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OpenCms 7 Development: Extending and customizing OpenCms through its Java API
OpenCms 7 Development: Extending and customizing OpenCms through its Java API
by Dan Liliedahl
Edition: Paperback
Price: $44.99
30 used & new from $3.60

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The book has more than adequate coverage for beginners but is helpful to developers as well, July 28, 2008
The coverage of the book is somewhat hinted at in the Preface "OpenCms can be used by Java developers to create sophisticated add-ons and customizations that extend the power of OpenCms in virtually unlimited directions. Starting by showing how to set up a development environment for OpenCms work, this book moves you through various tasks of increasing complexity."

The book moves forward incrementally, starting right at architecture overview level, through building and thereupon onwards into extending OpenCms by developing. The Chapter on Modules is very thorough and is something that would require a re-read before becoming proficient in handling the various levels of sophistication that OpenCms provides. I would have liked a bit more detail into the Security and 'securing the site' aspects of OpenCms. Especially around Resource Permissions. However, given that by the time one reads about this aspect, the developer/reader would have covered aspects of customization, not much harm is done. The various extensions to OpenCms is covered in 3 separate chapters which is a really good thing to do.

Happily enough, the book has a small but rich section devoted to Lucene and incorporating 'search' within a site. The chapter does require a small bit of prior knowledge about Lucene, but developers who would be introduced to Lucene API for the first time would not feel hindered in any way.

The best thing about the book is that the author manages to keep it light inspite of the wide coverage demanded by the Java API related discussion. While new developers would find it handy, the seasoned ones would find the book a good reference.


Service Oriented Java Business Integration: Enterprise Service Bus integration solutions for Java developers
Service Oriented Java Business Integration: Enterprise Service Bus integration solutions for Java developers
by C. A. Binildas
Edition: Paperback
Price: $49.99
30 used & new from $11.91

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A book to keep on the shelf if you are doing Service Oriented Architecture bits, May 12, 2008
Books around SOA and associated topics are in plenty these days. A few common shortcomings in them are [1] being too abstract [2] being too light on real life models [3] assuming too deep domain specific knowledge [4] cannot decide whether to stick to the fundamentals or go really deep.

This book is somewhat of an exception. It does not pretend to be a deep dive technical exposition into SOA and especially Java Business Integration. Rather, it provides overview from a strategic architecture level by using the building blocks of JBI. Which is good because by sticking to the fundamentals it provides a solid foundation of the things to keep in mind when building stuff using Service Mix container.

Therein lies a small failure though. The strong focus on Service Mix takes the focus away from providing either an extensive overview or a small deep dive of Java Business Integration. The examples of Service Mix kind of make up for this shortcoming but a book like this should have put some focus on the "architect" vision of the framework. It is fairly obvious that the author has taken trouble to explain concepts of EAI patterns.

There is something to be said about the editorial control though. The language is tedious, which is a deviation from the standard PacktPub books. There are spelling errors and sections where the formatting does not follow the standards established before hand. It does prove a point about not trusting the spellchecker too much.

It is a good book to have at hand for a beginner in the realm of JBI and SOA. I would not recommend it strongly for a developer-architect since there are better books and the examples and UseCases would seem jaded. An addition to the book could be a wiki / blog which would serve as a live extension to the book content (which would get out of date fairly rapidly) and provide the basis of a conversation and possibly a new edition.


Linux Thin Client Networks Design and Deployment: A quick guide for System Administrators
Linux Thin Client Networks Design and Deployment: A quick guide for System Administrators
by David Richards
Edition: Paperback
Price: $39.99
44 used & new from $27.63

3.0 out of 5 stars A fairly complete overview of Linux Thin Client Deployments, March 17, 2008
David Richards has been into Linux Thin Clients for a while and his experience with designing and deploying them is evident throughout the book. The book is a bit dated though. Fedora Core 6 is an old release. However, that in no way does take away the relevance of the contents and the care with which they have been selected.

This book is a good option for the rank newcomer into the world of "thin clients" using open source tools as well as the experienced System Administrator who has been tasked to set up or design a network of thin clients. From an exhaustive overview of the important components that make up the thin client "architecture", David goes into configuration choices. What I liked about the book is that it provides pointers to trade-offs for each choice of component made and the explanations are in a language which business unit owners can relate too. Additionally, the content tries to avoid the over usage of technical jargon and that is a tough task given the subject matter.

What I did expect was a bit more insight into larger deployments and distributed deployments (say anything over 10,000 clients) and the issues that come on to the picture at that instance. Architecture changes and design modifications, including component selection that would be required for handling presentation layer bits at such large deployments. The current book does not have those details. I'd hope that Packt comes up with a newer edition to address those.


Tapestry 5: Building Web Applications: A step-by-step guide to Java Web development with the developer-friendly Apache Tapestry framework
Tapestry 5: Building Web Applications: A step-by-step guide to Java Web development with the developer-friendly Apache Tapestry framework
by Alexander Kolesnikov
Edition: Paperback
Price: $39.99
35 used & new from $0.01

4.0 out of 5 stars A good book to have on the desk for web developers planning to work with Tapestry 5, March 17, 2008
The book claims to be a step-by-step guide for those who want to build contemporary web applications. And it does stick to the objective. Without wasting too much time on discussing the what and what's new of Tapestry, the author does a quick general overview of web frameworks and existing flaws and proceeds towards explaining how Tapestry 5 fits in. He does mention fleetingly that Tapestry 5 is a complete re-write and hence not much of Tapestry 4 stuff is going to work.

Touching upon how to install, configure and get up and running with Tapestry and the related tools (Eclipse/NetBeans and Maven), the author starts off on the basics of what can be done by the 3rd chapter. Explaining the use of Tapestry in the light of the fundamental building blocks of an web application and architecture, the good thing about the book is that it puts in place the good practices to adhere to while taking the example of a standard web application. Liberal use of reference URLs, notes and things to watch out for also make it possible for the developer to be aware of the various gotchas that can become part of an application code. The chapter on i18n and l10n would be of special interest to developers who desire to globalize their applications.

The layout of the book is nice. Enough care is given to ensure that there is margin space for notes and the font selection does seem to work well on the eye. The author has taken a lot of care on the Appendices as well. A fact that most books seem to neglect.

If a web developer with existing knowledge of programming in Java and frameworks wishes to come up to speed with Tapestry 5, this would be a good book to have at hand and keep well-thumbed. It does have a lot of programming insights all of which may not be obvious at the first read, but would come of use with continuous development with Tapestry 5.


The Google Story
The Google Story
by David A. Vise
Edition: Hardcover
127 used & new from $0.01

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Easy to read - light on insights, December 12, 2005
This review is from: The Google Story (Hardcover)
In recent times Google has become an all pervading phenomenon. As the modern net savvy generation comes to grip with Google beyond the Search Engine, this book traces the rise and occasional bumpy road to hacker fame for the Google founders and the company.

In a very easy to read fashion, David runs you through the basic idea of Google, the intent of the company and of course the leitmotiff of Do No Evil. However, all said and done the book is light on insights. There are really no inputs in the book on the Google Architecture, the process of Data Mining or even why indexing the world wide web is such a big task (although there are plenty of references to it). What it does bring out is the sheer focus of the Google team towards ensuring repetitive business through increasing the customer touch points. In a way this could be a good primer for aspiring businesses.

Don't read too much into it and if you have a long flight I would recommend that you get this instead of some fancy fiction.


Linux Cookbook
Linux Cookbook
by Carla Schroder
Edition: Paperback
Price: $34.27
72 used & new from $1.55

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nice book to have around, June 20, 2005
This review is from: Linux Cookbook (Paperback)
Let's face it O'Reilly books are generally of very good quality and personally I have rarely (if ever) been let down by the titles.

This book lives up to its reputation of being from the O'Reilly stable by providing focussed and well laid out recipes for Linux SysAdmins. Mind you, it does not address the productivity tools. There are far too many good books out there who do just the same and do it far more effectively. This book is for the user who has installed Linux (for the first time user, that is an experience by itself) and desires to use a lot of the underlying power to make life easy for him/her. Categorising the book as a HowTo would not do justice to the casual elegance of the writing style. This is definitely not a how to guide. Yet, it does show the user a number of tweaks and tricks that makes using a Linux system such a powerful experience. And each one of the recipes will ensure that administration of a Linux box is simple and trouble free.

The chapters are well laid out and well spaced. With the recipes and the scripts(...) that make it a very light read. From addressing the single user space and the related hassles to setting up shared printers, caching servers and time servers, the book manages to make it look very easy. A wonderful book to have. Especially for those days when you need a wee bit of help and things are just not happening.


Linux Desktop Hacks: Tips & Tools for Customizing and Optimizing your OS
Linux Desktop Hacks: Tips & Tools for Customizing and Optimizing your OS
by Nick Petreley
Edition: Paperback
Price: $24.95
62 used & new from $0.01

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A nice read and a must have, May 23, 2005
Linux Desktop Hacks carries forward the good work of the "Hacks" Series from O'Reilly. The Desktop is a niche area and a potential minefield with each end user having his/her own idea of what all can be done with the desktop.

The book manages to steer clear of becoming a simple reference guide for newbies, yet at the same time manages to cram a lot of power hacks that will appeal to the end users.

The book is well organised - taking the user through the booting process into tweaking the Desktop Environments. And as is the norm, the Hacks can stand alone by themselves or be interlinked. It is possible to link across the hacks.

By themselves, the hacks manage to answer some of the famous newbie questions on various User Group mailing lists - for example hack # 2 (killing and restoring the MBR). Chapters 9 & 10 dealing with Administration and Automation, Kernel contain hacks which power users will enjoy trying out.

On a personal note, some more detail about commercial distributions like Red Hat, Mandrake, Novell etc would have increased the appeal of this book to the desktop users of commercial desktop distributions. But this small glitch does in no way take the credit for the extreme level of detail and collation and compilation finesse shown by the authors. A nice read and a must have.


Memoirs of a Geisha Uk
Memoirs of a Geisha Uk
by Arthur Golden
Edition: Paperback
439 used & new from $0.01

4.0 out of 5 stars A fascintating read, November 13, 2004
This review is from: Memoirs of a Geisha Uk (Paperback)
My awareness of Japanese culture and more particularly the secretive lives of the Geishas is next to nil. Yet, this carefully crafted book manages to provide a well laid out plot of fictional ingenuity which is fascinating and enthralling.

Picked up the book after hearing a lot about it. And then could not put it down. From a very simple Chiyo to her evolution as one of 'them' is an engrossing read. More to notice is the choice of words and stylisation which brings out the colors of Japan in all vivid hues.

Great work.


In an Antique Land: History in the Guise of a Traveler's Tale
In an Antique Land: History in the Guise of a Traveler's Tale
by Ghosh Amitav
Edition: Paperback
Price: $11.52
189 used & new from $0.01

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fascinating read., October 21, 2004
Amitav Ghosh has for long being a favorite - for his simple and lucid style of writing as well as his wordplay when describing the swirling moods of a changing landscape. He is at his most competent In an Antique Land.

Read the book for the sheer joy of the language if not for the appealing nature of the story.


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