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Eppicotispai EP-89 Garganelli and Gnocchi Stripper with Paddle, Natural Beechwood, Brown
Eppicotispai EP-89 Garganelli and Gnocchi Stripper with Paddle, Natural Beechwood, Brown
Offered by BakeDeco
Price: $9.99
3 used & new from $9.02

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars SO much easier than using a fork!, July 31, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I've made lots of gnocchi, and I understand the importance of those sauce-holding ridges, but forming them with a fork has never quite worked for me. I've now made potato gnocchi, ricotta gnocchi, and cauliflower gnocchi with this board and they've all been brilliant.

I experimented with the garganelli roller, but the gnocchi dough was just wrong: I'll come back with a more standard pasta dough and update the review when I do.

(Cauliflower gnocchi? Easy! Just grab a copy of Pasta by Hand by Jenn Louis. It doesn't actually have a recipe for cauliflower gnocchi, but by the time you've finished it you'll know exactly what to do. Serve with brown butter and a sprinkle of parmesan for a completely different take on cauliflower cheese.)


SAVEUR: The New Classics Cookbook: 1,000 Recipes + Expert Advice, Tips, and Tales
SAVEUR: The New Classics Cookbook: 1,000 Recipes + Expert Advice, Tips, and Tales
Price: $10.49

2.0 out of 5 stars DREADFUL formatting on Kindle version, July 31, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Saveur and Cooks Illustrated are the only cooking magazines worth looking at, but I'm about to find out if it's possible to swap a Kindle book for a print version. The Kindle version has just been thrown together with no thought at all. Recipes are needlessly split across multiple pages. Sometimes there will be the title and the first ingredient at the bottom of one page, and everything else on the next. Navigation is dreadful: when looking at a recipe, the only way to get navigation controls is to TURN OFF the Kindle and turn it on again, at which point navigation controls show up for exactly three seconds.

The formatting problems could be solved simply by changing the format. Instead of having fixed pages that scroll right and left, if the book scrolled vertically it would be easy to position the recipes for best view.


Mastering Pasta: The Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and Risotto
Mastering Pasta: The Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and Risotto
by David Joachim
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $15.70
67 used & new from $12.25

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Masterful Pasta, May 9, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
[QUESTION: The photographs show the author plating gorgeous spirals of long pasta using something that looks exactly like a tuning fork. Does anyone know what it's called? I tried searching for "pasta fork" but that (of course) just gets me an endless procession of enormous, mutated spoons. I've been searching for months, and am about to give up and buy an actual tuning fork.]

I've made pasta for 20+ years, and this book raises my game entirely. The subtitle is: "The Art and Practice of Hand-Made Pasta, Gnocchi, and Risotto", and it means every word. You think risotto begins and ends with frantically stirring Arborio rice? So did I. Have you mastered potato, ricotta, and semolina gnocchi, and thought that was it? Here you also find chestnut, squash, bacalla(!), Swiss chard, AND cabbage gnocchi. The first one I made was cauliflower gnocchi, which isn't in the book, but the technique certainly is, and all it needed was some brown butter and a sprinkle of parmesan for an entirely different, elegant take on cauliflower cheese.

But it also runs the table on pasta, throwing in delightful ideas like Siamese-twin ravioli, with one half filled with (say) ricotta and the other with ragu. The book is so filled with inspiration that I get frothy just reading it. I bought the book for the techniques, not the recipes, but the recipes are brilliantly inventive. Marc Vetri makes an excellent case for milling your own flour, and I can confirm that the flavour is amazing, but the pasta itself was a mess, so there's obviously a brand-new learning curve to master in there.

If this book interests you, the recently-released Pasta by Hand is certainly also worth a look.


The Battle of Hood and Bismarck
The Battle of Hood and Bismarck
DVD
Price: $12.99

4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Overly-dramatic nonsense, May 7, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
An uncle of mine served on the Hood, so I know quite a bit about it. To portray it as equal to the Bismark is preposterous. It was designed during WWI and wasn't even a battleship, just a heavy cruiser with late-added armour that made it dangerously low in the water.

The portentous, "Survivor"-like commentary caused me to bail after a few minutes. There are MUCH better naval documentaries out there. Even Herman Wouk's novel "War and Remembrance" is more factual than this.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 8, 2015 7:24 AM PDT


Cathedral of the Wild: An African Journey Home
Cathedral of the Wild: An African Journey Home
by Boyd Varty
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $20.80
60 used & new from $2.25

4.0 out of 5 stars A slice of a different life, February 16, 2015
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Long before Nelson Mandela shows up, this book gets deeply absorbing. It's not particularly well-written, but that doesn't get in the way at all. What I liked most of all was the extended family's slow change from game hunters to committed conservationists. The internal life of the author - as he comes at life again and again, sometimes succeeding, sometimes being bitten by an alligator - is really well explored.


No Title Available

4.0 out of 5 stars Superceded by a new model, January 9, 2015
This is an excellent home-quality circulator, but Anova just released the Precision Cooker, which is a much-improved model with brilliant added features, like the ability to program and monitor it from your cellphone. It's priced slightly less, too.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 14, 2015 5:25 PM PST


New Star Foodservice 59076 Heavy Duty Cleaver with Wooden Handle and 8-Inch by 3.5-Inch Blade
New Star Foodservice 59076 Heavy Duty Cleaver with Wooden Handle and 8-Inch by 3.5-Inch Blade
Price: $9.95
3 used & new from $9.95

4.0 out of 5 stars Surprising quality for the price, December 18, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
The last cleaver I bought at this price point quickly got gouged and nicked into uselessness. Two weeks into dismembering poultry with this thing, it looks like new.

I wouldn't recommend using it on anything heavier - for that you need a real butcher's cleaver - but it works well and is fairly comfortable. The knife is full-tang and the wooden handle is properly riveted, but the wood could be smoother, which prompted me to sand it down to how I like it and now its very comfortable. Treat it as a proper knife, keep it out of the dishwasher, and it'll last for years.


Bar Tartine: Techniques & Recipes
Bar Tartine: Techniques & Recipes
by Cortney Burns
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $22.00
78 used & new from $17.35

62 of 64 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inspiring, Uncompromising Cookbook, December 4, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
The philosophy behind this book is immediately apparent: the first 150 pages contain recipes for ingredients, not dishes. But what ingredients! Goat cheese, pork fat chile oil, rice vinegar, Brussels kraut, fig leaf syrup, mushroom broth, karasumi/bottarga(!) An entire other category is powders - onion, garlic, yoghurt, rice koji, kale, parsnip, sauerkraut - that are bright and fresh and perfect for inventive sous vide recipes. One warning though: the recipe for black garlic (put garlic heads in a slow cooker set on Warm, for two weeks) mentions the intense smell: I confirm that it can go through walls.

But back to that mushroom broth: it is ordinarily made with water and a few mushrooms, and is invariably insipid; this recipe cooks LOTS of fresh mushrooms at low temperature for hours then extracts all the liquid from them, is all. The recipe made so much sense that it was the first thing I made. It's easily the best mushroom broth in the world, but these guys also include a recipe to further reduce it to an emulsion, good grief.

The recipes for dishes, when they finally start, are very inventive and just as uncompromising. Cabbage rolls with fish cake starts with the recipe for making fish cake. The result is probably not that different from wrapping store-bought fish cake with cabbage (a pairing made in Heaven), but hey: now I can invent new fish cakes laced with (say) white anchovies, katsuobushi, or even that bottarga. Slow-roasted carrots with burnt bread and almond milk sounds bizarre, but after reading the recipe it sounds compelling.

Only after the first read-thru did I realize that - never mind the heavy use of Asian ingredients - the heart of this cookbook beats in Hungary. It uses no exotic, overpriced ingredients, and the recipes, while long and complicated, are not in themselves difficult. This is SLOW food, in the best sense of the word: some of the recipes would take months to make if you had to start from scratch. Right now is prime Brussels sprout season, so grab the book now, get the Brussels kraut started, and by next summer you'll be ready to cook with it. The authors spent years learning and developing their techniques, and are graciously sharing them with us here.


Black & Decker TO3210SSD Countertop Convection Toaster Oven, Silver
Black & Decker TO3210SSD Countertop Convection Toaster Oven, Silver
Price: $59.99
12 used & new from $47.99

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Works fine for a basic model (if you don't mind loud ticking, that is), October 31, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
This oven is getting a great workout right now because it is our entire kitchen right now (it'll be another couple weeks before we've built the new one). Toasting bread takes some time in toaster ovens, and the bread tends to dry out, but this one makes wonderful toasted cheese (melted 'n browned cheddar over toast). I've even turned it into a double oven: bake chicken pot pies, then put them on top of the oven with a dishcloth over them to keep them warm while baking puff pastry tops for them. It also does a good job of cooking frozen French fries.

But the toast and oven timers are LOUD CLOCKWORK, which besides being primitive is annoying, and also requires you to select the toast colour every time you toast. And the interface? Who on Earth thought up toaster oven controls? Three dials, all three of which have to be in a specific position before it'll make toast.

But unless you're going to splash for the wonderful (and expensive) Breville, this will work as well as any under-$100 toaster oven out there.


Stop Drifting, Start Rowing: One Woman's Search for Happiness and Meaning Alone on the Pacific
Stop Drifting, Start Rowing: One Woman's Search for Happiness and Meaning Alone on the Pacific
by Roz Savage
Edition: Paperback
Price: $12.98
46 used & new from $1.23

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Very odd woman on a very odd pursuit, October 13, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I can completely understand the deep, primal appeal of a long, singlehanded sailing voyage. Bernard Moitessier's The Long Way is a beautiful rapture of the deep. He was winning the first round-the-world-nonstop sailing race, but instead of heading north to claim his prize, he sailed around again, all the way to Tahiti, without ever stopping.

This is something else. This is rowing across an ocean to prove that you can row across an ocean. Now that it's been done, someone will no doubt row frontwards across an ocean, and then someone will do it in a birchbark canoe, and then with no paddle, and so on. All of those ways are very short on pleasure.

So you are guaranteed to meet a very odd person in here. She's a global warming and ocean-ecological-disaster nut much like myself, but she is also a strangely uninformed one: when she meets a sunfish doing what sunfish do (lie on their sides and flap their flippers in the air, literally sunbathing), she assumes it's some horrible pollution-mutant.

But hey: she dumped her bog-standard life-with-hubby-n-kids to go find her adventure, and obviously loves doing what she does, and there is genuine adventure in here. I enjoyed the book.


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