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Customer Reviews: 2
Top Reviewer Ranking: 4,172,736
Helpful Votes: 99




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Wii Tatsunoko vs. Capcom Arcade FightStick
Wii Tatsunoko vs. Capcom Arcade FightStick
Offered by Insane Web Deals...Simply the Best Deals on the Web!
Price: $109.98
8 used & new from $90.00

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Arcade Stick That Can Grow With You, March 19, 2011
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
Mad Catz has created a high-value gem in the Tatsunoko Vs Capcom Arcade Fightstick. The layout is arcade accurate, with quality components. The stick and buttons are essentially replicas of the Sanwa parts used in Japanese arcade cabinets. It's worth noting that Mad Catz improved the quality of these parts compared to their original PS3 and Xbox 360 FightSticks. I believe it, as the TvC FightStick feels really good, very much like a proper arcade stick. The joystick is biased towards fighting games, with a square gate to make finding diagonals easier. This design choice does mean that the joystick doesn't initially feel quite as responsive for classic shooters and platformers. I found I had to be more deliberate with my movements.

There are some thoughtful touches too, such as the movement of the + and - buttons to the top edge of the case so they aren't accidentally pressed in the heat of play. There's also a lock switch to disable the Home button. I also appreciate the switch that lets you toggle whether the stick functions as a D-pad, left analog, or right analog stick. Keeps in mind it's still a digital joystick, but it's a wonderful feature that broadens the FightStick's compatibility. It's especially handy to have analog stick emulation to navigate menus. Also, since the FightStick acts like a Classic Controller (it connects to the Remote), it's great for Virtual Console titles. Think of it as the ultimate NES Advantage. There's even a turbo function built in.

What I love most about this FightStick is how moddable it is, as I believe that's where the real value of this joystick lies. If you're comfortable with a screwdriver, you can purchase off-the-shelf, true arcade joysticks and buttons by Sanwa and Seimitsu, and they snap/screw right in. The wiring is even solderless. For a modest investment, you have a full-fledged arcade stick, that can personalized to your needs. In my case I popped in a Semitsu LS-56 joystick with bat style top. It's stiffer and engages its microswitches more quickly than a Sanwa (or stock Sanwa replica) joystick. I still find it great for fighting games, but now it's a great general use stick a variety of classic games.

I also highly recommend investing in a Mayflash Wii Classic Controller to PC USB Adapter. Combined with the TvC FightStick, you have an excellent arcade stick for Wii, PC, and PS3. At current prices, purchasing this stick seems like a no-brainer.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 9, 2011 9:18 PM PST


Koss KSC75 Portable Stereophone Headphones
Koss KSC75 Portable Stereophone Headphones
Price: $14.88
71 used & new from $11.80

89 of 95 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A no brainer for the price. Get them., June 15, 2005
Getting an iPod is what finally made me look into spending money on decent earphones. I first tried the Sony EX71 because friends said good things, and well, they were white. And they definitely sounded better than the stock Apple earbuds. More (but not necessarily better bass), better midrange, and the nice bonus of some sound insulation. I was satisfied.

As a consequence, I ended up doing more headphone listening at home too (apartment+subwoofer+late night=eviction), so I did some research looking for entry level performance headphones for home use. I ended up getting Alessandro Music Series One headphones (basically a Grado SR125 with mellower highs - also great headphones). The Alessandros were a revelation, as my first serious headphones. The Sony EX71 suddenly became a joke.

Well, after much research, one name kept coming up when it came to nice, cheap portable headphones: Koss. Many models were recommended: KSC35, KSC50, KSC75, PortaPro. I settled on the KSC75 as they're small clip-ons, and they were supposed to have a nice adjustable fit, in addition to fitting securely. I was skeptical though, as they were less than one third what I paid for my Sonys.

The KSC75 looks cheap. I wasn't impressed. But I have an open mind, so I gave them a listen. These suckers can rock! They deliver a really full sound, surprising for the size and price. They absolutely trounce the Apple earbuds and my old Sonys. And not by a narrow margin. The bass is impressive, and commendably tight. The midrange has real body to it. And the highs sound pleasing too. They also improve with a headphone amp, so they even have a little room to grow. I can't imagine anything under $50 sounding better. They don't really have any serious sonic faults in the $50 and under range. Considering the ludicrously low price Amazon is selling them for, nobody in their right mind should have any issue with the way the KSC75 performs. They are a noble backup to my Alessandros.

The KSC75 passed my running test. They fit well, they're easily adjusted, and they're secure. They're also quite comfortable. I also can hear enough around me that I'm aware of traffic.

Negatives: These headphones do not offer any isolation, so if you need that, consider Shure or Etymotic. If you're concerned about style, these also may not suit you. It's like you have little, silver UFOs clipped to your ears. Personally, I'm glad they're not available in "mug me white."


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