more apt to crack than bend, but that's no fault of the author's. It would be nice if there was an index for all 13 volumes made available -- there's so much material here. It's amazing that a series like this has been produced, the amount of material here, for those who are interested in ghost-lore is simply mind-boggling! Excellent reading on a porch on an October afternoon!


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