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(13 Pack) MagicFiber® Premium Microfiber Cleaning Cloths - For Tablet, Cell Phone, Laptop, LCD TV Screens and Any Other Delicate Surface (12 Black, 1 Grey)
(13 Pack) MagicFiber® Premium Microfiber Cleaning Cloths - For Tablet, Cell Phone, Laptop, LCD TV Screens and Any Other Delicate Surface (12 Black, 1 Grey)
Offered by Digital Goja
Price: $17.99
5 used & new from $12.72

5.0 out of 5 stars Soft fleecy assortment with uses galore, September 30, 2014
Items arrived on time and in condition promised. Very useful to glass wearers or obsessive cleaners of touch screen devices. If you're feeling insecure, take one to bed with you and cuddle. A must-have item suitable for all ages.


In Search of Adam and Eve
In Search of Adam and Eve
Price: $6.95

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A masterful examination of science and religion, March 4, 2012
What would happen if the Catholic church and Christianity in general were to abandon a literal view of Adam and Eve, Original Justice and The Fall, and reexamine these beliefs in light of modern scientific knowledge? In the view of William G. Joseph, priest and scientist, the Garden of Eden myth would be replaced with a better story in which theologians arrive at deeper, more meaningful conclusions about redemption by Christ, humanity's relationship with God, and the eternal life of the soul.

Using the Genesis myth to launch his riveting discussion, Joseph takes us on an historical tour of evolving explanations of the natural world, beginning with the Greeks, through Copernicus and Galileo, to Isaac Newton, Charles Darwin, Heisenberg, and Einstein. Since the Enlightenment, there is no turning back from a scientific method which demands testable theories and consistent experiment results. The modern physical world is understood as a vastly different place than depicted in Genesis.

For Joseph, this is a good thing. Rather than shake religious faith, he believes science can inform theology, and Christian theology can only gain credibility from scientific knowledge. When theologians write of moral or ethical issues, the foundation should not be a metaphorical image from a four thousand year old text, but based on what scientists today know to be true about the physical world. Theologians ought to employ the same scientific method used by biologists, physicists, and chemists: hypothesizing, testing, subjecting writings to peer review, revision, and acceptance that conclusions are never final, even though they may be the best that current thinking can construct.

Joseph suggests areas where this new theological inquiry might lead: investigation of the soul, what a mature relationship with God means, how genes may influence free will, original sin and how we might understand Original Justice and the Fall in light of evolution. In all its inquiry though, theology in the 21st century must reflect the principle of a learning church, never absolutely certain, whose knowledge of an infinite God will always be incomplete.

Joseph is not an academic theologian, but calls on creative professionals to do for theology what scientists have done for understanding the natural world. Joseph brings great nuance, imagination, wit, style, and breadth of knowledge to an under-explored subject. It is hoped that theologians, lay persons, and scientists will read In Search of Adam and Eve. It's a valuable book to get an important conversation started.


In Search of Adam and Eve: A case for a theology of evolution
In Search of Adam and Eve: A case for a theology of evolution
by William G. Joseph
Edition: Paperback
Price: $8.96
6 used & new from $4.04

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A masterful examination of science and religion, March 4, 2012
What would happen if the Catholic church and Christianity in general were to abandon a literal view of Adam and Eve, Original Justice and The Fall, and reexamine these beliefs in light of modern scientific knowledge? In the view of William G. Joseph, priest and scientist, the Garden of Eden myth would be replaced with a better story in which theologians arrive at deeper, more meaningful conclusions about redemption by Christ, humanity's relationship with God, and the eternal life of the soul.

Using the Genesis myth to launch his riveting discussion, Joseph takes us on an historical tour of evolving explanations of the natural world, beginning with the Greeks, through Copernicus and Galileo, to Isaac Newton, Charles Darwin, Heisenberg, and Einstein. Since the Enlightenment, there is no turning back from a scientific method which demands testable theories and consistent experiment results. The modern physical world is understood as a vastly different place than depicted in Genesis.

For Joseph, this is a good thing. Rather than shake religious faith, he believes science can inform theology, and Christian theology can only gain credibility from scientific knowledge. When theologians write of moral or ethical issues, the foundation should not be a metaphorical image from a four thousand year old text, but based on what scientists today know to be true about the physical world. Theologians ought to employ the same scientific method used by biologists, physicists, and chemists: hypothesizing, testing, subjecting writings to peer review, revision, and acceptance that conclusions are never final, even though they may be the best that current thinking can construct.

Joseph suggests areas where this new theological inquiry might lead: investigation of the soul, what a mature relationship with God means, how genes may influence free will, original sin and how we might understand Original Justice and the Fall in light of evolution. In all its inquiry though, theology in the 21st century must reflect the principle of a learning church, never absolutely certain, whose knowledge of an infinite God will always be incomplete.

Joseph is not an academic theologian, but calls on creative professionals to do for theology what scientists have done for understanding the natural world. Joseph brings great nuance, imagination, wit, style, and breadth of knowledge to an under-explored subject. It is hoped that theologians, lay persons, and scientists will read In Search of Adam and Eve. It's a valuable book to get an important conversation started.


The Church
The Church
Offered by HarperCollins Publishers
Price: $11.04

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One Star for Kindle Version: No text link to endnotes, October 27, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The Church (Kindle Edition)
This book is everything we've come to expect from Richard McBrien, detailed scholarship, meticulous analysis, elegant writing, and a compelling story. Read any of the fine reviews to learn more about the range of topics addressed in this book. Five stars for the text.

Regarding the Kindle edition which I purchased, I was very disappointed that the endnotes are not linked to the text. Authors like McBrien should be aware that Kindle versions are sadly inferior to the print edition if notes cannot be easily accessed. I suspect many read Father McBrien's works not just for the main text, but also for the informative notes. The Kindle is supposed to make reading more convenient, not more complicated. One star for the Kindle version.


Garden Bulbs for the South
Garden Bulbs for the South
by Scott Ogden
Edition: Hardcover
23 used & new from $32.83

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This review refers to the Second Edition, February 22, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Scott Ogden has written the only book I'm aware of that's specific to the Southern garden. He takes a season by season approach, explaining in some detail what bulbs bloom and thrive in the South, and also which to avoid. Since many nurseries offer bulbs not appropriate to the climate I live in, if Ogden hasn't approved the species, I don't buy it. Ogden usually suggests alternatives to the plant that would work in the South, and this is invaluable for the Southern gardener. Within the southern region, he also distinguishes between upper South, middle South, and Gulf Coast climates, giving further direction regarding the fitness of a particular bulb to your part of the South.

There are some curious omissions in Ogden's book. He doesn't mention Chionodoxa, Scilla siberica, Eranthis, Fritillaria, or Pushkinia, all commonly cited in gardening books. Since the book is organized by bloom seasons, I would like to have seen a list of plants being covered at the start of each chapter. And it also would have been useful to create an appendix table noting which bulbs would not succeed in the South, and which ones might grow only if dug up and stored each winter.

Those are minor negatives though (and perhaps will be incorporated into a third edition) and in no way diminish the great value of this book. If you are a gardener in the southern U.S. and are interested in bulbs, you cannot be without "Garden Bulbs for the South."


Flowering Shrubs and Small Trees for the South
Flowering Shrubs and Small Trees for the South
by Marie Harrison
Edition: Paperback
Price: $14.13
48 used & new from $1.91

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A concise guide to flowering understory plants, January 24, 2010
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This small book offers a useful guide to flowering understory plants for gardeners interested in developing gardens that go beyond staid suburban foundation plantings and sun beds. Accompanied by numerous color photos and providing much descriptive and cultural information on each page (as well as size, salt tolerance, hardiness zone, propagation), Harrison's book is a handy and concise reference.

Chapters 1 and 2 focus on flowering trees and shrubs, chapter 3 deals with herbaceous plants, and chapter 4 offers additional flowering trees and shrubs but with line drawings rather than colored photos. The book may be most helpful to gardeners in USDA hardiness zones 5-9; only about 10 of the approximately 100 trees and shrubs would not be suited to that range. Conversely, nearly all of chapter 3's herbaceous plants are best sited in zones 8 or 9-11, and probably would not perform well over most of the southeast.

A real plus to this book are the photos showing the habit of each plant, rather than merely a close-up of the bloom. Typically, each page includes both a magnified photo of the flower or foliage, as well as a top to bottom shot of the entire plant. This is very useful, as many flowering plants can grow either as suckering shrubs or as small trees, and it may not always be clear from the description which form may emerge.

As a specialty guide to understory plantings, I would recommend Marie Harrison's "Flowering Shrubs and Small Trees for the South."


The Shade Garden: Shade-Loving Plants for Year-Round Interest
The Shade Garden: Shade-Loving Plants for Year-Round Interest
by Beth Chatto
Edition: Paperback
27 used & new from $11.93

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The quintessential shade garden book, January 24, 2010
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Previously released in 2002 as The Woodland Garden, this reissue is an elegant, photo-filled journal of Beth Chatto's famous Essex shade garden. The book is a beautifully written reflection on the cycle of the seasons in a garden Chatto has designed and developed over the course of 20-odd years. It is the quintessential woodland garden book, reflecting a particularly British conceit not often found in American garden design. If you are looking for a book on British cottage gardening, this is not the book, nor is it a book on the nuts and bolts of garden design. Rather, it is an ofttimes poetic narrative on shade gardening within nature, liberally sprinkled with Chatto's wit and practical observations on what a woodland garden can be, that very tricky combination of "natural" elements supplemented by all manner of groundcovers, understory trees and shrubs, vines, bulbs, perennials, ferns, grasses--any variation (native or not) that can work in harmony with Nature's canvas and provide year-round visual interest.

Seven chapters take the reader from the origin of the garden in 1987 (when a hurricane destroyed part of the Chatto land that had been left in a natural state) and on through the four seasons. Chatto describes the floral highlights of each season, and the accompanying photos vividly complement her engaging text. The final chapter of the book lists many of the plants Chatto used in her garden, some of them with wonderful photos. US readers should note that Chatto gardens in the UK, and some of her plants are not readily available in the US. But Chatto will inspire the motivated to find native substitutes for her European plantings. "Right plant, right place" is after all her saying.

There are other books that treat the same subject: Larry Hodgson's "Making the Most of Shade," Ken Druse's "The Natural Shade Garden," and Keith Wiley's "Shade: Ideas and Inspiration for Shade Gardens," to name a few I've read; any of those could be recommended to gardeners interested in learning more about shade/woodland gardening. Read Chatto's book first though, and you'll definitely get more from the others. There is no better book on woodland gardening that I have read than Beth Chatto's "The Shade Garden."


The Great Waldo Pepper
The Great Waldo Pepper
DVD ~ Robert Redford
46 used & new from $1.07

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Great Waldo Pepper, March 15, 2002
This review is from: The Great Waldo Pepper (DVD)
This is a moving tale of a daredevil hero ace from aviation's early days who can't accept changes in the field during the post-War period. Beyond that, Redford's Waldo Pepper is a tragic hero of mythic proportions, determined to fly too close to the sun. The bi-plane sequences are breathtaking, and George Roy Hill's direction is what you'd expect from the maker of "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" and "The Sting." Unfortunately, Goodtimes Video's policy is to release films "enhanced to fit your TV screen" and the power of this film's visual majesty is severely diminished. It's another case of a distributor who just doesn't get it. (Memo to Goodtimes Video: America has big screen TVs now.)


Excellent Catholic Parishes: The Guide to Best Places and Practices
Excellent Catholic Parishes: The Guide to Best Places and Practices
by Paul Wilkes
Edition: Paperback
Price: $15.26
85 used & new from $0.01

46 of 56 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Excellent parishes are flawed jewels, October 26, 2001
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Mr. Wilkes offers an inspiring overview of "excellent" Catholic parishes, but the nuts and bolts of running an "excellent" parish are ignored. This is not a "how-to" book as much as a presentation of church communities too good to be true.

In fact, I have been to three of these "excellent" parishes and can assure you that they are simply hyped parishes who at one time or another had a charismatic pastor. They are the flavor of the month, and in a few years will look as faddishly ridiculous as afros or SUVs.

St. Mary Magdalen in Florida, where I grew up, is now a parish ruled by a "lay-ocracy" of parishioners, typically wealthy, who push through their own programs at the expense of less influential members. They recently raised money to renovate their 25 year old chuch, but wealthy members convinced a weak pastor to spend the money on a gymnasium instead. A product of central Florida's explosive growth, they will be saddled with brick-and-mortar monuments in years to come.

Old St. Pat's in Chicago prides itself on a celebration of diversity and ecumenism. One Holy Week, the pastor and his parishioner confidantes decided to cancel the Holy Thursday liturgy in favor of a Seder--limited seating (100 people) at $20 a head. Most parishioners were excluded from a celebration of one of Catholicism's most solemn liturgies. Fortunately, Cardinal Bernardin had a proper liturgy in the cathedral not far from good old Pat's.

Santa Monica in California is a touchy, feel-good church with a dynamic pastor, lots of wealthy parishioners (then-Mayor Riordan donated $1 million to repair a bell tower damaged in an earthquake), and enough film stars in attendance to rival Spago's. In the country's largest diocese, it offers good liturgies and an involved community that is unrivaled by other Los Angeles parishes; the diocese has no commitment to liturgy, so anything rising a few inches above the ruck is bound to be considered "excellent."

Mr. Wilke would do better to look at the true nature of his parishes, which may not have been possible in his short stays. The diamond may shine on first look, but closer examination shows a dirty black core.
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