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PINHA-T038 HYUNDAI SANTE FE Factory OEM KEY FOB Keyless Entry Remote Alarm
PINHA-T038 HYUNDAI SANTE FE Factory OEM KEY FOB Keyless Entry Remote Alarm
3 used & new from $74.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mine worked as advertised and we're very happy with the money saved, February 15, 2016
Mine worked as advertised and we're very happy with the money saved. Before purchasing, you should know:

1. The key fob may not be programmable. I was given notice before asking them to program the key fob with my Santa Fe that some can only be programmed once and that there's a chance that it wouldn't work, and I would still have to pay the programming fee.

2. I couldn't find a place to program it other than the Hyundai dealership. The location I went to in Houston normally charges $125, but the service manager knocked it down to $60, so I recommend pushing for the lower price. They didn't say whether the key fob was included in the $125. You'd like to think it is, but it's the dealership, so there's a chance it is not.


Keyecu Transmitter Remote Key Fob 315MHz 2B+Panic for Hyundai Tucson Santa Fe Elantra
Keyecu Transmitter Remote Key Fob 315MHz 2B+Panic for Hyundai Tucson Santa Fe Elantra
Offered by keyecu
Price: $65.89
2 used & new from $25.49

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Worked great, but take note!, February 15, 2016
Before deciding to purchase the key fob, you should know:

1. The key fob may not be programmable. I was given notice before asking them to program the key fob with my Santa Fe that some can only be programmed once and that there's a chance that it wouldn't work, and I would still have to pay the programming fee. Fortunately the one I received worked!

2. I couldn't find a place to program it other than the Hyundai dealership. The location I went to in Houston normally charges $125, but the service manager knocked it down to $60, so I recommend pushing for the lower price. They didn't say whether the key fob was included in the $125. You'd like to think it is, but it's the dealership, so there's a chance it is not.


Lion Leads the Way
Lion Leads the Way
Price: $1.29

5.0 out of 5 stars Easily in Pillar's top three songs ever, January 13, 2016
This review is from: Lion Leads the Way (MP3 Music)
If someone asked for the top three songs by Pillar, this would be on that list. If you haven't listened to or purchased One Love Revolution, do yourself a favor and get it.


Lion Leads The Way
Lion Leads The Way
Price: $0.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Easily in Pillar's top three songs ever, January 12, 2016
This review is from: Lion Leads The Way (MP3 Music)
If someone asked for the top three songs by Pillar, this would be on that list. If you haven't listened to or purchased One Love Revolution, do yourself a favor and get it.


Outcast (Star Force Series Book 10)
Outcast (Star Force Series Book 10)
Price: $5.99

14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Nice addition, but we've seen this guy before, right?, May 20, 2014
If you've enjoyed Larson's previous nine Star Force novels, then you should find a certain level of satisfaction with this latest installment. Outcast is a decent addition to the Star Force universe and handled well for series newcomer David VanDyke. While there are a few spots that could use trimming and I have several small gripes, the story moves at a decent pace and kept me mostly entertained.

I've never read any of VanDyke's works, but he does a great job handling the story, to the point where I am unable to tell who is writing. There are multiples uses of AU (astronomical unit), and to my best recollection, Larson has rarely, if ever, used this term. Other than that, the lines are blurred on the writing style, which is a big plus as it makes the reading experience very cohesive. Larson's prose in previous Star Force makes reading them a breeze, and Outcast is no exception.

My biggest gripe is that Cody is written as a virtual clone of his dad, Kyle. Everything about him screams Kyle Riggs and there's really no distinction between the two. Reactions, decisions, impulses, bravado, it's all just like his old man. The book spans several months and at no point did Cody exhibit anything different during the numerous lulls, obstacles, and struggles, both physical and emotional. Given the continuous, never-ending struggle of survival for the crew on Valiant and the ample opportunities to show a different character, it's hard to believe that future books will see Cody break out of the mold of Kyle Riggs.

Outcast takes place 20 years after The Dead Sun, so is Sergeant Major Kwon really still a bored, active marine who happens to be right in the thick of a science experiment gone wrong? There's Marvin, the source of much frustration (for the characters) and entertainment/intrigue (for us readers), who also happens to hitch a ride when Cody leaves Earth. Then there's the standard Riggs luck that Kyle has exhibited throughout the years going strong with Cody. We've seen this many times before, but now they're effectively stranded in space.

Each of these items accumulated to a read that started fun, then continued into something we've ultimately seen before, even with the new threat being vastly different than anything before it. Outcast is by no means a bad book, and not even close to the worst in the series, but I couldn't help but feel that we've gotten more of the same, with a few exceptions along the way. Two new races are discovered, a threat more devastating than the Macros is introduced and the book ends with a bit more intrigue. There's still plenty of potential for fun, and I'm still as eager as ever to see where it goes. 3.5 out of 5 stars.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Dec 22, 2014 6:34 AM PST


Release The Panic: Recalibrated
Release The Panic: Recalibrated
Price: $6.99

7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Does the remix fix an underwhelming release? An honest review., April 29, 2014
Red's Release The Panic was a let down compared to their previous albums. Understandably, they wanted to try new things. Unfortunately, it did not resonate well. The style of music was different from what we've come to know and love, and opinions on each song is a mixed bag. Nearly every song is written by the three core members, and the lyrics are solid throughout, but the music itself is where RTP suffered. If We Only is generally considered the best track on the album, which is no surprise as it's virtually the only one that retains Red's unique complimentary blend of strings and effects. Enter Release The Panic: Recalibrated, a remix album attempting to appease us fans that wanted songs more like If We Only, where Red's distinct music and vocals are on full display.

Run And Escape - Going back to its roots, Red delivers the best track on this album. It's a great addition to their fantastic resume, so what else is there to say?

Release the Panic - This is, at best, my second favorite song from last year's RTP, so I felt any adjustments weren't necessary from the get go. It was heavy, didn't have strings, but it still rocked and I was happy. What we have is the same song from RTP with an added layer of strings for the sake of strings, which are too loud and unnecessary.

Damage - Like Release the Panic, it's the same track with an added layer of strings, and way too much at that. I like the original Damage, and this iteration is far too busy and conflicting when the strings are included. The strings do not sound like those in Run And Escape and like the title track, are too loud and unnecessary.

Hold Me Now - Another bright spot from the original RTP, this song is mostly unchanged with an added layer of strings, but this time, it actually works! The strings still don't sound like those in Run and Escape, but they blend naturally and don't stand out. Strings or no strings, I would go with either version.

So Far Away - A song with a great message, though I consider it an average one at best. Same goes with this newer version, though the strings add more depth and mostly compliment it. There are a few times where the strings were a bit too strong, as if vying to be heard over the rest of the music, but ultimately this is what the song should have been in the first place.

Glass House - Didn't really care for the original, and though the strings do mostly improve the song, I still don't care for it. The biggest turn off has always been the drum track, whereas the rest of the music did not stand out. Former Red drummer Joe Rickard has a great style on display in Until We Have Faces and RTP, making Glass House's drums uninspiring and disappointing.

As You Go - This track seems to have undergone the most changes of all Recalibrated songs, but I'm iffy on both versions of this song as there are things about both that I'm not a fan of.

Release The Panic: Recalibrated does not make up for its predecessor's underwhelming delivery. Realistically, Run and Escape may be the only track I will continuously play moving forward. While that is disappointing, the new track gives me hope that greater things are on the horizon for Red's next full album, even more so since they're going to work with Rob Graves, the producer for their first three albums. If RTP was a failed experiment, where does that leave RTP: Recalibrated? A decent rebuttal? A passable fix? A vindicating correction? I have to be honest here. I wouldn't call this release a failure, though I find it is close to one. Red is an amazing band, probably my absolute favorite, but even the best of the best have off days. Hold Me Now gets a boost and Run and Escape brings a breath of fresh air and hope, but that's not enough to carry the rest.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 29, 2014 7:24 PM PDT


Shazam! Vol. 1 (The New 52)
Shazam! Vol. 1 (The New 52)
by Geoff Johns
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $17.00
103 used & new from $12.40

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Oh, this is sweet." "Freddy was right. This is sweet.", January 10, 2014
Geoff Johns, how you entertain me so. I knew only a tiny bit about Shazam, but that doesn't matter. What we have here is Johns, and Gary Frank, delivering a fantastically fun, beautifully illustrated origin story of one of my new favorite characters. It has a rich story with loads of mythology that's just waiting to be explored further. The artwork is top notch and downright gorgeous at times. It's so good that you'd run out of wall space with the number of posters that this volume could produce. Fans of Geoff Johns or DC Comics are sure to enjoy this thoroughly entertaining volume. Seriously, read this. You will not be sorry.


We As Human
We As Human
Offered by Global Overstock
Price: $7.70
69 used & new from $1.29

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great debut album that has me ready for more, June 25, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: We As Human (Audio CD)
I am a big fan and supporter of We As Human. I discovered them in early 2011 on Pandora and started searching them out, only to discover the only music readily available was their Burning Satellites EP, which is no longer available here or other stores (look it up on YouTube). I enjoyed everything I heard, and then they came out with We As Human EP, which I could not get enough of. Strong vocals, great rhythms, I believed that this was a band that needed more exposure and a chance to make a full length album*. Well, now they have it! When a band I like releases a new album, I usually approach it with some trepidation, because what if I don't like it? What if they go in a direction that just doesn't work? I discovered Red around the same time as We As Human and became immersed in their first three albums. Then Release The Panic came out. Truth be told, it was a bit of a let down as many of their songs deviated from what many of us grew to enjoy and love, and though I have grown to enjoy it for what it is, I still favor their previous works. So does We As Human's self titled debut match up to their two previous EP's? Mostly, and strongly.

The album leads off with their first previewed track, Strike Back, a lyrically simple, yet solidly strong song that I love to crank up and repeat. Next up is Dead Man, the band's third iteration of the song. Like the previous two versions, it does not disappoint and is still a fantastic song. I honestly do not know which one I like more because they all sound great. Bring To Life is where the album takes a small misstep, but it's not that bad of a song; it may grow on me over time. Let Me Drown definitely misses the mark and was my first disliked track. Zombie and We Fall Apart are both great songs that WAH can be proud of. Take the Bullets Away is a powerful song, but Lacey Sturm's contribution on the first verse is iffy. However, her vocals in the chorus are phenomenal. Taking Life is more of a mainstream track and sounds nothing like what I have come to know as WAH, making it my most disliked song on the album. Sever, one of my most beloved WAH songs, comes with a slightly different sound than on the EP. Once I reached the chorus, I realized that the strong, deep tone from the first version has been replaced with a slightly higher pitched version that takes away from an otherwise amazing song. I definitely prefer the EP version, but some may like the change. Last but not least is I Stand. This one is both a hit and a miss for me. While it is a great song, the original lyrics have changed from what many of us have come to know and sing. Gone are direct mentions of God and Jesus, and the dissing of evolution, instead we have mentions to the One, He and Your and no mention of evolution at all. I always felt the two evolution lines were silly to include, but replacing God and Jesus was a little disappointing.

That's my review and I'm sticking to it. As their first true debut album, this a great start and I am looking forward to more. While I did get a free copy for supporting their Kickstarter campaign, I am furthering my support by buying another copy to give to a friend. Rock on We As Human, I will continue to support your growth. Should you guys run another fundraiser, consider me ready to help.

Some additional info for anyone that cares. I got a chance to speak with Justin Cordle, the lead singer, while they were touring in Houston with Red. If the album sells enough, a deluxe edition will be released that contains (I believe) three more tracks, but I did not get a time frame on when that could happen. Deluxe editions are becoming a growing trend, much to my chagrin (booo, hisss, just release them all!). Concerning Dead Man, Cordle said that some of the guys liked the Burning Satellites EP version, while others enjoyed the We As Human EP version, so they decided to work on a third version that kind of meshed the two. For Sever, they could not use the EP version since it was recorded in a different studio, but he said it was pretty much the same song. What he failed to mentioned was the higher tone in the chorus, which I am no fan of. Cordle has strong vocals and the new version kind of takes away from it. At the concert, they played the EP versions of Dead Man and Sever, and used the original lyrics for I Stand.

* Side note: technically they released a full length album in 2006, titled Until We're Dead. It lacks the polish and quality of their more recent work and could go through the rewrite treatment that Dead Man has gone through. This album, We As Human, is their first major studio release.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 18, 2013 9:04 PM PDT


Batman Vol. 2: The City of Owls (Batman Graphic Novel)
Batman Vol. 2: The City of Owls (Batman Graphic Novel)
Price: $8.99

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great conclusion for the Court of Owls, March 26, 2013
The City of Owls is another fantastic volume for Batman fans. It continues right where Batman Vol. 1: The Court of Owls (The New 52) left off, sucking you into a compelling story with artwork that fits greatly with the narrative. It is a fun ride that ends up feeling cut short by being resolved by issue #11. Issue #12 gives a proper introduction to Harper Row, the seemingly random character that saved Batman's life in issue #7. Given her level of involvement thus far, it's probably a safe bet that we will see more of her, not only popping up when convenient, but likely joining Batman in an Oracle-esque role, if not becoming a new Oracle. Like issue #12, the Annual issue is a stand alone issue, giving us an enjoyable story of Victor Fries, who has always been one of my favorite Batman villains.

So if this is such a great read, why four stars? In another review, Anarchy in the US nailed it when he likened the Talons to bullies. They get chatty and lose some of the allure and mystique that Court of Owls provided. Another squabble that I have concerns a certain revelation. Not the revelation itself, but the person behind it. If the Talons were chatty, then this person would talk your ear off. Another issue was abrupt change of pace between issues #11, #12 and the Annual. There's a case to be made with the inclusion of issue #12. Not only does it come after the conclusion to the Court of Owls arc, but it also provides clarity on Row's brief appearance in #7, so it ends up being a useful and beneficial tie-in. Personally, I read the Annual after I finished the rest of the novel, but not doing so will probably throw readers off if read in the order this novel provides.

Scott Snyder has done some engaging story telling with The City of Owls and it is another great collection that's sure to please. I have it at 4 stars, but it's a solid 4.5 rating. The Court of Owls are broken, but they are not gone, and I look forward to their inevitable return with glee.


Earth 2 Vol. 1: The Gathering (The New 52)
Earth 2 Vol. 1: The Gathering (The New 52)
by James Dale Robinson
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $17.47
90 used & new from $7.35

16 of 25 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great artwork, so-so story, misleading cover art, March 21, 2013
If you were like me, you probably saw the cover and thought, "Sweet! A series about Earth 2's Batman, Superman and Wonder Woman!", while also neglecting to read the product's description. And if you had a similar thought, you were probably disappointed to have the trio around for only the first issue as the story focuses on other characters. Again, this is having neglected reading anything about the series. So who is this really about? Green Lantern (Alan Scott), The Flash (a young Jay Garrick), Hawkgirl and the Atom.

Our new heroes reluctantly come together to fight a life sucking force, Grundy, who seems to be the yang to Green Lantern's yin. You see, Scott has been chosen to be Earth's champion, Green Lantern, from the embodiment of the earth's energy, and because there is a new champion, Grundy must rise in the name of the Grey. Sounds iffy, right? I am relatively new to comic books, but I know Scott was not a true Green Lantern, as his ring was made of magic, not Will. This seems like a big departure, though it is not necessarily a bad thing. Before Grundy is awoken, Garrick inherits the Roman god Mercury's power of speed and shortly comes across Hawkgirl, who knew Garrick would be there at that moment. I know less about Garrick gaining powers than Scott, but the tie-in of Mercury with Garrick and in the first issue with Wonder Woman was a decent setup. Very little is revealed of the Atom, even less of Hawkgirl, and Mister Terrific makes a quick cameo appearance before being captured.

The artwork is great, the cover is terribly misleading, and the story leaves much to be desired. It was not bad, but it was not necessarily good either. I plan continue to read this series and hope it improves like the Red Lantern series has, but the disappointment of having none of the big players is somewhat off putting. The most intriguing part of this series is Sloan, so there may be hope yet.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 22, 2013 8:11 PM PDT


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